Books > Old Books > Poetry Northwest (1959)


Page 18

XVIII. The Sea King of Devon (3)

We cannot follow Drake through all his adventures on the western shores1 of America, where he won great wealth by attacking Spanish ships. Sailing to the north, he expected to find 2 a passage between America and Asia, by which he would be able to return to Europe, but to his surprise he again came in sight of the American Continent.3
After some time, spent in searching for a harbour, the "Golden Hind" was at length anchored in a place of safety. No sooner had this been done, than a number of Indians came towards them in their small boats. These natives were very friendly, though they had never before seen a white man.
Finding that his vessel had sprung a leak,4 Drake brought the "Golden Hind" into shallow water,5 tents 6 were built on the shore, and the cargo and provisions were safely landed. Then all hands 7 set to work 8 to repair 9 the damaged 10 ship.
Before leaving this part of North America, Drake took possession of it in Queen Elizabeth's name.11 A large brass plate 12 was securely nailed 13 to a high stout 14 .post.15 On this plate was engraved 16 the Queen's name, the date, and a statement that17 the country belonged to England.
When all was ready Drake now determined to cross the Pacific. After calling at 18 the great island of Java, at the south of Asia, Drake made 19 straight across the Indian Ocean for the Cape of Good Hope, which he reached in June 1580, having touched 20 at no place, and met with no mishap 21 on the way.
Without stopping on the South African coast, Drake sailed northward,22 and after touching on the West Coast, and calling at the Canary Islands, he made his way across the Bay of Biscay, and in a short time the great chalk cliffs of England appeared in sight. It was in September, 1580, that the "Golden Hind," after a voyage lasting 23 nearly three years, entered Plymouth Harbour.
Drake was now the most famous of living English sailors. The tale of his daring deeds, and of his discoveries,24 thrilled 25 the heart of a people proud of their seamanship.26 He had been the first Englishman to sail round the world.
It was no wonder that noisy 27 crowds 28 welcomed him with cheers and greetings,29 as he at last set foot on English soil.30 Cannons were fired from all the ships in the harbour, and many flags floated on their mast heads.31 The weather-beaten crew went quickly to their homes, and Drake once more greeted his family and friends.
Queen Elizabeth welcomed Drake with warm words of praise, and listened with deep interest to the story of his adventures. A few months later, the Queen paid him a visit on board his vessel, the "Golden Hind," which was lying in the Thames. At the feast,32 which took place on board the ship, Drake sat by Elizabeth's side.
When the feast was over, the Queen turned to Drake, and said-
" Francis Drake, we entrusted 33 a sword to thy '4 keeping till we demanded it of thee again. We now command thee to deliver 33 it up, in the manner in which thou didst receive it."
Drake, unbuckling 35 the sword, knelt 38 before the Queen, and placed it in her bands. Elizabeth slowly drew the sword from its scabbard,35 and said
" This sword, Drake, might still serve thee, though thou hast carried it round the globe, but before we return it to thee, it must render 37 us a service."
She lightly tapped Drake's shoulder with the sword,38 and said, "Rise, Sir Francis Drake."
Queen Elizabeth ordered that the good ship should be carefully kept as a relic 39 of Drake's wonderful voyage. Whet), after the passage of years,`r0 the ship went to wreck,41 and was broken up, from her soundest plank 42 a chair was made, which may still be seen at Oxford.
