Books > Old Books > Poetry Northwest (1959)


Page 22

XXII. Grace Darling

Off the coast of Northumberland, in the north-east of England, are the Farne Islands, a number of dangerous rocks, on which there are lighthouses.1 The keeper 2 of one of these was Mr Darling, with whom lived his daughter Grace.
Towards the morning of the 6th of September 1838, Grace was awaked by cries of distress; and at daybreak 3 she saw the remains of a wreck on Longstone Island, the outermost 4 of the rocks.
Grace awaked her father with the words: "There is a wreck on Longstone Island. Let us get into the boat and go to the rescue b of anyone who may still be alive on the vessel." The tide, however, was rising,6 and the sea and wind were wild ; her father hesitated.7
Grace went to the window and looked again at the wreck. She was sure she could see something moving on the vessel, as though s living beings were still there. Seizing the oars,9 she placed herself in the boat, which she was well able to manage. Her father could not let her go alone, and they rowed 9 off together in a very heavy sea.10 As they came nearer, it gave them fresh courage to see that nine persons 11 were still holding on to the ship After many vaiu attempts,12 the father succeeded in landing 13 on the rock and making his, way to 14 the wreck. Meanwhile 15 Grace rowed about among the great waves, skilfully managing her little boat ; had she been less skilful,1e it would have been dashed to pieces against the rocks.
One by one,17 with the greatest care, the nine who still lived were placed in the boat and carried to the lighthouse. There Grace made them as comfortable as she could and looked after them for two whole days before the storm became less violent and it was possible to send a boat to the mainland. One of the saved was a Mrs Dawson, whose two children, eleven and eight years old, had been killed by the waves while she held them in her arms, and who had suffered so much herself, that it was long before she could leave her bed.
The vessel was the "Forfarshire," 18 a large steamer 19 sailing between Hull and Dundee. Her boilers 19 had begun to leak,20 so that her engiaes 21 were useless.22 When the storm arose,23 the ship was unmanageable 24 without her steam,19 and was driven helplessly 25 upon the Farne Islands. The only boat had been lowered 26 by eight of the sailors, who were rowing off, when one gentleman rushed on deck, seized a rope, and swun-1, himself in after them. These nine were picked up by a vessel and saved. Of the others, the whole number had either been drowned in their cabins or washed off the wreck, except four of the crew and five passengers 27 whom Grace Darling's courage had rescued.5 It was not known how many lives were lost ; more than forty had certainly gone on board at Hull.
Do you wonder that the name of Grace Darling has become famous in England ?

