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Page 16

PART I - THE PRESENT
CHAPTER II - MRS. GRUNDY AT THE PARKERS'

Think of our triumph the other month-that man who was arrested for bathing at Worthing.'
` Ah, don't talk to me about bathing. I often wish there was no such place in these islands as the sea-shore.'
` That is shallow of you. If there was no sea-shore, how could we catch people on it ? Besides, I approve of bathing, provided it is so regulated that no one can enjoy it. We are working towards that. You were a great pioneer, but you made the mistake of trying to suppress people's pleasure. I try to spoil their pleasure. It's much more effective. I don't say, " You shan't bathe." I say, " You shall bathe in an atmosphere of self-consciousness and fear," and I think I am succeeding. I certainly have at Worthing.'
` I expect I read about Worthing, but where everything is so shameless one gets bewildered.'
'Why, the case of the visitor who bathed, properly clad, and then returned to his bathing machine to dry. Thinking no one could see him, since the machine faced the ocean, he left its door open. He had reckoned without my foresight. I had arranged that a policewoman should be swimming out at sea. As soon as she observed him, she signalled to a policeman on shore, who went to the machine and arrested him. Now, Amelia, would you have ever thought of that ?'
` I certainly shouldn't have. I don't like the idea of women policemen at all. A woman's proper place is in her home.'
` But surely there can't be too many women anywhere.'
` I don't know. Anyhow, I am glad the visitor was arrested. It will stop him and others going to English seaside resorts, which is a step in the right direction, and I hope the magistrate convicted.'
` Oh, yes. Magistrates nearly always convict. They are afraid of being thought to condone immorality. As my husband points out, that is one of our strong cards. In his private capacity the magistrate was probably not shocked. The average man simply doesn't mind, you see. He doesn't mind about bathing costumes or their absence, or bad language, or inderent literature, or even about sex.' At this point she rang the bell. ` Doris, bring the smelling salts,' she said, for Mrs. Grundy had fainted. When consciousness had been restored, she continued :

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Think of our triumph what is other month-that man who was arrested for bathing at Worthing.' ` Ah, don't talk to me about bathing. I often wish there was no such place in these islands as what is sea-shore.' ` That is shallow of you. If there was no sea-shore, how could we catch people on it ? Besides, I approve of bathing, provided it is so regulated that no one can enjoy it. We are working towards that. You were a great pioneer, but you made what is mistake of trying to suppress people's pleasure. I try to spoil their pleasure. It's much more effective. I don't say, " You shan't bathe." I say, " You shall bathe in an atmosphere of self-consciousness and fear," and I think I am succeeding. I certainly have at Worthing.' ` I expect I read about Worthing, but where everything is so shameless one gets bewildered.' 'Why, what is case of what is what is or who bathed, properly clad, and then re where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 16 where is strong PART I - what is PRESENT CHAPTER II - MRS. GRUNDY AT what is PARKERS' where is p align="justify" Think of our triumph what is other month-that man who was arrested for bathing at Worthing.' ` Ah, don't talk to me about bathing. I often wish there was no such place in these islands as what is sea-shore.' ` That is shallow of you. If there was no sea-shore, how could we catch people on it ? Besides, I approve of bathing, provided it is so regulated that no one can enjoy it. We are working towards that. You were a great pioneer, but you made what is mistake of trying to suppress people's pleasure. I try to spoil their pleasure. It's much more effective. I don't say, " You shan't bathe." I say, " You shall bathe in an atmosphere of self-consciousness and fear," and I think I am succeeding. I certainly have at Worthing.' ` I expect I read about Worthing, but where everything is so shameless one gets bewildered.' 'Why, what is case of what is what is or who bathed, properly clad, and then returned to his bathing machine to dry. Thinking no one could see him, since what is machine faced what is ocean, he left its door open. He had reckoned without my foresight. I had arranged that a policewoman should be swimming out at sea. As soon as she observed him, she signalled to a policeman on shore, who went to what is machine and arrested him. Now, Amelia, would you have ever thought of that ?' ` I certainly shouldn't have. I don't like what is idea of women policemen at all. A woman's proper place is in her home.' ` But surely there can't be too many women anywhere.' ` I don't know. Anyhow, I am glad what is what is or was arrested. It will stop him and others going to English seaside resorts, which is a step in what is right direction, and I hope what is magistrate convicted.' ` Oh, yes. Magistrates nearly always convict. They are afraid of being thought to condone immorality. As my husband points out, that is one of our strong cards. In his private capacity what is magistrate was probably not shocked. what is average man simply doesn't mind, you see. He doesn't mind about bathing costumes or their absence, or bad language, or inderent literature, or even about sports .' At this point she rang what is bell. ` Doris, bring what is smelling salts,' she said, for Mrs. Grundy had fainted. When consciousness had been restored, she continued : where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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