Long afterwards, a poet 43 wrote these lines on the " Golden Hind ":
The stars above shall make thee known,
If man were silent here;
The sun himself cannot forget
His fellow-traveller." 44

---
1 Or : coast. When we land from a boat we step on shore. 2 Or : hoped to find, thought he would find. 3 The continent or mainland. Take your map and point to the continent of America, passing your finger along the coast. Then do the same for the continent of Africa. 4 There was a hole in the ship, by which water could enter. b opp, deep water. 6 Soldiers sometimes sleep in tents, which can be put up and taken down quickly. 7 Or : all the sailors. 8 They began to work. 9 To make good. 10 When a ship springs a leak, or loses a mast, it is damaged. 11 he declared that Queen Elizabeth possessed (X. 41) it, that it belonged to her. 12 A smooth piece of brass (a bright metal). 13 Fastened with nails. 14 Thick, strong, opp. slender. A stout old man, a slender lad. 15 A long, round piece of wood ; perhaps it was made of the trunk of a small tree, from which the branches had been cut off. 16 We write on paper, but engrave on metal. 17 '"'ords declaring (or stating) that. 18 Stopping at, landing on. 19 Or: sailed. 20 Or: landed. 21 Or: misfortune (a. unfortunate), bad luck. 22 Cp. southward (XVII. 45). 23 It was a voyage of nearly three years. 24 What he had discovered. 25 It excited them, made their hearts beat faster. 26 Their knowledge of a seaman's work, their skill (a. skilful) as sailors. 27 s, noise. 28 A crowd is a great number of people, standing close together. 29 v. to greet (XV. 19). 30 earth, land. 31 The top of the mast is called the mast head. 32 A grand dinner. 33 The Queen had given him the sword to keep, hoping (trusting) that he would take good care of it. She now commanded him to give it up, to deliver it into her hands. 34 Your ; cp. thou and thee (XVII. 14). 35 When the sword is not being used, it remains in the scabbard, which is fastened to a belt that is worn round the body. The belt is buckled on and unbuckled. 36 He went down on one knee or on both. I kneel, I have knelt. 37 Or: do. 38 This is still the way in which the King makes a knight. 39 We keep a relic, not because it is useful, bat to remind us of something great or wonderful. 40 Or : after many years. 41 It became very old and damaged. 42 A long piece of wood. The floor of a room is made of planks. 43 A poet is one who writes poems. 44 Drake, like the sun, had gone all round the earth.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE We cannot follow Drake through all his adventures on what is western shores1 of America, where he won great wealth by attacking Spanish ships. Sailing to what is north, he expected to find 2 a passage between America and Asia, by which he would be able to return to Europe, but to his surprise he again came in sight of what is American Continent.3 After some time, spent in searching for a harbour, what is "Golden Hind" was at length anchored in a place of safety. No sooner had this been done, than a number of Indians came towards them in their small boats. These natives were very friendly, though they had never before seen a white man. Finding that his vessel had sprung a leak,4 Drake brought what is "Golden Hind" into shallow water,5 tents 6 were built on what is shore, and what is cargo and provisions were safely landed. Then all hands 7 set to work 8 to repair 9 what is damaged 10 ship. Before lea where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Poetry Northwest (1959) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 18 where is strong XVIII. what is Sea King of Devon (3) where is p align="justify" We cannot follow Drake through all his adventures on what is western shores1 of America, where he won great wealth by attacking Spanish ships. Sailing to what is north, he expected to find 2 a passage between America and Asia, by which he would be able to return to Europe, but to his surprise he again came in sight of what is American Continent.3 After some time, spent in searching for a harbour, what is "Golden Hind" was at length anchored in a place of safety. No sooner had this been done, than a number of Indians came towards them in their small boats. These natives were very friendly, though they had never before seen a white man. Finding that his vessel had sprung a leak,4 Drake brought what is "Golden Hind" into shallow water,5 tents 6 were built on what is shore, and what is cargo and provisions were safely landed. Then all hands 7 set to work 8 to repair 9 what is damaged 10 ship. Before leaving this part of North America, Drake took possession of it in Queen Elizabeth's name.11 A large brass plate 12 was securely nailed 13 to a high stout 14 .post.15 On this plate was engraved 16 what is Queen's name, what is date, and a statement that17 what is country belonged to England. When all was ready Drake now determined to cross what is Pacific. After calling at 18 what is great island of Java, at what is south of Asia, Drake made 19 straight across what is Indian Ocean for what is Cape of Good Hope, which