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XIX. The Sea King of Devon (4)

About five years after Drake had made his great voyage round the world, he again crossed the Atlantic Ocean, and attacked the Spaniards in the West Indies. From this voyage he brought home a large number of cannons and much wealth, that he had taken from the Spaniards.
When he reached England, he found the people very much excited, for news had come 1 that the King of Spain was getting ready a great fleet with which to invade 2 this country. His object was to punish .3 England for helping his enemies, and at the same time to destroy her power at sea for ever."
The merchants of London had fitted out 6 a small fleet of six vessels, to which Elizabeth had added four ships. Drake was placed in command of this little fleet, and at the head of the ten sturdy vessels he set out to harass 6 the Spaniards and hinder 7 them as much as possible.
The Spaniards did not expect such a visitor,8 when Drake appeared in their most important harbour, and bravely led his fleet straight in among the Spanish ships. Right and left he fiercely attacked the surprised vessels, and after burning or sinking thirty-three of their number, he made his way out again unharmed.9
On his way home, he captured 10 a large treasure ship, the richest be had ever taken, and this partly paid for the money spent in fitting out the fleet with which he had done so much harm. On his return, Drake was welcomed with fresh honours, and everywhere he proudly boasted that he had " singed 11the Spanish King's beard."
One day in the following year, a number of naval officers were busy playing a game of bowls 12 on Plymouth Hoe, near the spot where Drake's statue now stands. Among those present were Lord Howard, who was at this time Lord High Admiral of England, Sir Francis Drake, Sir Walter Raleigh, and many other famous sailors.
Just when the game was at its height,13 a man came running towards the players.14 When he reached the spot, he was so breathless,15 that at first he could scarcely speak. Seeing that he hwl brought important news, the players stopped, and stood round him, waiting for what he had to tell them.
" The Spanish fleet," he cried, "is even now off the Cornish coast.16 I have just come from there in my vessel, and saw them plainly, flags flying,17 with my own eyes."
At this news, Lord Howard, and others of the party, began to hurry towards the harbour, eager to put to sea 18 at once, but Drake called on them 19 to stop. "No, no! " he said, "there is plenty of time to finish the pine and to beat the Spaniards too."
It was at four o'clock on the afternoon of July 19th, 1588, that the news of the coming of the Spanish Armada 20 reached the captains on the Hoe. On the following day, the English fleet was ready to sail, but Howard allowed the Armada to pass Plymouth before he gave the order for the attack.21 This did not take place until the following day.
Drake's clever seamanship and fearless 22 courage 23 covered him with fresh glory.24 Wherever he appeared, he struck terror into 25 the hearts of the invaders.2 The English soldiers and sailors fought like lions, while the luckless 26 Spaniards seemed to feel the shadow 27 of the coming defeat.28
When at length the English sent fire-ships 29 among the enemy's fleet, the Spaniards were struck with terror, as one mighty vessel after another became a mass 30 of roaring flame." Drake was quick to seize the chance ; 32 he boarded 33 and carried off twelve of the great ships. This was the last, as it was the most heroic,34 deed which attended the great victory 35 of the English over the Spanish Armada.
Of the one hundred and thirty-two ships which had sailed from Spain, only about fifty returned, and these were more or less in bad condition. When the King of Spain heard the bad news, he was not willing to give England the credit 36 of having beaten his great fleet. " I did not send them to fight against wind and waves," he said.
