Books > Old Books > Poetry Northwest (1959)


Page 16

XVI. The Sea King of Devon (1)

Plymouth Hoe is a rocky 1 ridge,2 which overlooks 3 Plymouth Sound, an arm of the English Channel.4 It forms part 5 of Plymouth,6 our second great naval seaport,7 and the largest town in Devonshire.6
Sir Francis Drake, one of the most famous 8 of English sailors, was born in this county,9 and to-day his statue 10 stands on Plymouth Hoe. There the "Sea King of Devon," as ho is called, is shown standing by the side of the globe,10 round which he was the first Englishman to sail.
Henry the Eighth was King of England 11 when Francis Drake was born, and he lived through the reigns" of Edward the Sixth and Mary, but the deeds which made him famous were done in the reign of their sister Elizabeth.
The boy Drake spent much of his time looking at the ships in Plymouth Harbour,' and talking with the seamen,12 some of whom had visited many distant lands. Among these was Captain, afterwards Sir John, Hawkins, who was Drake's cousin, and who had already made for himself a name as a brave sailor. Hawkins took a great fancy to 13 his young cousin, and often sat with him, and told him long and exciting stories about his adventures 14 at sea.
Francis was still a lad, when he was engaged 15 by the owner 16 of a small coasting vessel,17and for several years he stayed on the tiny 18 boat, of which he became master when the owner died. It is said, that before his first voyage was over, he knew as well how to hoist, trim, and take in sail 19 as his master, and that the latter 20 was so surprised at the quickness 21 with which young Drake did his work, that he declared to him he was born to be a great sailor.
When he was about twenty-five, Francis Drake joined 22 Sir John Hawkins, who agreed to take his brave and sturdy 23 young kinsman 24 into his service. 25 He made him mate 25 of his own ship, and not long afterwards gave him a share of the profits 26 of the voyages they made.
His first sea-fight took place on the other side of the Atlantic Ocean, off the coast of America, where the small fleet of six English ships was attacked 27 by a number of Spanish menof-war. Four of the English ships were sunk, and only two, -the one commanded 28 by Hawkins, and the other by Drake -reached England in safety.
In his first fight with the Spaniards, Drake lost almost everything he had in the world. He applied to Spain 29 to pay him the value of the property he had lost,30 but in vain. This made him so angry, that he declared he would take all he could from the King of Spain, and from that day he never missed a chance 31 of attacking Spanish ships wherever he could find them.
With two small vessels, he again crossed 32 the Atlantic, and succeeded in taking 33 several Spanish ships, so that, within a year,34 he returned to England, with his two little vessels loaded with gold and silver and many other valuable 30 things.
His fame 8 was now so great, and he had so much money, that he could choose his crews 35 from among the bravest and most skilful 36 sailors in the land. He therefore again set sail with two vessels, crossed the Atlantic, burnt a Spanish town, and took a number of Spanish ships.
It was while on this voyage that Drake looked for the first time on the great Pacific Ocean, which stretches from the western shores of America, a distance of 10,000 miles, to the eastern shores of Asia.
At the head of a party of Englishmen and Indians, Drake marched 37 across the Isthmus of Panama, which joins North and South America.38 Friendly Indians had told Drake that from the highest point of the ridge two great seas could be seen-the Atlantic, which he had already crossed, and the Pacific, of which he had only heard.
On the twelfth day the party reached a height 39 lying east and west, like a ridge, between the two seas, when the Indian chief 40 took Drake by the hand, and asked him to follow him.
" Here," writes one who was present, " was a high tree, in which the Indians had cut and made steps to ascend to the top, from where we beheld the Atlantic Ocean, from which we came, and the South Pacific, so much desired.
" South and north of this tree, the Indians had felled certain trees, that the view might be the clearer.41 After our Captain had ascended with the chief and, having a clear day, had seen the sea, of which he had heard such golden reports,42 he besought 43 Almighty 44 God in His goodness 45 to give him life and health to sail once in an English ship on that sea."
