Books > Old Books > Poetry Northwest (1959)


Page 16

XVII. The Sea King of Devon (2)

Queen Elizabeth had been nearly twenty years on the throne of England, when Drake set out on his famous voyage to sail an English ship on the Pacific Ocean. The Queen had been told that he intended 1 to explore the great ocean, and before he set out she gave him a sword.- As she did so, she said
" Receive this sword, Francis Drake, and wear it till we require 3 it of thee 4 And we do count, Drake, that he that striketh at thee striketh at us 4."
Only a few friends were told the purpose of the voyage.5 Drake was afraid that, if it became known, some other sailor might try to win the honour that he intended for himself. Then, again, it was very important that Spain should not have any idea of his purpose,6 for at that time the Spaniards regarded' the seas round about South America as their own.
In a short time, five fine vessels were anchored 8 in the quiet waters of Plymouth Sound. These vessels contained provisions 9 for a long and doubtful io voyage, with a good supply 11 of cannons. The company consisted of 12 one hundred and sixtyfour gentlemen and sailors, a band of musicians,13 and a number of skilful cooks. It seemed as though they were setting out on a voyage of pleasure, rather than one of danger.
Drake's object 14 was to cross the Atlantic, and with as little delay as possible 15 pass through the Strait of Magellan.16 21 This was all the more daring,17 as the Spaniards had given up sailing their ships through the strait, on account of 18 its many dangers. It was even said that the passage 19 was closed up and that no vessels could pass through.
Sailors were in the habit of declaring that no discoverer 20 could sail on the Pacific Ocean and live. Magellan 21 himself had been killed by savages 21 on its islands, and Balboa,22 the first European to set eyes on the Pacific, had met with a violent 22 death.
Drake knew all this, but the knowledge 23 did not in the least daunt 24 his sturdy spirit.Y5 He knew that the shortest way to reach the Pacific by water was to pass through the Strait of Magellan, and therefore he made up his mind to go that way, or to perish zB in the attempt.27
The little fleet set sail from Plymouth in November, and it was not until early in April that Drake sighted South America For some distance along the coast, Drake could not find a secure 28 haven 29 for his ships, and several times they were separated, until at length 39 they all met at the mouth of the River Plate, where they came to an anchor.
Once more the commander proceeded 31 south. It was late in August when he gave the signal 32 to enter the famous strait. It seemed dangerous enough, as the sailors looked ahead.33 The winding 34 passage seemed too narrow for their ships, and the wind blew so hard 35 that they feared they would be dashed on the rocks on either hand.36
Each morning there was a heavy frost. Snow fell, and it was bitterly cold. Often, too, the ships could find no place in which to anchor, so deep were the channels 37 through which they passed. Wild storms burst suddenly on them, and drove them to left and right, and sometimes forced them to fall back before the violence of the gale.38
Before this, vessels had taken at least a month to make their way through the winding channels of the strait, but in less than half that time Drake had passed from the Atlantic to the Pacific, and early in September the brave explorers 39 were rewarded by seeing, rising up out of the restless 40 waters, the cape, which, as they knew, stood at the outlet 41 from the strait into the long-looked-for Pacific.
The voyage along the western coast of South America was at first calm 42 and rapid.43 Then a violent storm overtook 44 the little fleet, and it was driven southward 45 again. A second storm was even more violent. The ships were dashed from side to side, and lost sight of each other. Masts 46 were torn from the decks, and the sails were torn to pieces.
At length Drake found himself, in the "Golden Hind," 47 back at the entrance to the Strait of Magellan. Even he now began to think that there was some truth in the general belief 4s that it was impossible safely to cross the Pacific.
As none of the missing vessels returned, Drake had to believe that they had either been wrecked 49 or had deserted 50 him. So, alone, the " Golden Hind " proceeded on her voyage.
Drake at last reached the islands in the extreme south 51 of South America. Here he anchored in a deep basin,52 sheltered by high cliffs.53 Landing 54 on one of the islands, Drake and his crew rested for a time.
As soon as he had recovered from the voyage, Drake started to explore the island. He therefore made his way alone to the southernmost 55 cliff, where he threw himself at full length on its highest point, and stretched his arms and body out over the waters as far as he safely could.
When he returned to the "Golden Hind" one of his officers asked him
" Captain, where have you been ?"
Drake replied with a proud smile, " I have been farther 56 south than any man living. I have stood on the southernmost point of land in the world !"
He had indeed stood on the very end of Cape Horn, the most southerly 55 point of South America. Before him stretched the Antarctic Ocean,57 the waters of which flow round the South Pole.

