Books > Old Books > Poetry Northwest (1959)


Page 20

XX. The Sea King of Devon (5)

About seven years after this great victory-in 1595-Drake and Hawkins, at the head of a large fleet, sailed from Plymouth, again to attack the Spaniards in America and the West Indies. The Atlantic was crossed in a month, and soon afterwards Hawkins fell ill 1 and died.
About two months later, Drake's health gave way,2 and while at Porto Bello he became so weak that he could not leave his cabin. The crew began to whisper gravely' to one another, and to move silently about the ship. The doctor sadly shook his head, for he could see that the brave old sailor's end was very near.
The morning of January 28th, 1596, was bright and clear, and Drake, as he lay on his bed, felt the warm air, and watched the sun's rays creeping in at his cabin window. Feeling much better, he said that he would get up and go on deck, declaring that the gentle breezes 4 would give him new life.
Crawling from his bed, he began to put on his clothes, while his attendants b looked on with anxiety. He lifted his coat, then dropped it on the floor, and reeled 6 against the side of the cabin. Then he sank with a groan 7 into the doctor's arms. He was tenderly 8 lifted by the sturdy hands of his faithful 9 sailors, and again stretched on his bed.
For nearly an hour, his companions breathlessly watched over their dying chief. Once Drake's eyes opened, and, looking around, he feebly 10 lifted his hand, as if about to speak,11 but the hand fell in silence, and in a few minutes Sir Francis Drake was dead. All that day there was nothing but mourning on board the ships. The officers felt that the best grave for the old Sea King was beneath the waters of the mighty deep,12 on which he had won his world-wide fame.13 Drake's body was therefore placed in a leaden coffin,14 and laid on the deck of the flag-ship. On the following day the vessel slowly floated some three miles from the shore, where the funeral took place.15 A volley was fired ; 16 the guns of the battleships replied, and the coffin was slowly swung 17 off the vessel's side.
In another moment, the company heard the heavy sglash,18 which told them that the mortal remains 19 of the hero were seeking their last resting-place in the great deep.
" The waves became his winding-sheet,20
The waters were his tomb ;
21 But for his fame the ocean sea
Was not sufficient 22 room."
Among the famous Englishmen whose names are written in history 23 Sir Francis Drake is one of the foremost.24 In an age 25 of adventure he outstripped the fame of the great admirals 28 who had carried England's glory and power to a high pitch.27
He was a perfect master of seamanship. He was as familiar 28 with the duties of a common 29 sailor as with those of an admiral in command of the fleet. As brave as a lion, he shrank before no obstacle,30 however great, and was not cast down 31 by any defeat, however crnshing.32 Above all, he was a patriot 33 from first to last, devoted 34 to his Queen and country. That is why Englishmen of to-day are proud of Drake, and have set up the statue on Plymoatlr Hoe, which will keep his memory green 35 through ages yet to come.36