Queen Elizabeth went to St Paul's Cathedra1,37 to offer up thanks 38 for the great victory. She also caused 39 a medal 40 to be struck, bearing these words

---
1 Or: they had been told. A newspaper contains the news, tells us what new things have happened. 2 The enemy sends a fleet or an army to invade a country. The Spaniards wanted to invade England; they were invaders. 3 He wanted to make England suffer. A boy who is careless in his work is punished by the teacher. 4 To take away her strength in ships, to make England weak at sea. We destroy a piece of paper by burning it. England is powerful at sea; Spain did not succeed in rendering her powerless. 5 Or: got ready. Fit, fitted ; cp, cut, cutting ; hit, hitting; hot, hotter; let, letting; pat, patted; put, putting ; set, setting ; wet, wetted. 6 to give trouble to. 7 To get in their way, to delay them. Our voyage was hindered by a fog. s v. to visit. Are you expecting any visitors this afternoon? Visit, visitor; cp. sail, sailor. y without being harmed; none of his ships were disabled by the Spaniards. Cp. unknown. 10 Or: took. 11 If hair is brought near a fire, it is singed. 12 A game played with wooden balls, on grass. 13 Or : when they were in the middle of the game. 14 v. to play. 15 Or: out of breath, because he had been running so fast. We breathe through the nose, and sometimes through the mouth. 16 Or: the coast of Cornwall, a county in the south of England. i7 He had seen the Spanish flags. 18 Or : to set sail. 19 Or: asked them. 20 So the Spanish fleet was called. 21 v, to attack. 22 Cp. careless, powerless, restless, worthless. 23 Or : bravery. Nothing daunted his sturdy spirit. 24 Or: fame. He had gained great fame before ; now he gained still more. 25 Or: terrified. 26 Or: unfortunate ; opp. lucky. They had bad luck. 27 The shadow (cp. shade) is sometimes seen before the thing itself. 28 opp. victory. They felt that they were going to be defeated. 29 There were no sailors on these ships, but they were filled with things that burnt fiercely. 30 A mass is something very large. A mass of rock. 31 The flame of a lamp gives us light. When we strike a match, there is a flame. When a fire is fierce, we can hear the flames, they roar. 32 He did not miss the chance, but seized it quickly. 33 He boarded the ship : he brought his own ship close to it, so that his sailors could get on board. 34 Drake was a hero, a very brave man, and he did many heroic deeds. 36 Which was done at the time of this victory.
Or: honour. s7 A great church in London. 38 Thanks (to God) ; v. to thank. 39 s. cause (IX. 27) ; she had it made.. 40 A piece of metal, generally round, with words in memory of a great man, a great victory, etc. 41 Driven in all directions. In autumn the wind scatters the dry leaves.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE About five years after Drake had made his great voyage round what is world, he again crossed what is Atlantic Ocean, and attacked what is Spaniards in what is West Indies. From this voyage he brought home a large number of cannons and much wealth, that he had taken from what is Spaniards. When he reached England, he found what is people very much excited, for news had come 1 that what is King of Spain was getting ready a great fleet with which to invade 2 this country. His object was to punish .3 England for helping his enemies, and at what is same time to destroy her power at sea for ever." what is merchants of London had fitted out 6 a small fleet of six vessels, to which Elizabeth had added four ships. Drake was placed in command of this little fleet, and at what is head of what is ten sturdy vessels he set out to harass 6 what is Spaniards and hinder 7 them as much as possible. what is Spaniards did not expect such a what is or,8 wh where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Poetry Northwest (1959) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 19 where is strong XIX. what is Sea King of Devon (4) where is p align="justify" About five years after Drake had made his great voyage round what is world, he again crossed what is Atlantic Ocean, and attacked what is Spaniards in what is West Indies. From this voyage he brought home a large number of cannons and much wealth, that he had taken from what is Spaniards. When he reached England, he found what is people very much excited, for news had come 1 that what is King of Spain was getting ready a great fleet with which to invade 2 this country. His object was to punish .3 England for helping his enemies, and at what is same time to destroy her power at sea for ever." what is merchants of London had fitted out 6 a small fleet of six vessels, to which Elizabeth had added four ships. Drake was placed in command of this little fleet, and at what is head of what is ten sturdy vessels he set out to harass 6 what is Spaniards and hinder 7 them as much as possible. what is Spaniards did not expect such a what is or,8 when Drake appeared in their most important harbour, and bravely led his fleet straight in among what is Spanish ships. Right and left he fiercely attacked what is surprised vessels, and after burning or sinking thirty-three of their number, he made his way out again unharmed.9 On his way home, he captured 10 a large treasure ship, what is richest be had ever taken, and this partly paid for what is money spent in fitting out what is fleet with which he had done so much harm. On his return, Drake was welcomed with fresh honours, and everywhere he proudly boasted that he had " singed 11the Spanish King's beard." One