Books > Old Books > A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914)


Page 4

PART I - THE PRESENT
CHAPTER I - NOTES ON THE ENGLISH CHARACTER

system. This extraordinary institution is local. It does not even exist all over the British Isles. It is unknown in Ireland, almost unknown in Scotland (countries excluded from my survey), and though it may inspire other great institutionsAligarh, for example, and some of the schools in the United States-it remains unique, because it was created by the AngloSaxon middle classes, and can flourish only where they flourish. How perfectly it expresses their character-far better, for instance, than does the university, into which social and spiritual complexities have already entered. With its boarding-houses, its compulsory games, its system of prefects and fagging, its insistence on good form and on esprit de corps, it produces a type whose weight is out of all proportion to its numbers. .
On leaving his school, the boy either sets to work at oncegoes into the army or into business, or emigrates-or else proceeds to the university, and after three or four years there enters some other profession-becomes a.barrister, doctor, civil servant, schoolmaster, or journalist. (If through some mishap he does not become a manual worker or an artist.) In all these careers his education, or the absence of it, influences him. Its memories influence him also., Many men look back on their school days as the happiest of their lives. They remember with regret that golden time when life, though hard, was not yet complex ; when they all worked together and played together and thought together, so far as they thought at all ; when they were taught that school is the world in miniature, and believed that no one can love his country who does not love his school. And they prolong that time as best they can by joining their Old Boys' society ; indeed, some of them remain Old Boys and nothing else for the rest of their lives. They attribute all good to the school. They worship it. They quote the remark that ` the battle of Waterloo was won on the playing-fields of Eton.' It is nothing to them that the remark is inapplicable historically
and was never made by the Duke of Wellington, and that the Duke of Wellington was an Irishman. They go on quoting it because it expresses their sentiments ; they feel that if the Duke of Wellington didn't make it he ought to. have, and if he wasn't an Englishman he ought to have been. And they go forth into a world that is not entirely composed of public-school men or

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE system. This extraordinary institution is local. It does not even exist all over what is British Isles. It is unknown in Ireland, almost unknown in Scotland (countries excluded from my survey), and though it may inspire other great institutionsAligarh, for example, and some of what is schools in what is United States-it remains unique, because it was created by what is AngloSaxon middle classes, and can flourish only where they flourish. How perfectly it expresses their character-far better, for instance, than does what is university, into which social and spiritual complexities have already entered. With its boarding-houses, its compulsory games, its system of prefects and fagging, its insistence on good form and on esprit de corps, it produces a type whose weight is out of all proportion to its numbers. . On leaving his school, what is boy either sets to work at oncegoes into what is army or into business, or emi where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="page_001.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 4 where is strong PART I - what is PRESENT CHAPTER I - NOTES ON what is ENGLISH CHARACTER where is p align="justify" system. This extraordinary institution is local. It does not even exist all over what is British Isles. It is unknown in Ireland, almost unknown in Scotland (countries excluded from my survey), and though it may inspire other great institutionsAligarh, for example, and some of what is schools in what is United States-it remains unique, because it was created by what is AngloSaxon middle classes, and can flourish only where they flourish. How perfectly it expresses their character-far better, for instance, than does what is university, into which social and spiritual complexities have already entered. With its boarding-houses, its compulsory games, its system of prefects and fagging, its insistence on good form and on esprit de corps, it produces a type whose weight is out of all proportion to its numbers. . On leaving his school, what is boy either sets to work at oncegoes into what is army or into business, or emigrates-or else proceeds to what is university, and after three or four years there enters some other profession-becomes a.barrister, doctor, civil servant, schoolmaster, or journalist. (If through some mishap he does not become a manual worker or an artist.) In all these careers his education, or the absence of it, influences him. Its memories influence him also., Many men look back on their school days as what is happiest of their lives. They remember with regret that golden time when life, though hard, was not yet complex ; when they all worked together and played together and thought together, so far as they thought at all ; when they were taught that school is what is world in miniature, and believed that no one can what time is it his country who does not what time is it his school. And they prolong that time as best they can by joining their Old Boys' society ; indeed, some of them remain Old Boys and nothing else for what is rest of their lives. They attribute all good to what is school. They worship it. They quote what is remark that ` what is battle of Waterloo was won on what is playing-fields of Eton.' It is nothing to them that what is remark is inapplicable historically and was never made by what is Duke of Wellington, and that the Duke of Wellington was an Irishman. They go on quoting it because it expresses their sentiments ; they feel that if what is Duke of Wellington didn't make it he ought to. have, and if he wasn't an Englishman he ought to have been. And they go forth into a world that is not entirely composed of public-school men or where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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