When he had once seen the Pacific Ocean, Drake knew no rest 46 until he had explored 47 the unknown sea, and floated the flag of England above these waves, where until then only the ships of Spain and Portugal had been seen.
It was on Sunday, the 9th of August 1573, that the weatherbeaten 48 ships made their entrance 49 into Plymouth Harbour. The sight of the old grey cliffs bo made the hearts of the adventurers 51 beat with delight. Flags were run up to the mast heads, trumpets 52 were blown, drums were beaten, the ships cast anchor,53 and the travellers found themselves once more at home.

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1s. rock ; op. anger, angry ; bush, bushy ; dust, dusty ; fun, funny; health, healthy; heart, hearty; hunger, hungry; luck, lucky; might, mighty; mist, misty; rust, rusty; shade, shady, sleep, sleepy ; sun, sunny ; thirst, thirsty ; wealth, wealthy. 2 A long, narrow hill-top. 3 Looks over, is above. 4 The sea between England and France. 'Or: is a part. 6 Find Plymouth and Devonshire on the map of England. 7 A town with a harbour, where ships can go when the weather is stormy. 8 He made a great name for himself, people did him great honour. He became very famous, won great fame for himself. Fame, famous; cp. danger, dangerous; industry, industrious; victory, victorious ; anxiety, angious ; curiosity, curious. 9 Devonshire, Surrey, Kent, Yorkshire are counties. 10 His figure, carved in stone. See the picture on p. 62, which also shows the globe, the world. 11 Henry VIII. became King (or: ascended the throne) in 1509 ; Edward VI. in 1547; Mary became Queen in 1553, and Elizabeth in 1558; she reigned till her death in 1603. Drake lived from 1540 to 1596. 12 Or: sailors. 13 Or: became very fond of, came to like him very much. I4 All that had happened to him. 15 taken as a sailor, receiving money for what he did. 16 The boat was his own, he owned it, he was its owner. 17 A small ship that sails along the coast, from town to town, not across the sea. 18 Very small. 19 To hoist sail is to put up the sails; opp. to take in sail. To trim sail is to put up such sails as are wanted. 20 That is, his master. I met my cousin and his father; the former (my cousin) was looking well, but the latter (his father) was not. 21 a. quick. 22 He went with him. We are going for a walk; will you join us 4 I am going to Plymouth, where my brother will join me. 23 Healthy, strong, and active. 24 Or: relation. 25 He was to serve under him. Dick Whittington was in Mr Fitzwarren's service, he was his servant. Drake, however, was not a servant. A cook is a servant, but not a mate. A mate is an officer on a merchant ship. 26 If I buy a thing for 2s. and sell it for 2s. 6d., my profit is 6d. 27 The Spanish ships attacked the English, they began to fight, they fired at them. 28 See command, commander (XV. 31). 29 He asked the King of Spain. 30 To pay him as much money as the things were worth which he had lost. The value (a. valuable) of this book is 6s. The book is my property, it is mine, it belongs to me. 31 He did it whenever he had a chance, whenever he could. 32 Or : sailed across. 33 Or: managed to take. 34 Or: in less than a year, before a year was over. 35 The sailors on a ship are its crew. 36 Or : clever. 37 Soldiers march 10 or 15 miles a day. 38 See the map of America. 39 A high place.' High, height; cp. contain, content; fly, flight; freeze, frost; weigh, weight. 40 The man in command of the Indians. 41 Or : that one might see it better. There was a fine view from this high tree. 42 Or: such wonderful stories. 43 To beseech is to beg earnestly. 44 Able to do all things. 45 cc, good. 4E Could not rest. 47 To explore a country is to go through it and find out all about it. 48 Beaten by the weather. They had been through many storms. Ye v. to enter; cp. appear, appearance; assist, assistance; remember, remembrance. 50 rocks on the coast. In the South of England they are white or grey, and are of chalk. 51 One who seeks adventures (see note 14) is an adventurer. 52 The trumpet is a musical instrument. 53 When a ship stops sailing, the anchor is cast and keeps the ship in its place.