Books > Old Books > A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914)


Page 6

PART I - THE PRESENT
CHAPTER I - NOTES ON THE ENGLISH CHARACTER

them like potatoes, but it is better than slopping them about like water from a pail, which is what you did.' He did not like the simile of the pail. ` If those are your opinions, they part us forever,' he cried, and left the room. Returning immediately, he added :` No-but your whole attitude toward emotion is wrong. Emotion has nothing to do with appropriateness. It matters only that it shall be sincere. I happened to feel deeply. I showed it. It doesn't matter whether I ought to have felt deeply or not.'
This remark impressed me very much. Yet I could not agree with it, and said that I valued emotion as much as he did, but used it differently ; if I poured it out on small occasions I was afraid of having none left for the great ones, and of being bankrupt at the crises of life. Note the word ' bankrupt.' I spoke as a member of a prudent middle-class nation, always anxious to meet my liabilities. But my friend spoke as an Oriental, and the Oriental has behind him a tradition, not of middle-class prudence, but of kingly munificence and splendour. He feels his resources are endless, just as John Bull feels his are finite. As regards material resources, the Oriental is clearly unwise. Money isn't endless. If we spend or give away all the money we have, we haven't any more, and must take the consequences, which are frequently unpleasant. But, as regards the resources of the spirit, he may be right. The emotions may be endless. The more we express them, the more we may have to express.

True love in this differs from gold and clay,
That to divide is not to take away,

says Shelley. Shelley, at all events, believes that the wealth. of the spirit is endless ; that we may express it copiously, passionately, and always ; and that we can never feel sorrow or joy too acutely.
In the above anecdote, I have figured as a typical Englishman. I will now descend from that dizzy and somewhat unfamiliar height, and return to my business of note-taking. A note on the slowness of the English character. The Englishman appears to be cold and unemotional because he is really slow. When an event happens, he may understand it quickly enough with his mind, but he takes quite a while to feel it. Once upon a time a

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE them like potatoes, but it is better than slopping them about like water from a pail, which is what you did.' He did not like what is simile of what is pail. ` If those are your opinions, they part us forever,' he cried, and left what is room. Returning immediately, he added :` No-but your whole attitude toward emotion is wrong. Emotion has nothing to do with appropriateness. It matters only that it shall be sincere. I happened to feel deeply. I showed it. It doesn't matter whether I ought to have felt deeply or not.' This remark impressed me very much. Yet I could not agree with it, and said that I valued emotion as much as he did, but used it differently ; if I poured it out on small occasions I was afraid of having none left for what is great ones, and of being bankrupt at what is crises of life. Note what is word ' bankrupt.' I spoke as a member of a prudent middle-class nation, always anxious to meet my li where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 6 where is strong PART I - what is PRESENT CHAPTER I - NOTES ON what is ENGLISH CHARACTER where is p align="justify" them like potatoes, but it is better than slopping them about like water from a pail, which is what you did.' He did not like what is simile of what is pail. ` If those are your opinions, they part us forever,' he cried, and left what is room. Returning immediately, he added :` No-but your whole attitude toward emotion is wrong. Emotion has nothing to do with appropriateness. It matters only that it shall be sincere. I happened to feel deeply. I showed it. It doesn't matter whether I ought to have felt deeply or not.' This remark impressed me very much. Yet I could not agree with it, and said that I valued emotion as much as he did, but used it differently ; if I poured it out on small occasions I was afraid of having none left for what is great ones, and of being bankrupt at what is crises of life. Note what is word ' bankrupt.' I spoke as a member of a prudent middle-class nation, always anxious to meet my liabilities. But my friend spoke as an Oriental, and what is Oriental has behind him a tradition, not of middle-class prudence, but of kingly munificence and splendour. He feels his resources are endless, just as John Bull feels his are finite. As regards material resources, what is Oriental is clearly unwise. Money isn't endless. If we spend or give away all what is money we have, we haven't any more, and must take what is consequences, which are frequently unpleasant. But, as regards what is resources of what is spirit, he may be right. what is emotions may be endless. The more we express them, what is more we may have to express. True what time is it in this differs from gold and clay, That to divide is not to take away, says Shelley. Shelley, at all events, believes that what is wealth. of what is spirit is endless ; that we may express it copiously, passionately, and always ; and that we can never feel sorrow or joy too acutely. In what is above anecdote, I have figured as a typical Englishman. I will now descend from that dizzy and somewhat unfamiliar height, and return to my business of note-taking. A note on what is slowness of what is English character. what is Englishman appears to be cold and unemotional because he is really slow. When an event happens, he may understand it quickly enough with his mind, but he takes quite a while to feel it. Once upon a time a where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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