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Page 11

PART I - THE PRESENT
CHAPTER I - NOTES ON THE ENGLISH CHARACTER

the island of hypocrites, the people who have built up an Empire with a Bible in one hand, a pistol in the other, and financial concessions in both pockets. Is the charge true ? I think it is ; but while making it we must be quite clear as to what we mean by hypocrisy. Do we mean conscious deceit ? Well, the English are comparatively guiltless of this ; they have little of the Renaissance villain about them. Do we mean unconscious deceit ? Muddleheadedness ? Of this I believe them to be guilty. When an Englishman has been led into a course of wrong action, he has nearly always begun by muddling himself. A public-school education does not make for mental clearness, and he possesses to a very high degree the power of confusing his own mind. We have seen this tendency at work in the domain of theology ; how does it work in the domain of conduct ?
Jane Austen may seem an odd authority to cite, but Jane Austen has, within her limits, a marvellous insight into the English mind. Her range is limited, her characters never attempt any of the more scarlet sins. But she has a merciless eye for questions of conduct, and the classical example of two English people muddling themselves before they embark upon a wrong course of action is to be found in the opening chapters of Sense and Sensibility. Old Mr. Dashwood has just died. He has been twice married. By his first marriage he has a son, John ; by his second marriage three daughters. The son is well off ; the young ladies and their mother-for Mr. Dashwood's second wife survives him-are badly off. He has called his son to his death-bed and has solemnly adjured him to provide for the second family. Much moved, the young man promises, and mentally decides to give each of his sisters a thousand pounds ; and then the comedy begins. For he announces his generous intention to his wife, and Mrs. John Dashwood by no means approves of depriving their own little boy of so large a sum. The thousand pounds are accordingly reduced to five hundred. But even this seems rather much. Might not an annuity to the stepmother be less of a wrench ? Yes-but though less of a wrench it might be more of a drain, for ' she is very stout and healthy, and scarcely forty.' An occasional present of fifty pounds will be better, ` and -will, I think, be amply discharging my promise to my father.' Or, better still, an occasional present

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE the island of hypocrites, what is people who have built up an Empire with a Bible in one hand, a pistol in what is other, and financial concessions in both pockets. Is what is charge true ? I think it is ; but while making it we must be quite clear as to what we mean by hypocrisy. Do we mean conscious deceit ? Well, what is English are comparatively guiltless of this ; they have little of what is Renaissance villain about them. Do we mean unconscious deceit ? Muddleheadedness ? Of this I believe them to be guilty. When an Englishman has been led into a course of wrong action, he has nearly always begun by muddling himself. A public-school education does not make for mental clearness, and he possesses to a very high degree what is power of confusing his own mind. We have seen this tendency at work in what is domain of theology ; how does it work in what is domain of conduct ? Jane Austen may seem an odd authority to cit where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 11 where is strong PART I - what is PRESENT CHAPTER I - NOTES ON what is ENGLISH CHARACTER where is p align="justify" the island of hypocrites, what is people who have built up an Empire with a Bible in one hand, a pistol in what is other, and financial concessions in both pockets. Is what is charge true ? I think it is ; but while making it we must be quite clear as to what we mean by hypocrisy. Do we mean conscious deceit ? Well, what is English are comparatively guiltless of this ; they have little of what is Renaissance villain about them. Do we mean unconscious deceit ? Muddleheadedness ? Of this I believe them to be guilty. When an Englishman has been led into a course of wrong action, he has nearly always begun by muddling himself. A public-school education does not make for mental clearness, and he possesses to a very high degree what is power of confusing his own mind. We have seen this tendency at work in what is domain of theology ; how does it work in what is domain of conduct ? Jane Austen may seem an odd authority to cite, but Jane Austen has, within her limits, a marvellous insight into what is English mind. Her range is limited, her characters never attempt any of what is more scarlet sins. But she has a merciless eye for questions of conduct, and what is classical example of two English people muddling themselves before they embark upon a wrong course of action is to be found in what is opening chapters of Sense and Sensibility. Old Mr. Dashwood has just died. He has been twice married. By his first marriage he has a son, John ; by his second marriage three daughters. The son is well off ; what is young ladies and their mother-for Mr. Dashwood's second wife survives him-are badly off. He has called his son to his what time is it -bed and has solemnly adjured him to provide for what is second family. Much moved, what is young man promises, and mentally decides to give each of his sisters a thousand pounds ; and then what is comedy begins. For he announces his generous intention to his wife, and Mrs. John Dashwood by no means approves of depriving their own little boy of so large a sum. what is thousand pounds are accordingly reduced to five hundred. But even this seems rather much. Might not an annuity to what is stepmother be less of a wrench ? Yes-but though less of a wrench it might be more of a drain, for ' she is very stout and healthy, and scarcely forty.' An occasional present of fifty pounds will be better, ` and -will, I think, be amply discharging my promise to my father.' Or, better still, an occasional present where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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