Books > Old Books > A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914)


Page 13

PART I - THE PRESENT
CHAPTER I - NOTES ON THE ENGLISH CHARACTER

prevents his rising to certain heights, also prevents him from sinking to these depths. Because he doesn't produce mystics he doesn't produce villains either ; he gives the world no prophets, but no anarchists, no fanatics-religious or political.
Of course there are cruel and treacherous people in England -one has only to look at the police courts-and examples of public infamy can be found, such as the Arpritsar massacre. But one does not look at the police courts or the military mind to find the soul of any nation ; and the more English people one meets the more convinced one becomes that the charges as a whole are untrue. Yet foreign critics often make them. Why ? Partly because they fix their eyes on the criminal classes, partly because they are annoyed with certain genuine defects in the English character, and in their irritation throw in cruelty in order to make the problem simpler. Moral indignation is always agreeable, but nearly always misplaced. It is indulged in both by the English and by the critics of the English. They all find it great fun. The drawback is that while they are amusing themselves the world becomes neither wiser nor better.
The main point of these notes is that the English character is incomplete. No national character is complete. We have to look for some qualities in one part of the world and others in another. But the English character is incomplete in a way that is particularly annoying to the foreign observer. It has a bad surface-self-complacent, unsympathetic, and reserved. There is plenty of emotion further down, but it never gets used. There is plenty of brain power, but it is more often used to confirm prejudices than to dispel them. With such an equipment the Englishman cannot be popular. Only I would repeat : there is little vice in him and no real coldness. It is the machinery that is wrong.
I hope and believe myself that in the next twenty years we shall see a great change, and that the national character will alter into something that is less unique but more lovable. The supremacy of the middle classes is probably ending. What new element the working classes will introduce one cannot say, but at all events they will not have been educated at public schools. And whether these notes praise or blame the English character-that is only incidental. They are the notes of a student who is trying to get

Page 14

PART I - THE PRESENT
CHAPTER I - NOTES ON THE ENGLISH CHARACTER

at the truth and would value the assistance of others. I believe myself that the truth is great and that it shall prevail. I have no faith in official caution and reticence. The cats are all out of their bags, and diplomacy cannot recall them. The nations must understand one another, and quickly ; and without the interposition of their governments, for the shrinkage of the globe is throwing them into one another's arms. To that understanding these notes are a feeble contribution-notes on the English character as it has struck a novelist.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE prevents his rising to certain heights, also prevents him from sinking to these depths. Because he doesn't produce mystics he doesn't produce villains either ; he gives what is world no prophets, but no anarchists, no fanatics-religious or political. Of course there are cruel and treacherous people in England -one has only to look at what is police courts-and examples of public infamy can be found, such as what is Arpritsar massacre. But one does not look at what is police courts or what is military mind to find what is soul of any nation ; and what is more English people one meets what is more convinced one becomes that what is charges as a whole are untrue. Yet foreign critics often make them. Why ? Partly because they fix their eyes on what is criminal classes, partly because they are annoyed with certain genuine defects in what is English character, and in their irritation throw in cruelty in order to make what is problem simpler. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 13 where is strong PART I - what is PRESENT CHAPTER I - NOTES ON what is ENGLISH CHARACTER where is p align="justify" prevents his rising to certain heights, also prevents him from sinking to these depths. Because he doesn't produce mystics he doesn't produce villains either ; he gives what is world no prophets, but no anarchists, no fanatics-religious or political. Of course there are cruel and treacherous people in England -one has only to look at what is police courts-and examples of public infamy can be found, such as what is Arpritsar massacre. But one does not look at what is police courts or what is military mind to find what is soul of any nation ; and what is more English people one meets what is more convinced one becomes that what is charges as a whole are untrue. Yet foreign critics often make them. Why ? Partly because they fix their eyes on what is criminal classes, partly because they are annoyed with certain genuine defects in what is English character, and in their irritation throw in cruelty in order to make what is problem simpler. Moral indignation is always agreeable, but nearly always misplaced. It is indulged in both by what is English and by what is critics of the English. They all find it great fun. what is drawback is that while they are amusing themselves what is world becomes neither wiser nor better. what is main point of these notes is that what is English character is incomplete. No national character is complete. We have to look for some qualities in one part of what is world and others in another. But what is English character is incomplete in a way that is particularly annoying to what is foreign observer. It has a bad surface-self-complacent, unsympathetic, and reserved. There is plenty of emotion further down, but it never gets used. There is plenty of brain power, but it is more often used to confirm prejudices than to dispel them. With such an equipment what is Englishman cannot be popular. Only I would repeat : there is little vice in him and no real coldness. It is what is machinery that is wrong. I hope and believe myself that in what is next twenty years we shall see a great change, and that what is national character will alter into something that is less unique but more lovable. what is supremacy of what is middle classes is probably ending. What new element the working classes will introduce one cannot say, but at all events they will not have been educated at public schools. And whether these notes praise or blame what is English character-that is only incidental. They are what is notes of a student who is trying to get where is p align="left" Page 14 where is strong PART I - what is PRESENT CHAPTER I - NOTES ON what is ENGLISH CHARACTER where is p align="justify" at what is truth and would value what is assistance of others. I believe myself that what is truth is great and that it shall prevail. I have no faith in official caution and reticence. The cats are all out of their bags, and diplomacy cannot recall them. what is nations must understand one another, and quickly ; and without what is interposition of their governments, for what is shrinkage of the globe is throwing them into one another's arms. To that understanding these notes are a feeble contribution-notes on what is English character as it has struck a novelist. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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