---
1 he had determined to do it, it was his wish to do it. z Officers in the army have a sword, with which they can cut the enemy. 3 here : ask it back. I require a pen : I need it. 4We (I, the Queen) shall feel that if any one strikes you it is as though he struck us. People used to say °`striketh" for "strikes" and "thou" (nom.), thee (ace.) for "you." "Count" here: think, feel, be of opinion. 5`Vhat was to be done on this voyage, where they were going, what they wanted to do. g It would have done harm if the Spaniards had known that Drake wanted to sail on the Pacific Ocean ; they must not know about it. Cp. self-important, XIV. 11. 7 Or : looked upon. 8 Or: were at anchor (see XVI. 53). 9 Or: food. 10 v. doubt; it was uncertain, how long they would be at sea, whether they would reach the Pacific Ocean. li A large number; they were well supplied with cannons, they had many on board. 1z Or: There were altogether. 13 People who know how to play musical instruments. A number of musicians who play together is called a band. 14 Or : purpose, what he wanted to do. It is your object to learn English. 15 Or: as quickly as possible. If the Spaniards knew of his purpose, they would delay him by attacking his ships. Stormy weather often delays ships. 16 Look for this on your map ; then you will know what a strait is. 17 He was a brave man, and so he dared to do this dangerous thing. ls Or: because of. The Spaniards no longer went that way, because they were afraid of the dangers. 19 Or : the strait, through which Drake wanted to pass. 20 v. to discover (see XV. 16). Drake wanted to explore the Pacific Ocean, to discover new ways for ships, new countries. 21 Magellan was born in Portugal about 1470. He passed through the strait called after him in 1520, and entered the ocean which he called " Pacific," because the weather was fine and the sea smooth. In the following year he was killed by the savage natives of an island in the Pacific. 22 The Spaniard Balboa was born in 1475. He first looked upon the Pacific in 1513 and was beheaded (his head was cut off) in 1517. This was a violent (opp. natural; s. nature) death. 23 v, to know. 24 Or : frighten, make him turn back. 25 Or : heart. 28 Or: to die. 27 v. to attempt, to try ; in the attempt, in trying to reach the Pacific. 28 Or: safe. 29 Or : harbour, port. 80 Or: at last. 31 went on, sailed on, 32 Or : signalled (see XV. 28). 33 Or : in front of them. 34 Not straight, turning now to the left, now to the right. 35 It was so strong. 36 On the left and on the right, on both sides. 37 The passages between the rocks ; cp. the English Channel (XVI. 4). 38 Or : made them sail back because the gale was so violent ; cp. silent, silence ; distant, distance; fragrant, fragrance. as v. to egplore ; op. adventurer, beginner, bystander, commander, farmer, helper, hunter, miller, owner, passer-by, shoemaker, teacher, wagoner. 40 never resting ; s. rest. Cp. careless, worthless. 41 A cape is a point of land. Look for Cape Horn on your map of South America. Outlet : the way out, opp. entrance. 42 opp. stormy. 43 opp. Slow. 44 Came from be hind and caught them. A man starts on a journey before another, but the latter travels more quickly and so overtakes him. 45 Cp. homeward (VIII. 20). 46 The sails hang from the masts. Small sailing-vessels have one mast, larger ones have two or three. 47 This was the name of his ship. 48 v. to believe. It was the general belief : all people thought so. 49 When a ship is disabled, it is a wreck. Drake thought some of the ships had been lost. 50 Or: left him, because the crews did not want to stay with him. 510r: the very south, the last point of South America. 52 We wash our hands with water in a basin. Here the basin is a small haven. 53 There were high cliffs that kept off strong winds, so that the water there was calm. When it rains very much, we stand under a tree ; the tree shelters us from the rain, it is our shelter. 54 Leaving the ship, and going on to the land. 55 The cliff that was more to the south than any other, the most southerly cliff. 56 Comparative of far. 57 opp. the Arctic Ocean, in the north.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Queen Elizabeth had been nearly twenty years on what is throne of England, when Drake set out on his famous voyage to sail an English ship on what is Pacific Ocean. what is Queen had been told that he intended 1 to explore what is great ocean, and before he set out she gave him a sword.- As she did so, she said " Receive this sword, Francis Drake, and wear it till we require 3 it of thee 4 And we do count, Drake, that he that striketh at thee striketh at us 4." Only a few friends were told what is purpose of what is voyage.5 Drake was afraid that, if it became known, some other sailor might try to win what is honour that he intended for himself. Then, again, it was very important that Spain should not have any idea of his purpose,6 for at that time what is Spaniards regarded' what is seas round about South America as their own. In a short time, five fine vessels were anchored 8 in what is quiet waters of Plymouth Sou where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Poetry Northwest (1959) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 16 where is strong XVII. what is Sea King of Devon (2) where is p align="justify" Queen Elizabeth had been nearly twenty years on what is throne of England, when Drake set out on his famous voyage to sail an English ship on what is Pacific Ocean. what is Queen had been told that he intended 1 to explore what is great ocean, and before he set out she gave him a sword.