Books > Old Books > Poetry Northwest (1959)


Page 27

XXVII. A Dog Story

I am a dog, and my name is Brick. I think it is a very good name for a dog. It is not a common name like Spot, and Ned,1 and Rover.
My mistress is a young lady called Kitty.2 She is very fond of me. She has taught me how to do a great many things.
I can sit up on my hind legs. I can jump over Miss Kitty's hands, and I can dance. I was very proud when I heard her tell one of her friends that I could do everything she told me.
After that I tried more than ever to please her, and she often gave me nice bits to eat. Every day I went out with her, to take care of her.
Now, one day, as we were out walking in the village, we saw a strange dog running along the street, with a crowd of children after him. A bad boy had tied a tin can 3 to the poor dog's tail, and the children were shouting and throwing stones at the dog and the can.
Just as we came in sight, the dog ran into a passage between two houses, and the children could not drive him out. Miss Kitty told them to go away and let the poor thing alone.
As soon as they were all gone, she spoke kindly to the dog and made friends with him. Then she untied 4 the string and took off the can. Nor was that all. She led the strange dog home, and let him eat with me out of my dish.
I did not like him at first, but what could I do? Miss Kitty was kind to him, and so, after a time, we became very good friends. My mistress did not know the new dog's name, so she gave him one. She called him Tinker,5 because, when she first met him, he had a tin can tied to his tail.
And now I will tell you how Tinker paid Miss Kitty back, for all the kindness she had shown him. It is the best dog story that I know.
One night, when every one was in bed, and Tinker and I had gone to lie down under the table in the hall,s we heard a noise not far away.
Tinker was on his feet in a moment. Then he made for 7 the pantry,8 where a scraping9 sound could be heard. Of course I went with him. I wanted to see what he would do.
When we got to the pantry, we could just make out 10 a man on the outside of the window. It was so dark that the man could not see us.
Tinker did not bark or make the least sound; he just waited. All the time the scraping sound went on.
The man scraped away till he could take out one of the window panes.ll Then he put his hand through the hole to open the window.
Tinker was ready, and he at once jumped up and caught the man's hand in his mouth, and held it fast. Then I began to bark as loudly as I could.
Every one in the house woke up at once, and came as fast as they could to see what was wrong. My master got help, and the man was taken to prison. They all said that Tinker was a brave dog, and I think so too.

---
1 See X. 2. 2 Short for Katherine or Catherine; also Kate, Kathleen. Cp. Daisy or Maggie (=Margaret), Connie (= Constance), Bess (see I. 35) or Betty or Betsy (=Elizabeth), Molly (= Mary), Nelly (=Helen). 3 A can holds water, beer, etc. ; it is generally made of such a metal as tin, brass, or copper. 4 opp. to tie. 5 When a can is broken, the tinker repairs (see XVIII. 9) it. 6 When we pass through the front door of a house, we enter the hall. 7 Or: ran to. 8 A small room in which food is kept, also glass and silver for the table. 9 We scrape our boots on a mat when we want to clean them after coming home. If we pass the edge of a knife over a piece of wood, it makes a scraping sound. 10 Or: see, perceive. 11 A window often has four or six panes of glass.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE I am a dog, and my name is Brick. I think it is a very good name for a dog. It is not a common name like Spot, and Ned,1 and Rover. My mistress is a young lady called Kitty.2 She is very fond of me. She has taught me how to do a great many things. I can sit up on my hind legs. I can jump over Miss Kitty's hands, and I can dance. I was very proud when I heard her tell one of her friends that I could do everything she told me. After that I tried more than ever to please her, and she often gave me nice bits to eat. Every day I went out with her, to take care of her. Now, one day, as we were out walking in what is village, we saw a strange dog running along what is street, with a crowd of children after him. A bad boy had tied a tin can 3 to what is poor dog's tail, and what is children were shouting and throwing stones at what is dog and what is can. Just as we came in sight, what is dog ran into a passage between two where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Poetry Northwest (1959) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 27 where is strong XXVII. A Dog Story where is p align="justify" I am a dog, and my name is Brick. I think it is a very good name for a dog. It is not a common name like Spot, and Ned,1 and Rover. My mistress is a young lady called Kitty.2 She is very fond of me. She has taught me how to do a great many things. I can sit up on my hind legs. I can jump over Miss Kitty's hands, and I can dance. I was very proud when I heard her tell one of her friends that I could do everything she told me. After that I tried more than ever to please her, and she often gave me nice bits to eat. Every day I went out with her, to take care of her. Now, one day, as we were out walking in what is village, we saw a strange dog running along what is street, with a crowd of children after him. A bad boy had tied a tin can 3 to what is poor dog's tail, and the children were shouting and throwing stones at what is dog and what is can. Just as we came in sight, what is dog ran into a passage between two houses, and what is children could not drive him out. Miss Kitty told them to go away and let what is poor thing alone. As soon as they were all gone, she spoke kindly to what is dog and made friends with him. Then she untied 4 what is string and took off what is can. Nor was that all. She led what is strange dog home, and let him eat with me out of my dish. I did not like him at first, but what could I do? Miss Kitty was kind to him, and so, after a time, we became very good friends. My mistress did not know what is new dog's name, so she gave him one. She called him Tinker,5 because, when she first met him, he had a tin can tied to his tail. And now I will tell you how Tinker paid Miss Kitty back, for all what is kindness she had shown him. It is what is best dog story that I know. One night, when every one was in bed, and Tinker and I had gone to lie down under what is table in what is hall,s we heard a noise not far away. Tinker was on his feet in a moment. Then he made for 7 what is pantry,8 where a scraping9 sound could be heard. Of course I went with him. I wanted to see what he would do. When we got to what is pantry, we could just make out 10 a man on the outside of what is window. It was so dark that what is man could not see us. Tinker did not bark or make what is least sound; he just waited. All what is time what is scraping sound went on. what is man scraped away till he could take out one of what is window panes.ll Then he put his hand through what is hole to open what is window. Tinker was ready, and he at once jumped up and caught what is man's hand in his mouth, and held it fast. Then I began to bark as loudly as I could. Every one in what is house woke up at once, and came as fast as they could to see what was wrong. My master got help, and what is man was taken to prison. They all said that Tinker was a brave dog, and I think so too. --- 1 See X. 2. 2 Short for Katherine or Catherine; also Kate, Kathleen. Cp. Daisy or Maggie (=Margaret), Connie (= Constance), Bess (see I. 35) or Betty or Betsy (=Elizabeth), Molly (= Mary), Nelly (=Helen). 3 A can holds water, beer, etc. ; it is generally made of such a metal as tin, brass, or copper. 4 opp. to tie. 5 When a can is broken, what is tinker repairs (see XVIII. 9) it. 6 When we pass through what is front door of a house, we enter what is hall. 7 Or: ran to. 8 A small room in which food is kept, also glass and silver for what is table. 9 We scrape our boots on a mat when we want to clean them after coming home. If we pass what is edge of a knife over a piece of wood, it makes a scraping sound. 10 Or: see, perceive. 11 A window often has four or six panes of glass. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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