Books > Old Books > A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914)


Page 12

PART I - THE PRESENT
CHAPTER I - NOTES ON THE ENGLISH CHARACTER

of fish. And in the end nothing is done, nothing ; the four impecunious ladies are not even helped in the moving of their furniture.
Well, are the john Dashwoods hypocrites ? It depends upon our definition of hypocrisy. The young man could not see his evil impulses as they gathered force and gained on him. And even his wife, though a worse character, is also self-deceived. She reflects that old Mr. Dashwood may have been out of his mind at his death. She thinks of her own little boy-and surely a mother ought to think of her own child. She has muddled herself so completely that in one sentence she can refuse the ladies the income that would enable them to keep a carriage and in the next can say that they will not be keeping a carriage and so will have no expenses. No doubt men and women in other lands can muddle themselves, too, yet the state of mind of Mr. and Mrs. John Dashwood seems to me typical of England. They are slow-they take time even to do wrong ; whereas people in other lands do wrong quickly.
There are national faults as there are national diseases, and perhaps one can draw a parallel between them. It has always impressed me that the national diseases of England should be cancer and. consumption-slow, insidious, pretending to be something else ; while the diseases proper to the South should be cholera and plague, which strike at -a man when he is perfectly well and may leave him a corpse by evening. Mr, and Mrs. John Dashwood are moral consumptives. They collapse gradually without realizing what the disease is. There is nothing dramatic or violent about their sin. You cannot call them villains.
Here is the place to glance at some of the other charges that have been brought against the English as a nation. They have, for instance, been accused of treachery, cruelty, and fanaticism. In these charges I have never been able to see the least point, because treachery and cruelty are conscious sins. The man knows he is doing wrong, and does it deliberately, like Tartuffe or Iago. He betrays his friend because he wishes to. He tortures his prisoners because he enjoys seeing the blood flow. He worships the Devil because he prefers evil to good. From villainies such as these the average Englishman is free. His character, which

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE of fish. And in what is end nothing is done, nothing ; what is four impecunious ladies are not even helped in what is moving of their furniture. Well, are what is john Dashwoods hypocrites ? It depends upon our definition of hypocrisy. what is young man could not see his evil impulses as they gathered force and gained on him. And even his wife, though a worse character, is also self-deceived. She reflects that old Mr. Dashwood may have been out of his mind at his what time is it . She thinks of her own little boy-and surely a mother ought to think of her own child. She has muddled herself so completely that in one sentence she can refuse what is ladies what is income that would enable them to keep a carriage and in what is next can say that they will not be keeping a carriage and so will have no expenses. No doubt men and women in other lands can muddle themselves, too, yet what is state of mind of Mr. and Mrs. John Dashwood seems to where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 12 where is strong PART I - what is PRESENT CHAPTER I - NOTES ON what is ENGLISH CHARACTER where is p align="justify" of fish. And in what is end nothing is done, nothing ; what is four impecunious ladies are not even helped in what is moving of their furniture. Well, are what is john Dashwoods hypocrites ? It depends upon our definition of hypocrisy. what is young man could not see his evil impulses as they gathered force and gained on him. And even his wife, though a worse character, is also self-deceived. She reflects that old Mr. Dashwood may have been out of his mind at his what time is it . She thinks of her own little boy-and surely a mother ought to think of her own child. She has muddled herself so completely that in one sentence she can refuse what is ladies what is income that would enable them to keep a carriage and in what is next can say that they will not be keeping a carriage and so will have no expenses. No doubt men and women in other lands can muddle themselves, too, yet what is state of mind of Mr. and Mrs. John Dashwood seems to me typical of England. They are slow-they take time even to do wrong ; whereas people in other lands do wrong quickly. There are national faults as there are national diseases, and perhaps one can draw a parallel between them. It has always impressed me that what is national diseases of England should be cancer and. consumption-slow, insidious, pretending to be something else ; while what is diseases proper to what is South should be cholera and plague, which strike at -a man when he is perfectly well and may leave him a corpse by evening. Mr, and Mrs. John Dashwood are moral consumptives. They collapse gradually without realizing what what is disease is. There is nothing dramatic or bad about their sin. You cannot call them villains. Here is what is place to glance at some of what is other charges that have been brought against what is English as a nation. They have, for instance, been accused of treachery, cruelty, and fanaticism. In these charges I have never been able to see what is least point, because treachery and cruelty are conscious sins. what is man knows he is doing wrong, and does it deliberately, like Tartuffe or Iago. He betrays his friend because he wishes to. He tortures his prisoners because he enjoys seeing what is blood flow. He worships what is fun because he prefers evil to good. From villainies such as these what is average Englishman is free. His character, which where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , iii , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 021 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 310 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 317 , 318 , 319 , 320 , 321 , 322 , 323 , 324 , 325 , 326 , 327 , 328 , 329 , 330