- As she did so, she said " Receive this sword, Francis Drake, and wear it till we require 3 it of thee 4 And we do count, Drake, that he that striketh at thee striketh at us 4." Only a few friends were told what is purpose of what is voyage.5 Drake was afraid that, if it became known, some other sailor might try to win what is honour that he intended for himself. Then, again, it was very important that Spain should not have any idea of his purpose,6 for at that time what is Spaniards regarded' what is seas round about South America as their own. In a short time, five fine vessels were anchored 8 in what is quiet waters of Plymouth Sound. These vessels contained provisions 9 for a long and doubtful io voyage, with a good supply 11 of cannons. what is company consisted of 12 one hundred and sixtyfour gentlemen and sailors, a band of musicians,13 and a number of skilful cooks. It seemed as though they were setting out on a voyage of pleasure, rather than one of danger. Drake's object 14 was to cross what is Atlantic, and with as little delay as possible 15 pass through what is Strait of Magellan.16 21 This was all what is more daring,17 as what is Spaniards had given up sailing their ships through what is strait, on account of 18 its many dangers. It was even said that what is passage 19 was closed up and that no vessels could pass through. Sailors were in what is habit of declaring that no discoverer 20 could sail on what is Pacific Ocean and live. Magellan 21 himself had been stop ed by savages 21 on its islands, and Balboa,22 what is first European to set eyes on what is Pacific, had met with a bad 22 what time is it . Drake knew all this, but what is knowledge 23 did not in what is least daunt 24 his sturdy spirit.Y5 He knew that what is shortest way to reach what is Pacific by water was to pass through what is Strait of Magellan, and therefore he made up his mind to go that way, or to perish zB in what is attempt.27 what is little fleet set sail from Plymouth in November, and it was not until early in April that Drake sighted South America For some distance along what is coast, Drake could not find a secure 28 haven 29 for his ships, and several times they were separated, until at length 39 they all met at what is mouth of what is River Plate, where they came to an anchor. Once more what is commander proceeded 31 south. It was late in August when he gave what is signal 32 to enter what is famous strait. It seemed dangerous enough, as what is sailors looked ahead.33 what is winding 34 passage seemed too narrow for their ships, and what is wind blew so hard 35 that they feared they would be dashed on what is rocks on either hand.36 Each morning there was a heavy frost. Snow fell, and it was bitterly cold. Often, too, what is ships could find no place in which to anchor, so deep were what is channels 37 through which they passed. Wild storms burst suddenly on them, and drove them to left and right, and sometimes forced them to fall back before what is sports of what is gale.38 Before this, vessels had taken at least a month to make their way through what is winding channels of what is strait, but in less than half that time Drake had passed from what is Atlantic to what is Pacific, and early in September what is brave explorers 39 were rewarded by seeing, rising up out of what is restless 40 waters, what is cape, which, as they knew, stood at what is outlet 41 from what is strait into what is long-looked-for Pacific. what is voyage along what is western coast of South America was at first calm 42 and rapid.43 Then a bad storm overtook 44 the little fleet, and it was driven southward 45 again. A second storm was even more bad . what is ships were dashed from side to side, and lost sight of each other. Masts 46 were torn from what is decks, and what is sails were torn to pieces. At length Drake found himself, in what is "Golden Hind," 47 back at what is entrance to what is Strait of Magellan. Even he now began to think that there was some truth in what is general belief 4s that it was impossible safely to cross what is Pacific. As none of what is missing vessels returned, Drake had to believe that they had either been wrecked 49 or had deserted 50 him. So, alone, what is " Golden Hind " proceeded on her voyage. Drake at last reached what is islands in what is extreme south 51 of South America. Here he anchored in a deep basin,52 sheltered by high cliffs.53 Landing 54 on one of what is islands, Drake and his crew rested for a time. As soon as he had recovered from what is voyage, Drake started to explore what is island. He therefore