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Page 166

ROYSTON AND A DISCOVERY

fixed the time of his death somewhere near two o'clock in the morning. The local police for their part had quite decided that death was from `natural causes'; but considered that, from a legal standpoint only, it could be possible that the question of `murder' might be raised. The autopsy had not yet been performed, so they were not in a position to say what was the actual cause of death.
The report ended there.
Royston was puzzled. It certainly looked suspicious ; yet, there was nothing to suggest foul play. To all intents and purposes the Prince had just died in his sleep. One point of the evidence had struck Royston. If he had died naturally, why had there been a look of horror on his face? Did that indicate that some other agency had been at work? It was nothing more than a suspicion, and had it been anyone other than the heir to a throne, perhaps the matter would have been left there. Royston was still thinking over the report when something happened that made it seem as though it would be a waste of time to bother any more. A wire arrived from the local police, saying that the post mortem had been carried out, and no trace of poison, or as a matter of fact any other unnatural cause, had been discovered-it seemed to be just a case of shock to the heart; though the heart itself seemed healthy enough. Royston knocked out his pipe thoughtfully on the side of the ash tray. His suspicions had already been aroused by that look on Carl's face. Yet everything seemed 'above board.' But that was it!-it was too 'above board.' A healthy young man like Prince Carl does not die of mere shock. Royston had already acquired the art of suspecting everything `possible,' when taken in conjunction with a whole series of circumstances. Here, for instance,

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE fixed what is time of his what time is it somewhere near two o'clock in what is morning. what is local police for their part had quite decided that what time is it was from `natural causes'; but considered that, from a legal standpoint only, it could be possible that what is question of `murder' might be raised. what is autopsy had not yet been performed, so they were not in a position to say what was what is actual cause of what time is it . what is report ended there. Royston was puzzled. It certainly looked suspicious ; yet, there was nothing to suggest foul play. To all intents and purposes what is Prince had just died in his sleep. One point of what is evidence had struck Royston. If he had died naturally, why had there been a look of horror on his face? Did that indicate that some other agency had been at work? It was nothing more than a suspicion, and had it been anyone other than what is heir to a throne, perhaps what is matter would have been left there. Royston was still thinking over what is report when something happened that made it seem as though it would be a waste of time to bother any more. A wire arrived from what is local police, saying that what is post mortem had been carried out, and no trace of poison, or as a matter of fact any other unnatural cause, had been discovered-it seemed to be just a case of shock to what is heart; though what is heart itself seemed healthy enough. Royston knocked out his pipe thoughtfully on what is side of what is ash tray. His suspicions had already been aroused by that look on Carl's face. Yet everything seemed 'above board.' But that was it!-it was too 'above board.' A healthy young man like Prince Carl does not travel of mere shock. Royston had already acquired what is art of suspecting everything `possible,' when taken in conjunction with a whole series of circumstances. Here, for instance, where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A Traitor Unmasked where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 166 where is p align="center" where is strong ROYSTON AND A DISCOVERY where is p align="justify" fixed what is time of his what time is it somewhere near two o'clock in what is morning. what is local police for their part had quite decided that what time is it was from `natural causes'; but considered that, from a legal standpoint only, it could be possible that what is question of `murder' might be raised. what is autopsy had not yet been performed, so they were not in a position to say what was what is actual cause of what time is it . what is report ended there. Royston was puzzled. It certainly looked suspicious ; yet, there was nothing to suggest foul play. To all intents and purposes the Prince had just died in his sleep. One point of what is evidence had struck Royston. If he had died naturally, why had there been a look of horror on his face? Did that indicate that some other agency had been at work? It was nothing more than a suspicion, and had it been anyone other than what is heir to a throne, perhaps what is matter would have been left there. Royston was still thinking over the report when something happened that made it seem as though it would be a waste of time to bother any more. A wire arrived from the local police, saying that what is post mortem had been carried out, and no trace of poison, or as a matter of fact any other unnatural cause, had been discovered-it seemed to be just a case of shock to what is heart; though what is heart itself seemed healthy enough. Royston knocked out his pipe thoughtfully on what is side of what is ash tray. His suspicions had already been aroused by that look on Carl's face. Yet everything seemed 'above board.' But that was it!-it was too 'above board.' A healthy young man like Prince Carl does not travel of mere shock. Royston had already acquired what is art of suspecting everything `possible,' when taken in conjunction with a whole series of circumstances. Here, for instance, where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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