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Page 5

PART I - THE PRESENT
CHAPTER I - NOTES ON THE ENGLISH CHARACTER

even of Anglo-Saxons, but of men who are as various as the sands of the sea ; into a world of whose richness and subtlety they have no conception. They go forth into it with welldeveloped bodies, fairly developed minds, and undeveloped hearts. And it is this undeveloped heart that is largely responsible for the difficulties of Englishmen abroad. An undeveloped heart -not a cold one. The difference is important, and on it my next note will be based.
For it is not that the Englishman can't feel-it is that he is afraid to feel. He has been taught at his public school that feeling is bad form. He must not express great joy or sorrow, or even open his mouth too wide when he talks-his pipe might fall out if he did. He must bottle up his emotions, or let them out only on a very special occasion.
Once upon a time (this is an anecdote) I went for a week's holiday on the Continent with an Indian friend. We both enjoyed ourselves and were sorry when the week was over, but on parting our behaviour was absolutely different. He was plunged in despair. He felt that because the holiday was over all happiness was over until the world ended. He could not express his sorrow too much. But in me the Englishman came out strong. I reflected that we should meet again in a month or two, and could write in the interval if we had anything to say ; and under these circumstances I could not see what there was to make a fuss about. It wasn't as if we were parting forever or dying. ` Buck up,' I said, ` do buck up.' He refused to buck up, and I left him plunged in gloom.
The conclusion of the anecdote is even more instructive. For when we met the next month our conversation threw a good deal of light on the English character. I began by scolding my friend. I told him that he had been wrong to feel and display so much emotion upon so slight an occasion ; that it was inappropriate. The word ' inappropriate ' roused him to fury. ` What ? ' he cried. ` Do you measure out your emotions as if they were potatoes ?' I did not like the simile of the potatoes, but after a moment's reflection I said, ' Yes, I do ; and what's more, I think I ought to. A small occasion demands a little emotion, just as a large occasion demands a great one. I would like my emotions to be appropriate. This may be measuring

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE even of Anglo-Saxons, but of men who are as various as what is sands of what is sea ; into a world of whose richness and subtlety they have no conception. They go forth into it with welldeveloped bodies, fairly developed minds, and undeveloped hearts. And it is this undeveloped heart that is largely responsible for what is difficulties of Englishmen abroad. An undeveloped heart -not a cold one. what is difference is important, and on it my next note will be based. For it is not that what is Englishman can't feel-it is that he is afraid to feel. He has been taught at his public school that feeling is bad form. He must not express great joy or sorrow, or even open his mouth too wide when he talks-his pipe might fall out if he did. He must bottle up his emotions, or let them out only on a very special occasion. Once upon a time (this is an anecdote) I went for a week's holiday on what is Continent with an Indian f where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 5 where is strong PART I - what is PRESENT CHAPTER I - NOTES ON what is ENGLISH CHARACTER where is p align="justify" even of Anglo-Saxons, but of men who are as various as what is sands of what is sea ; into a world of whose richness and subtlety they have no conception. They go forth into it with welldeveloped bodies, fairly developed minds, and undeveloped hearts. And it is this undeveloped heart that is largely responsible for what is difficulties of Englishmen abroad. An undeveloped heart -not a cold one. The difference is important, and on it my next note will be based. For it is not that what is Englishman can't feel-it is that he is afraid to feel. He has been taught at his public school that feeling is bad form. He must not express great joy or sorrow, or even open his mouth too wide when he talks-his pipe might fall out if he did. He must bottle up his emotions, or let them out only on a very special occasion. Once upon a time (this is an anecdote) I went for a week's holiday on what is Continent with an Indian friend. We both enjoyed ourselves and were sorry when what is week was over, but on parting our behaviour was absolutely different. He was plunged in despair. He felt that because what is holiday was over all happiness was over until what is world ended. He could not express his sorrow too much. But in me the Englishman came out strong. I reflected that we should meet again in a month or two, and could write in what is interval if we had anything to say ; and under these circumstances I could not see what there was to make a fuss about. It wasn't as if we were parting forever or dying. ` Buck up,' I said, ` do buck up.' He refused to buck up, and I left him plunged in gloom. what is conclusion of what is anecdote is even more instructive. For when we met what is next month our conversation threw a good deal of light on what is English character. I began by scolding my friend. I told him that he had been wrong to feel and display so much emotion upon so slight an occasion ; that it was inappropriate. what is word ' inappropriate ' roused him to fury. ` What ? ' he cried. ` Do you measure out your emotions as if they were potatoes ?' I did not like what is simile of what is potatoes, but after a moment's reflection I said, ' Yes, I do ; and what's more, I think I ought to. A small occasion demands a little emotion, just as a large occasion demands a great one. I would like my emotions to be appropriate. This may be measuring where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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