made his way alone to what is southernmost 55 cliff, where he threw himself at full length on its highest point, and stretched his arms and body out over what is waters as far as he safely could. When he returned to what is "Golden Hind" one of his officers asked him " Captain, where have you been ?" Drake replied with a proud smile, " I have been farther 56 south than any man living. I have stood on what is southernmost point of land in what is world !" He had indeed stood on what is very end of Cape Horn, what is most southerly 55 point of South America. Before him stretched what is Antarctic Ocean,57 what is waters of which flow round what is South Pole. --- 1 he had determined to do it, it was his wish to do it. z Officers in what is army have a sword, with which they can cut what is enemy. 3 here : ask it back. I require a pen : I need it. 4We (I, what is Queen) shall feel that if any one strikes you it is as though he struck us. People used to say °`striketh" for "strikes" and "thou" (nom.), thee (ace.) for "you." "Count" here: think, feel, be of opinion. 5`Vhat was to be done on this voyage, where they were going, what they wanted to do. g It would have done harm if what is Spaniards had known that Drake wanted to sail on what is Pacific Ocean ; they must not know about it. Cp. self-important, XIV. 11. 7 Or : looked upon. 8 Or: were at anchor (see XVI. 53). 9 Or: food. 10 v. doubt; it was uncertain, how long they would be at sea, whether they would reach what is Pacific Ocean. li A large number; they were well supplied with cannons, they had many on board. 1z Or: There were altogether. 13 People who know how to play musical instruments. A number of musicians who play together is called a band. 14 Or : purpose, what he wanted to do. It is your object to learn English. 15 Or: as quickly as possible. If what is Spaniards knew of his purpose, they would delay him by attacking his ships. Stormy weather often delays ships. 16 Look for this on your map ; then you will know what a strait is. 17 He was a brave man, and so he dared to do this dangerous thing. ls Or: because of. what is Spaniards no longer went that way, because they were afraid of what is dangers. 19 Or : what is strait, through which Drake wanted to pass. 20 v. to discover (see XV. 16). Drake wanted to explore what is Pacific Ocean, to discover new ways for ships, new countries. 21 Magellan was born in Portugal about 1470. He passed through what is strait called after him in 1520, and entered what is ocean which he called " Pacific," because what is weather was fine and what is sea smooth. In what is following year he was stop ed by what is savage natives of an island in what is Pacific. 22 what is Spaniard Balboa was born in 1475. He first looked upon what is Pacific in 1513 and was beheaded (his head was cut off) in 1517. This was a bad (opp. natural; s. nature) what time is it . 23 v, to know. 24 Or : frighten, make him turn back. 25 Or : heart. 28 Or: to die. 27 v. to attempt, to try ; in what is attempt, in trying to reach what is Pacific. 28 Or: safe. 29 Or : harbour, port. 80 Or: at last. 31 went on, sailed on, 32 Or : signalled (see XV. 28). 33 Or : in front of them. 34 Not straight, turning now to what is left, now to what is right. 35 It was so strong. 36 On what is left and on what is right, on both sides. 37 what is passages between what is rocks ; cp. what is English Channel (XVI. 4). 38 Or : made them sail back because what is gale was so bad ; cp. silent, silence ; distant, distance; fragrant, fragrance. as v. to egplore ; op. adventurer, beginner, bystander, commander, farmer, helper, hunter, miller, owner, passer-by, shoemaker, teacher, wagoner. 40 never resting ; s. rest. Cp. careless, worthless. 41 A cape is a point of land. Look for Cape Horn on your map of South America. Outlet : what is way out, opp. entrance. 42 opp. stormy. 43 opp. Slow. 44 Came from be hind and caught them. A man starts on a journey before another, but what is latter travels more quickly and so overtakes him. 45 Cp. homeward (VIII. 20). 46 The sails hang from what is masts. Small sailing-vessels have one mast, larger ones have two or three. 47 This was what is name of his ship. 48 v. to believe. It was what is general belief : all people thought so. 49 When a ship is disabled, it is a wreck. Drake thought some of what is ships had been lost. 50 Or: left him, because what is crews did not want to stay with him. 510r: what is very south, the last point of South America. 52 We wash our hands with water in a basin. Here what is basin is a small haven. 53 There were high cliffs that kept off strong winds, so that what is water there was calm. When it rains very much, we stand under a tree ; what is tree shelters us from what is rain, it is our shelter. 54 Leaving what is ship, and going on to what is land. 55 what is cliff that was more to what is south than any other, what is most southerly cliff. 56 Comparative of far. 57 opp. the Arctic Ocean, in what is north. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , 001 , 002 , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 ,