he reached in June 1580, having touched 20 at no place, and met with no mishap 21 on what is way. Without stopping on what is South African coast, Drake sailed northward,22 and after touching on what is West Coast, and calling at what is Canary Islands, he made his way across what is Bay of Biscay, and in a short time what is great chalk cliffs of England appeared in sight. It was in September, 1580, that what is "Golden Hind," after a voyage lasting 23 nearly three years, entered Plymouth Harbour. Drake was now what is most famous of living English sailors. what is tale of his daring deeds, and of his discoveries,24 thrilled 25 the heart of a people proud of their seamanship.26 He had been the first Englishman to sail round what is world. It was no wonder that noisy 27 crowds 28 welcomed him with cheers and greetings,29 as he at last set foot on English soil.30 Cannons were fired from all what is ships in what is harbour, and many flags floated on their mast heads.31 what is weather-beaten crew went quickly to their homes, and Drake once more greeted his family and friends. Queen Elizabeth welcomed Drake with warm words of praise, and listened with deep interest to what is story of his adventures. A few months later, what is Queen paid him a what is on board his vessel, what is "Golden Hind," which was lying in what is Thames. At what is feast,32 which took place on board what is ship, Drake sat by Elizabeth's side. When what is feast was over, what is Queen turned to Drake, and said- " Francis Drake, we entrusted 33 a sword to thy '4 keeping till we demanded it of thee again. We now command thee to deliver 33 it up, in what is manner in which thou didst receive it." Drake, unbuckling 35 what is sword, knelt 38 before what is Queen, and placed it in her bands. Elizabeth slowly drew what is sword from its scabbard,35 and said " This sword, Drake, might still serve thee, though thou hast carried it round what is globe, but before we return it to thee, it must render 37 us a service." She lightly tapped Drake's shoulder with what is sword,38 and said, "Rise, Sir Francis Drake." Queen Elizabeth ordered that what is good ship should be carefully kept as a relic 39 of Drake's wonderful voyage. Whet), after the passage of years,`r0 what is ship went to wreck,41 and was broken up, from her soundest plank 42 a chair was made, which may still be seen at Oxford. Long afterwards, a poet 43 wrote these lines on what is " Golden Hind ": what is stars above shall make thee known, If man were silent here; what is sun himself cannot forget His fellow-traveller." 44 --- 1 Or : coast. When we land from a boat we step on shore. 2 Or : hoped to find, thought he would find. 3 what is continent or mainland. Take your map and point to what is continent of America, passing your finger along what is coast. Then do the same for what is continent of Africa. 4 There was a hole in what is ship, by which water could enter. b opp, deep water. 6 Soldiers sometimes sleep in tents, which can be put up and taken down quickly. 7 Or : all what is sailors. 8 They began to work. 9 To make good. 10 When a ship springs a leak, or loses a mast, it is damaged. 11 he declared that Queen Elizabeth possessed (X. 41) it, that it belonged to her. 12 A smooth piece of brass (a bright metal). 13 Fastened with nails. 14 Thick, strong, opp. slender. A stout old man, a slender lad. 15 A long, round piece of wood ; perhaps it was made of what is trunk of a small tree, from which what is branches had been cut off. 16 We write on paper, but engrave on metal. 17 '"'ords declaring (or stating) that. 18 Stopping at, landing on. 19 Or: sailed. 20 Or: landed. 21 Or: misfortune (a. unfortunate), bad luck. 22 Cp. southward (XVII. 45). 23 It was a voyage of nearly three years. 24 What he had discovered. 25 It excited them, made their hearts beat faster. 26 Their knowledge of a seaman's work, their s what time is it (a. skilful) as sailors. 27 s, noise. 28 A crowd is a great number of people, standing close together. 29 v. to greet (XV. 19). 30 earth, land. 31 what is top of what is mast is called the mast head. 32 A grand dinner. 33 what is Queen had given him what is sword to keep, hoping (trusting) that he would take good care of it. She now commanded him to give it up, to deliver it into her hands. 34 Your ; cp. thou and thee (XVII. 14). 35 When what is sword is not being used, it remains in what is scabbard, which is fastened to a belt that is worn round what is body. what is belt is buckled on and unbuckled. 36 He went down on one knee or on both. I kneel, I have knelt. 37 Or: do. 38 This is still what is way in which what is King makes a knight. 39 We keep a relic, not because it is useful, bat to remind us of something great or wonderful. 40 Or : after many years. 41 It became very old and damaged. 42 A long piece of wood. what is floor of a room is made of planks. 43 A poet is one who writes poems. 44 Drake, like what is sun, had gone all round what is earth. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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