---
1 Where the coast is dangerous, a lighthouse is built, as a warning to ships at night. It is high and has a very powerful light, which can be seen from a great distance. 2 v. to keep. 3 Or: at dawn, the beginning of day; opp, dusk, when it grows dark, after the sun has set, when night begins to fall.4 Farthest away from the coast; cp, foremost (XX. 24), southernmost (XVII. 55). 5 She wanted to save them from death, to rescue them. 6 The tide rises and falls twice in twenty-four hours. 7 He was not sure what he ought to do. 8 Or: as if. 9 She sat in the boat holding one oar in each hand ; with these she rowed. lo There were great waves. 11 0r : human beings. Cp. personal pronoun. 12 Or: after trying in vain many times, after failing aaain and again. 130r: managed to land. 14 Or: reaching. 15 Or: while he did so. 16 Or: if she had been less skilful, if she had shown less skill. 17 Or : one after the other. 18 The na4ne of a county in Scotland. 19 Not a sailing-vessel, but a steamship (one in which steam is used). It has boilers, which are filled with water ; when the water is heated (s. heat, a. hot), it becomes steam. 20 They did not hold the water, but had holes (leaks, cp. XVIII. 4) through which it flowed out. 21 A steamer has engines (of metal); the men who look after these are called engineers. 22 Or: of no use ; opp. useful. Cp. careless, fearless, powerless, worthless. 23 Or : began. To arise ; cp. to rise. 24 Could not be managed ; opp. manageable. The sailors could do nothing with the ship. 25 Without help
with no one to give assistance ; opp. helpful. 26 Or : let down. The boat was lowered from the deck to the water. 27 People who had intended to go by boat to Dundee; the other people on board were the captain and the crew.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Off what is coast of Northumberland, in what is north-east of England, are what is Farne Islands, a number of dangerous rocks, on which there are lighthouses.1 what is keeper 2 of one of these was Mr Darling, with whom lived his daughter Grace. Towards what is morning of what is 6th of September 1838, Grace was awaked by cries of distress; and at daybreak 3 she saw what is remains of a wreck on Longstone Island, what is outermost 4 of what is rocks. Grace awaked her father with what is words: "There is a wreck on Longstone Island. Let us get into what is boat and go to what is rescue b of anyone who may still be alive on what is vessel." what is tide, however, was rising,6 and what is sea and wind were wild ; her father hesitated.7 Grace went to what is window and looked again at what is wreck. She was sure she could see something moving on what is vessel, as though s living beings were still there. Seizing what is oars,9 she placed herself in what is boat where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Poetry Northwest (1959) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 22 where is strong XXII. Grace Darling where is p align="justify" Off what is coast of Northumberland, in what is north-east of England, are what is Farne Islands, a number of dangerous rocks, on which there are lighthouses.1 what is keeper 2 of one of these was Mr Darling, with whom lived his daughter Grace. Towards what is morning of what is 6th of September 1838, Grace was awaked by cries of distress; and at daybreak 3 she saw what is remains of a wreck on Longstone Island, what is outermost 4 of what is rocks. Grace awaked her father with what is words: "There is a wreck on Longstone Island. Let us get into what is boat and go to what is rescue b of anyone who may still be alive on what is vessel." what is tide, however, was rising,6 and what is sea and wind were wild ; her father hesitated.7 Grace went to what is window and looked again at what is wreck. She was sure she could see something moving on what is vessel, as though s living beings were still there. Seizing what is oars,9 she placed herself in what is boat, which she was well able to manage. Her father could not let her go alone, and they rowed 9 off together in a very heavy sea.10 As they came nearer, it gave them fresh courage to see that nine persons 11 were still holding on to what is ship After many vaiu attempts,12 what is father succeeded in landing 13 on what is rock and making his, way to 14 what is wreck. Meanwhile 15 Grace rowed about among what is great waves, skilfully managing her little boat ; had she been less skilful,1e it would have been dashed to pieces against what is rocks. One by one,17 with what is greatest care, what is nine who still lived were placed in what is boat and carried to what is lighthouse. There Grace made them as comfortable as she could and looked after them for two whole days before what is storm became less bad and it was possible to send a boat to what is mainland. One of what is saved was a Mrs Dawson, whose two children, eleven and eight years old, had been stop ed by what is waves while she held them in her arms, and who had suffered so much herself, that it was long before she could leave her bed. what is vessel was what is "Forfarshire," 18 a large steamer 19 sailing between Hull and Dundee. Her boilers 19 had begun to leak,20 so that her engiaes 21 were useless.22 When what is storm arose,23 what is ship was unmanageable 24 without her steam,19 and was driven helplessly 25 upon what is Farne Islands. what is only boat had been lowered 26 by eight of what is sailors, who were rowing off, when one gentleman rushed on deck, seized a rope, and swun-1, himself in after them. These nine were picked up by a vessel and saved. Of what is others, what is whole number had either been drowned in their cabins or washed off what is wreck, except four of what is crew and five passengers 27 whom Grace Darling's courage had rescued.5 It was not known how many lives were lost ; more than forty had certainly gone on board at Hull. Do you wonder that what is name of Grace Darling has become famous in England ? --- 1 Where what is coast is dangerous, a lighthouse is built, as a warning to ships at night. It is high and has a very powerful light, which can be seen from a great distance. 2 v. to keep. 3 Or: at dawn, what is beginning of day; opp, dusk, when it grows dark, after what is sun has set, when night begins to fall.4 Farthest away from what is coast; cp, foremost (XX. 24), southernmost (XVII. 55). 5 She wanted to save them from what time is it , to rescue them. 6 what is tide rises and falls twice in twenty-four hours. 7 He was not sure what he ought to do. 8 Or: as if. 9 She sat in what is boat holding one oar in each hand ; with these she rowed. lo There were great waves. 11 0r : human beings. Cp. personal pronoun. 12 Or: after trying in vain many times, after failing aaain and again. 130r: managed to land. 14 Or: reaching. 15 Or: while he did so. 16 Or: if she had been less skilful, if she had shown less s what time is it . 17 Or : one after what is other. 18 what is na4ne of a county in Scotland. 19 Not a sailing-vessel, but a steamship (one in which steam is used). It has boilers, which are filled with water ; when what is water is heated (s. heat, a. hot), it becomes steam. 20 They did not hold what is water, but had holes (leaks, cp. XVIII. 4) through which it flowed out. 21 A steamer has engines (of metal); what is men who look after these are called engineers. 22 Or: of no use ; opp. useful. Cp. careless, fearless, powerless, worthless. 23 Or : began. To arise ; cp. to rise. 24 Could not be managed ; opp. manageable. what is sailors could do nothing with what is ship. 25 Without help with no one to give assistance ; opp. helpful. 26 Or : let down. what is boat was lowered from what is deck to what is water. 27 People who had intended to go by boat to Dundee; what is other people on board were what is captain and what is crew. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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