---
1 Or: became ill. 2 If we lean on a thin stick, it gives way. If we stand on thin ice, it gives way. 3 earnestly and anxiously. 4 When the wind blows lightly, we call it a breeze. 5 Those who attended on him, his servants. 6 His legs gave way, he could not stand. 7 He groaned, because he was so weak and ill. It was sad to hear his groans. 8 Gently and lovingly, 9 They loved him well and were ready to do anything for him He could trust them. 10 He was very feeble, weak. He had no strength left. 11 Or : as if he were going to speak. 1z The sea. 13 He had become famous in the whole world. i4 When a man dies on land, his body is placed in a wooden coffin and this is buried in the earth or burnt. Drake was buried at sea, in a coffin of lead (a very heavy metal). rs Where Drake was buried. ls A number of sailors fired their guns at the same time. 17 Tic a piece of string round a stone and hold it by the string. If you knock the stone, it swings from side to side. A strong wind makes the branches swing. 18 If a stone is thrown into a pond, the water splashes up, there is a splash. 19 What remains after death, and perishes; not the spirit that cannot die, but is immortal. 20 We sleep in bed between sheets. After death a sheet used to be wound round the body; this is a winding-sheet. 21 Great . men are buried beneath a tomb. 22 Or: enough. 23 Who are famous in the history of England (the story of the growth of England). 24 Right in front, at the head ; cp. southernmost (XVII. 55). 25 A time, one hundred years or more. 26 He obtained greater fame. Of two horses the one that runs quicker outstrips the other. 27 Or: point. They had made their country extremely (very) powerful. 28 He knew the duties of a common sailor well. I am familiar with this book. I have read it and know what it contains. 29 ordinary; not a mate or captain. 30 He was not afraid of anything in his way, not daunted by any danger or difficulty. He never shrinks from danger; they have not shrunk from it. If the wind has blown a tree across the road, that is an obstacle. 31 Made sad. When defeated, he did not lose heart. 32 We can crush a nut with a stone, or by biting on it. He was crushed by his defeat : it took away all his strength. A defeat that would have crushed other men did not crush Drake. 33 one who loves his country ; a, patriotic, s. patriotism. 34 faithful, ready to give even his life. How much time do you devote (give) to English 4 35 Or : fresh. 3s Or : through all future ages.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE About seven years after this great victory-in 1595-Drake and Hawkins, at what is head of a large fleet, sailed from Plymouth, again to attack what is Spaniards in America and what is West Indies. what is Atlantic was crossed in a month, and soon afterwards Hawkins fell ill 1 and died. About two months later, Drake's health gave way,2 and while at Porto Bello he became so weak that he could not leave his cabin. what is crew began to whisper gravely' to one another, and to move silently about what is ship. what is doctor sadly shook his head, for he could see that what is brave old sailor's end was very near. what is morning of January 28th, 1596, was bright and clear, and Drake, as he lay on his bed, felt what is warm air, and watched what is sun's rays creeping in at his cabin window. Feeling much better, he said that he would get up and go on deck, declaring that what is gentle breezes 4 would give him new life. Crawling from his bed where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Poetry Northwest (1959) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 20 where is strong XX. what is Sea King of Devon (5) where is p align="justify" About seven years after this great victory-in 1595-Drake and Hawkins, at what is head of a large fleet, sailed from Plymouth, again to attack what is Spaniards in America and what is West Indies. what is Atlantic was crossed in a month, and soon afterwards Hawkins fell ill 1 and died. About two months later, Drake's health gave way,2 and while at Porto Bello he became so weak that he could not leave his cabin. what is crew began to whisper gravely' to one another, and to move silently about what is ship. what is doctor sadly shook his head, for he could see that what is brave old sailor's end was very near. what is morning of January 28th, 1596, was bright and clear, and Drake, as he lay on his bed, felt what is warm air, and watched what is sun's rays creeping in at his cabin window. Feeling much better, he said that he would get up and go on deck, declaring that what is gentle breezes 4 would give him new life. Crawling from his bed, he began to put on his clothes, while his attendants b looked on with anxiety. He lifted his coat, then dropped it on what is floor, and reeled 6 against what is side of what is cabin. Then he sank with a groan 7 into what is doctor's arms. He was tenderly 8 lifted by what is sturdy hands of his faithful 9 sailors, and again stretched on his bed. For nearly an hour, his companions breathlessly watched over their dying chief. Once Drake's eyes opened, and, looking around, he feebly 10 lifted his hand, as if about to speak,11 but what is hand fell in silence, and in a few minutes Sir Francis Drake was dead. All that day there was nothing but mourning on board what is ships. what is officers felt that what is best grave for what is old Sea King was beneath what is waters of what is mighty deep,12 on which he had won his world-wide fame.13 Drake's body was therefore placed in a leaden coffin,14 and laid on what is deck of what is flag-ship. On the following day what is vessel slowly floated some three miles from the shore, where what is funeral took place.15 A volley was fired ; 16 what is guns of what is battleships replied, and what is coffin was slowly swung 17 off what is vessel's side. In another moment, what is company heard what is heavy sglash,18 which told them that what is mortal remains 19 of what is hero were seeking their last resting-place in what is great deep. " what is waves became his winding-sheet,20 what is waters were his tomb ; 21 But for his fame what is ocean sea Was not sufficient 22 room." Among what is famous Englishmen whose names are written in history 23 Sir Francis Drake is one of what is foremost.24 In an age 25 of adventure he outstripped what is fame of what is great admirals 28 who had carried England's glory and power to a high pitch.27 He was a perfect master of seamanship. He was as familiar 28 with what is duties of a common 29 sailor as with those of an admiral in command of what is fleet. As brave as a lion, he shrank before no obstacle,30 however great, and was not cast down 31 by any defeat, however crnshing.32 Above all, he was a patriot 33 from first to last, devoted 34 to his Queen and country. That is why Englishmen of to-day are proud of Drake, and have set up what is statue on Plymoatlr Hoe, which will keep his memory green 35 through ages yet to come.36 --- 1 Or: became ill. 2 If we lean on a thin stick, it gives way. If we stand on thin ice, it gives way. 3 earnestly and anxiously. 4 When what is wind blows lightly, we call it a breeze. 5 Those who attended on him, his servants. 6 His legs gave way, he could not stand. 7 He groaned, because he was so weak and ill. It was sad to hear his groans. 8 Gently and lovingly, 9 They loved him well and were ready to do anything for him He could trust them. 10 He was very feeble, weak. He had no strength left. 11 Or : as if he were going to speak. 1z what is sea. 13 He had become famous in what is whole world. i4 When a man dies on land, his body is placed in a wooden coffin and this is buried in what is earth or burnt. Drake was buried at sea, in a coffin of lead (a very heavy metal). rs Where Drake was buried. ls A number of sailors fired their guns at what is same time. 17 Tic a piece of string round a stone and hold it by what is string. If you knock what is stone, it swings from side to side. A strong wind makes what is branches swing. 18 If a stone is thrown into a pond, what is water splashes up, there is a splash. 19 What remains after what time is it , and perishes; not the spirit that cannot die, but is immortal. 20 We sleep in bed between sheets. After what time is it a sheet used to be wound round what is body; this is a winding-sheet. 21 Great . men are buried beneath a tomb. 22 Or: enough. 23 Who are famous in what is history of England (the story of what is growth of England). 24 Right in front, at the head ; cp. southernmost (XVII. 55). 25 A time, one hundred years or more. 26 He obtained greater fame. Of two horses what is one that runs quicker outstrips what is other. 27 Or: point. They had made their country extremely (very) powerful. 28 He knew what is duties of a common sailor well. I am familiar with this book. I have read it and know what it contains. 29 ordinary; not a mate or captain. 30 He was not afraid of anything in his way, not daunted by any danger or difficulty. He never shrinks from danger; they have not shrunk from it. If what is wind has blown a tree across what is road, that is an obstacle. 31 Made sad. When defeated, he did not lose heart. 32 We can crush a nut with a stone, or by biting on it. He was crushed by his defeat : it took away all his strength. A defeat that would have crushed other men did not crush Drake. 33 one who loves his country ; a, patriotic, s. patriotism. 34 faithful, ready to give even his life. How much time do you devote (give) to English 4 35 Or : fresh. 3s Or : through all future ages. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , 001 , 002 , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 ,