Books > Old Books > A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914)


Page 25

PART I - THE PRESENT
CHAPTER IV - MY WOOD

to do something to it. Yet he isn't sure what. A restlessness comes over him, a vague sense that he has a personality to express -the same sense which, without any vagueness, leads the artist to an act of creation. Sometimes I think I will cut down such trees as remain in the wood, at other times I want to fill up the gaps between them with new trees. Both impulses are pretentious and empty. They are not honest movements towards money-making or beauty. They spring from a foolish desire to express myself and from an inability to enjoy what I have got. Creation, property, enjoyment form a sinister trinity in the human mind. Creation and enjoyment are both very very good, yet they are often unattainable without a material basis, and at such moments property pushes itself in as a substitute, saying, ' Accept me instead-I'm good enough for all three.' It is not enough. It is, as Shakespeare said of lust, ' The expense of spirit in a waste of shame ' : it is' Before, a joy proposed ; behind, a dream.' Yet we don't know how to shun it. It is forced on us by our economic system as the alternative to starvation. It is also forced on us by an internal defect in the soul, by the feeling that in property may lie the germs of self-development and of exquisite or heroic deeds. Our life on earth is, and ought to be, material and carnal. But we have not yet learned to manage our materialism and carnality properly ; they are still entangled with the desire for ownership, where (in the words of Dante) ` Possession is one with loss.'
And this brings us to our fourth and final point : the blackberries.
Blackberries are not plentiful in this meagre grove, but they are easily seen from the public footpath which traverses it, and all too easily gathered. Foxgloves, too-people will pull up the foxgloves, and ladies of an educational tendency even grub for toadstools to show them on the Monday in class. Other ladies, less educated, roll down the bracken in the arms of their gentlemen friends. There is paper, there are tins. Pray, does my wood belong to me or doesn't it ? And, if it does, should I not own it best by allowing no one else to walk there ? There is a wood near Lyme Regis, also cursed by a public footpath, where the owner has not hesitated on this point. He has built-high stone walls each side of the path, and has spanned it by bridges, so that the

Page 26

PART I - THE PRESENT
CHAPTER IV - MY WOOD

public circulate like termites while he gorges on the blackberries unseen. He really does own his wood, this able chap. Dives in Hell did pretty well, but the gulf dividing him from Lazarus could be traversed by vision, and nothing traverses it here. And perhaps I shall come to this in time. I shall wall in and fence out until I really taste the sweets of property. Enormously stout, endlessly avaricious, pseudo-creative, intensely selfish, I shall weave upon my forehead the quadruple crown of possession until those nasty Bolshies come and take it off again and thrust me aside into the outer darkness.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE to do something to it. Yet he isn't sure what. A restlessness comes over him, a vague sense that he has a personality to express -the same sense which, without any vagueness, leads what is artist to an act of creation. Sometimes I think I will cut down such trees as remain in what is wood, at other times I want to fill up what is gaps between them with new trees. Both impulses are pretentious and empty. They are not honest movements towards money-making or beauty. They spring from a foolish desire to express myself and from an inability to enjoy what I have got. Creation, property, enjoyment form a sinister trinity in what is human mind. Creation and enjoyment are both very very good, yet they are often unattainable without a material basis, and at such moments property pushes itself in as a substitute, saying, ' Accept me instead-I'm good enough for all three.' It is not enough. It is, as Shakespeare s where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 25 where is strong PART I - what is PRESENT CHAPTER IV - MY WOOD where is p align="justify" to do something to it. Yet he isn't sure what. A restlessness comes over him, a vague sense that he has a personality to express -the same sense which, without any vagueness, leads what is artist to an act of creation. Sometimes I think I will cut down such trees as remain in what is wood, at other times I want to fill up what is gaps between them with new trees. Both impulses are pretentious and empty. They are not honest movements towards money-making or beauty. They spring from a foolish desire to express myself and from an inability to enjoy what I have got. Creation, property, enjoyment form a sinister trinity in what is human mind. Creation and enjoyment are both very very good, yet they are often unattainable without a material basis, and at such moments property pushes itself in as a substitute, saying, ' Accept me instead-I'm good enough for all three.' It is not enough. It is, as Shakespeare said of lust, ' what is expense of spirit in a waste of shame ' : it is' Before, a joy proposed ; behind, a dream.' Yet we don't know how to shun it. It is forced on us by our economic system as what is alternative to starvation. It is also forced on us by an internal defect in what is soul, by what is feeling that in property may lie what is germs of self-development and of exquisite or heroic deeds. Our life on earth is, and ought to be, material and carnal. But we have not yet learned to manage our materialism and carnality properly ; they are still entangled with what is desire for ownership, where (in what is words of Dante) ` Possession is one with loss.' And this brings us to our fourth and final point : what is blackberries. Blackberries are not plentiful in this meagre grove, but they are easily seen from what is public footpath which traverses it, and all too easily gathered. Foxgloves, too-people will pull up what is foxgloves, and ladies of an educational tendency even grub for toadstools to show them on what is Monday in class. Other ladies, less educated, roll down what is bracken in what is arms of their gentlemen friends. There is paper, there are tins. Pray, does my wood belong to me or doesn't it ? And, if it does, should I not own it best by allowing no one else to walk there ? There is a wood near Lyme Regis, also cursed by a public footpath, where what is owner has not hesitated on this point. He has built-high stone walls each side of what is path, and has spanned it by bridges, so that what is where is p align="left" Page 26 where is strong PART I - what is PRESENT CHAPTER IV - MY WOOD where is p align="justify" public circulate like termites while he gorges on what is blackberries unseen. He really does own his wood, this able chap. Dives in fun did pretty well, but what is gulf dividing him from Lazarus could be traversed by vision, and nothing traverses it here. And perhaps I shall come to this in time. I shall wall in and fence out until I really taste what is sweets of property. Enormously stout, endlessly avaricious, pseudo-creative, intensely selfish, I shall weave upon my forehead what is quadruple crown of possession until those nasty Bolshies come and take it off again and thrust me aside into what is outer darkness. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , iii , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 021 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 310 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 317 , 318 , 319 , 320 , 321 , 322 , 323 , 324 , 325 , 326 , 327 , 328 , 329 , 330