Books > Old Books > A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914)


Page 7

PART I - THE PRESENT
CHAPTER I - NOTES ON THE ENGLISH CHARACTER

coach, containing some Englishmen and some Frenchmen, was driving over the Alps. The horses ran away, and as they were dashing across a bridge the coach caught on the stonework, tottered, and nearly fell into the ravine below. The Frenchmen were frantic with terror : they screamed and gesticulated and flung themselves about, as Frenchmen would. The Englishmen sat quite calm. An hour later the coach drew up at an inn to change horses, and by that time the situations were exactly reversed. The Frenchmen had forgotten all about the danger, and were chattering gaily ; the Englishmen had just begun to feel it, and one had a nervous breakdown.and was obliged to go to bed. We have here a clear physical difference between the two races-a difference that goes deep into character. The Frenchmen responded at once ; the Englishmen responded in time. They were slow and they were also practical. Their instinct forbade them to throw themselves about in the coach, because it was more likely to tip over if they did. They had this extraordinary appreciation of fact that we shall notice again and again. When a disaster comes, the English instinct is to do what can be done first, and to postpone the feeling as long as possible. Hence they are splendid at emergencies. No doubt they are brave-no one will deny that-but bravery is partly an affair of the nerves, and the English nervous system is well equipped for meeting a physical emergency. It acts promptly and feels slowly. Such a combination is fruitful, and anyone who possesses it has gone a long way toward being brave. And when the action is over, then the Englishman can feel.
There is one more consideration-a most important one. If the English nature is cold, how is it that it has produced a great literature and a literature that is particularly great in poetry ? Judged by its prose, English literature would not stand in the first rank. It is its poetry that raises it to the level of Greek, Persian, or French. And yet the English are supposed to be so unpoetical. How is this ? The nation that produced the Elizabethan drama and the Lake Poets cannot be a cold, unpoetical nation. We can't get fire out of ice. Since literature always rests upon national character, there must be in the English nature hidden springs of fire to produce the fire we see. The warm sympathy, the romance, the imagination, that we look for

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE coach, containing some Englishmen and some Frenchmen, was driving over what is Alps. what is horses ran away, and as they were dashing across a bridge what is coach caught on what is stonework, tottered, and nearly fell into what is ravine below. what is Frenchmen were frantic with terror : they screamed and gesticulated and flung themselves about, as Frenchmen would. what is Englishmen sat quite calm. An hour later what is coach drew up at an inn to change horses, and by that time what is situations were exactly reversed. what is Frenchmen had forgotten all about what is danger, and were chattering gaily ; what is Englishmen had just begun to feel it, and one had a nervous breakdown.and was obliged to go to bed. We have here a clear physical difference between what is two races-a difference that goes deep into character. what is Frenchmen responded at once ; what is Englishmen responded in time. They were slow and they were also practical. Their where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 7 where is strong PART I - what is PRESENT CHAPTER I - NOTES ON what is ENGLISH CHARACTER where is p align="justify" coach, containing some Englishmen and some Frenchmen, was driving over what is Alps. what is horses ran away, and as they were dashing across a bridge what is coach caught on what is stonework, tottered, and nearly fell into what is ravine below. what is Frenchmen were frantic with terror : they screamed and gesticulated and flung themselves about, as Frenchmen would. what is Englishmen sat quite calm. An hour later what is coach drew up at an inn to change horses, and by that time what is situations were exactly reversed. what is Frenchmen had forgotten all about what is danger, and were chattering gaily ; what is Englishmen had just begun to feel it, and one had a nervous breakdown.and was obliged to go to bed. We have here a clear physical difference between what is two races-a difference that goes deep into character. what is Frenchmen responded at once ; what is Englishmen responded in time. They were slow and they were also practical. Their instinct forbade them to throw themselves about in what is coach, because it was more likely to tip over if they did. They had this extraordinary appreciation of fact that we shall notice again and again. When a disaster comes, what is English instinct is to do what can be done first, and to postpone what is feeling as long as possible. Hence they are splendid at emergencies. No doubt they are brave-no one will deny that-but bravery is partly an affair of what is nerves, and what is English nervous system is well equipped for meeting a physical emergency. It acts promptly and feels slowly. Such a combination is fruitful, and anyone who possesses it has gone a long way toward being brave. And when what is action is over, then what is Englishman can feel. There is one more consideration-a most important one. If what is English nature is cold, how is it that it has produced a great literature and a literature that is particularly great in poetry ? Judged by its prose, English literature would not stand in what is first rank. It is its poetry that raises it to what is level of Greek, Persian, or French. And yet what is English are supposed to be so unpoetical. How is this ? what is nation that produced what is Elizabethan drama and what is Lake Poets cannot be a cold, unpoetical nation. We can't get fire out of ice. Since literature always rests upon national character, there must be in what is English nature hidden springs of fire to produce what is fire we see. what is warm sympathy, what is romance, what is imagination, that we look for where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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