day in what is following year, a number of naval officers were busy playing a game of bowls 12 on Plymouth Hoe, near what is spot where Drake's statue now stands. Among those present were Lord Howard, who was at this time Lord High Admiral of England, Sir Francis Drake, Sir Walter Raleigh, and many other famous sailors. Just when what is game was at its height,13 a man came running towards what is players.14 When he reached what is spot, he was so breathless,15 that at first he could scarcely speak. Seeing that he hwl brought important news, what is players stopped, and stood round him, waiting for what he had to tell them. " what is Spanish fleet," he cried, "is even now off what is Cornish coast.16 I have just come from there in my vessel, and saw them plainly, flags flying,17 with my own eyes." At this news, Lord Howard, and others of what is party, began to hurry towards what is harbour, eager to put to sea 18 at once, but Drake called on them 19 to stop. "No, no! " he said, "there is plenty of time to finish what is pine and to beat what is Spaniards too." It was at four o'clock on what is afternoon of July 19th, 1588, that what is news of what is coming of what is Spanish Armada 20 reached what is captains on what is Hoe. On what is following day, what is English fleet was ready to sail, but Howard allowed what is Armada to pass Plymouth before he gave what is order for what is attack.21 This did not take place until what is following day. Drake's clever seamanship and fearless 22 courage 23 covered him with fresh glory.24 Wherever he appeared, he struck terror into 25 what is hearts of what is invaders.2 what is English soldiers and sailors fought like lions, while what is luckless 26 Spaniards seemed to feel what is shadow 27 of what is coming defeat.28 When at length what is English sent fire-ships 29 among what is enemy's fleet, what is Spaniards were struck with terror, as one mighty vessel after another became a mass 30 of roaring flame." Drake was quick to seize what is chance ; 32 he boarded 33 and carried off twelve of what is great ships. This was what is last, as it was what is most heroic,34 deed which attended what is great victory 35 of what is English over the Spanish Armada. Of what is one hundred and thirty-two ships which had sailed from Spain, only about fifty returned, and these were more or less in bad condition. When what is King of Spain heard what is bad news, he was not willing to give England what is credit 36 of having beaten his great fleet. " I did not send them to fight against wind and waves," he said. Queen Elizabeth went to St Paul's Cathedra1,37 to offer up thanks 38 for what is great victory. She also caused 39 a medal 40 to be struck, bearing these words --- 1 Or: they had been told. A newspaper contains what is news, tells us what new things have happened. 2 what is enemy sends a fleet or an army to invade a country. The Spaniards wanted to invade England; they were invaders. 3 He wanted to make England suffer. A boy who is careless in his work is punished by what is teacher. 4 To take away her strength in ships, to make England weak at sea. We destroy a piece of paper by burning it. England is powerful at sea; Spain did not succeed in rendering her powerless. 5 Or: got ready. Fit, fitted ; cp, cut, cutting ; hit, hitting; hot, hotter; let, letting; pat, patted; put, putting ; set, setting ; wet, wetted. 6 to give trouble to. 7 To get in their way, to delay them. Our voyage was hindered by a fog. s v. to what is . Are you expecting any what is ors this afternoon? what is , what is or; cp. sail, sailor. y without being harmed; none of his ships were disabled by what is Spaniards. Cp. unknown. 10 Or: took. 11 If hair is brought near a fire, it is singed. 12 A game played with wooden balls, on grass. 13 Or : when they were in what is middle of what is game. 14 v. to play. 15 Or: out of breath, because he had been running so fast. We breathe through what is nose, and sometimes through what is mouth. 16 Or: what is coast of Cornwall, a county in what is south of England. i7 He had seen what is Spanish flags. 18 Or : to set sail. 19 Or: asked them. 20 So what is Spanish fleet was called. 21 v, to attack. 22 Cp. careless, powerless, restless, worthless. 23 Or : bravery. Nothing daunted his sturdy spirit. 24 Or: fame. He had gained great fame before ; now he gained still more. 25 Or: terrified. 26 Or: unfortunate ; opp. lucky. They had bad luck. 27 what is shadow (cp. shade) is sometimes seen before what is thing itself. 28 opp. victory. They felt that they were going to be defeated. 29 There were no sailors on these ships, but they were filled with things that burnt fiercely. 30 A mass is something very large. A mass of rock. 31 what is flame of a lamp gives us light. When we strike a match, there is a flame. When a fire is fierce, we can hear what is flames, they roar. 32 He did not miss what is chance, but seized it quickly. 33 He boarded what is ship : he brought his own ship close to it, so that his sailors could get on board. 34 Drake was a hero, a very brave man, and he did many heroic deeds. 36 Which was done at what is time of this victory. Or: honour. s7 A great church in London. 38 Thanks (to God) ; v. to thank. 39 s. cause (IX. 27) ; she had it made.. 40 A piece of metal, generally round, with words in memory of a great man, a great victory, etc. 41 Driven in all directions. In autumn what is wind scatters what is dry leaves. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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