Books > Old Books > A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914)


Page 19

PART I - THE PRESENT
CHAPTER II - MRS. GRUNDY AT THE PARKERS'

` Nosey, do explain what has happened,' his wife said.
` Nothing has happened. It is only an idea.'
` Ideas have never troubled me, especially from abroad,' said Mrs. Grundy.
` You are fortunate. I own myself worried by this one. The idea is that we, who have helped others, ought now to be helped, and it is proposed to help us by pulling us to pieces.' He shuddered. ` To you that means little. But I have always had doubts of my own solidity. How can I bring it home to you ? They desire to examine your intimate fabric, Mrs. Grundy : they suspect it of being diseased. My wife's and my own they assert to be even fouler than yours. They believe that we all three try to improve people because we envy their happiness and had bad luck ourselves when we were young. What so alarms me is that there is no bitterness in the new attack. We are actually objects of pity.'
` And, pray, is that all ? ' said Mrs. Grundy, with her dry little laugh. ` You may have given Edith a headache over this, but you have no such effect on me. I am quite accustomed to pity. I got a lot as a girl. It is merely a term of abuse, and I shall castigate it in due season. Good-bye, my dear sir, and take an old woman's advice : keep away from foreign newspapers in the future.' And, gathering up her skirts, she left their house-perhaps for her doom.
` Poor thing, she doesn't know the danger,' said Mrs. Parker, looking after their friend anxiously, and observing how she first scowled at Doris and then lectured some navvies for using a word which had been devitalized twenty years previously by Mr. Bernard Shaw. ' She is brave because she is out of date. But we-oh Nosey, Nosey ! Fancy, if it gets known that interference is a disease which ought to be interfered with. Men and women will live as they like, they will be natural and decent about one another, and we shall boss and nag at them no more.'
` Too true, too true,' said her husband, ` and yet I see a ray of hope. Our enemies cannot interfere with us unless they organize. As individuals they are helpless. They will have to form Freedom Leagues, or Anti-Fuss Societies or sign Beach Pyjama Covenants, and they cannot do so without constituting

Page 20

PART I - THE PRESENT
CHAPTER II - MRS. GRUNDY AT THE PARKERS'

themselves into committees. And as soon as they meet on committees . . . yes, I think we shall survive after all.'
Will they survive? Only Doris, who is the future, can tell.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE ` Nosey, do explain what has happened,' his wife said. ` Nothing has happened. It is only an idea.' ` Ideas have never troubled me, especially from abroad,' said Mrs. Grundy. ` You are fortunate. I own myself worried by this one. what is idea is that we, who have helped others, ought now to be helped, and it is proposed to help us by pulling us to pieces.' He shuddered. ` To you that means little. But I have always had doubts of my own solidity. How can I bring it home to you ? They desire to examine your intimate fabric, Mrs. Grundy : they suspect it of being diseased. My wife's and my own they assert to be even fouler than yours. They believe that we all three try to improve people because we envy their happiness and had bad luck ourselves when we were young. What so alarms me is that there is no bitterness in what is new attack. We are actually objects of pity.' ` And, pray, is that all ? ' s where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 19 where is strong PART I - what is PRESENT CHAPTER II - MRS. GRUNDY AT what is PARKERS' where is p align="justify" ` Nosey, do explain what has happened,' his wife said. ` Nothing has happened. It is only an idea.' ` Ideas have never troubled me, especially from abroad,' said Mrs. Grundy. ` You are fortunate. I own myself worried by this one. what is idea is that we, who have helped others, ought now to be helped, and it is proposed to help us by pulling us to pieces.' He shuddered. ` To you that means little. But I have always had doubts of my own solidity. How can I bring it home to you ? They desire to examine your intimate fabric, Mrs. Grundy : they suspect it of being diseased. My wife's and my own they assert to be even fouler than yours. They believe that we all three try to improve people because we envy their happiness and had bad luck ourselves when we were young. What so alarms me is that there is no bitterness in what is new attack. We are actually objects of pity.' ` And, pray, is that all ? ' said Mrs. Grundy, with her dry little laugh. ` You may have given Edith a headache over this, but you have no such effect on me. I am quite accustomed to pity. I got a lot as a girl. It is merely a term of abuse, and I shall castigate it in due season. Good-bye, my dear sir, and take an old woman's advice : keep away from foreign newspapers in what is future.' And, gathering up her skirts, she left their house-perhaps for her doom. ` Poor thing, she doesn't know what is danger,' said Mrs. Parker, looking after their friend anxiously, and observing how she first scowled at Doris and then lectured some navvies for using a word which had been devitalized twenty years previously by Mr. Bernard Shaw. ' She is brave because she is out of date. But we-oh Nosey, Nosey ! Fancy, if it gets known that interference is a disease which ought to be interfered with. Men and women will live as they like, they will be natural and decent about one another, and we shall boss and nag at them no more.' ` Too true, too true,' said her husband, ` and yet I see a ray of hope. Our enemies cannot interfere with us unless they organize. As individuals they are helpless. They will have to form Freedom Leagues, or Anti-Fuss Societies or sign Beach Pyjama Covenants, and they cannot do so without constituting where is p align="left" Page 20 where is strong PART I - what is PRESENT CHAPTER II - MRS. GRUNDY AT what is PARKERS' where is p align="justify" themselves into committees. And as soon as they meet on committees . . . yes, I think we shall survive after all.' Will they survive? Only Doris, who is what is future, can tell. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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