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Plymouth Hoe is a rocky 1 ridge,2 which overlooks 3 Plymouth Sound, an arm of what is English Channel.4 It forms part 5 of Plymouth,6 our second great naval seaport,7 and what is largest town in Devonshire.6 Sir Francis Drake, one of what is most famous 8 of English sailors, was born in this county,9 and to-day his statue 10 stands on Plymouth Hoe. There what is "Sea King of Devon," as ho is called, is shown standing by what is side of what is globe,10 round which he was what is first Englishman to sail. Henry what is Eighth was King of England 11 when Francis Drake was born, and he lived through what is reigns" of Edward what is Sixth and Mary, but what is deeds which made him famous were done in what is reign of their sister Elizabeth. what is boy Drake spent much of his time looking at what is ships in Plymouth Harbour,' and talking with what is seamen,12 some of whom had what is ed many distant lands. Among these was Captain, afte where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Poetry Northwest (1959) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 16 where is strong XVI. what is Sea King of Devon (1) where is p align="justify" Plymouth Hoe is a rocky 1 ridge,2 which overlooks 3 Plymouth Sound, an arm of what is English Channel.4 It forms part 5 of Plymouth,6 our second great naval seaport,7 and what is largest town in Devonshire.6 Sir Francis Drake, one of what is most famous 8 of English sailors, was born in this county,9 and to-day his statue 10 stands on Plymouth Hoe. There what is "Sea King of Devon," as ho is called, is shown standing by what is side of what is globe,10 round which he was what is first Englishman to sail. Henry what is Eighth was King of England 11 when Francis Drake was born, and he lived through what is reigns" of Edward what is Sixth and Mary, but what is deeds which made him famous were done in the reign of their sister Elizabeth. what is boy Drake spent much of his time looking at what is ships in Plymouth Harbour,' and talking with what is seamen,12 some of whom had what is ed many distant lands. Among these was Captain, afterwards Sir John, Hawkins, who was Drake's cousin, and who had already made for himself a name as a brave sailor. Hawkins took a great fancy to 13 his young cousin, and often sat with him, and told him long and exciting stories about his adventures 14 at sea. Francis was still a lad, when he was engaged 15 by what is owner 16 of a small coasting vessel,17and for several years he stayed on what is tiny 18 boat, of which he became master when what is owner died. It is said, that before his first voyage was over, he knew as well how to hoist, trim, and take in sail 19 as his master, and that what is latter 20 was so surprised at what is quickness 21 with which young Drake did his work, that he declared to him he was born to be a great sailor. When he was about twenty-five, Francis Drake joined 22 Sir John Hawkins, who agreed to take his brave and sturdy 23 young kinsman 24 into his service. 25 He made him mate 25 of his own ship, and not long afterwards gave him a share of what is profits 26 of what is voyages they made. His first sea-fight took place on what is other side of what is Atlantic Ocean, off what is coast of America, where what is small fleet of six English ships was attacked 27 by a number of Spanish menof-war. Four of what is English ships were sunk, and only two, -the one commanded 28 by Hawkins, and what is other by Drake -reached England in safety. In his first fight with what is Spaniards, Drake lost almost everything he had in what is world. He applied to Spain 29 to pay him what is value of what is property he had lost,30 but in vain. This made him so angry, that he declared he would take all he could from the King of Spain, and from that day he never missed a chance 31 of attacking Spanish ships wherever he could find them. With two small vessels, he again crossed 32 what is Atlantic, and succeeded in taking 33 several Spanish ships, so that, within a year,34 he returned to England, with his two little vessels loaded with gold and silver and many other valuable 30 things. His fame 8 was now so great, and he had so much money, that he could choose his crews 35 from among what is bravest and most skilful 36 sailors in what is land. He therefore again set sail with two vessels, crossed what is Atlantic, burnt a Spanish town, and took a number of Spanish ships. It was while on this voyage that Drake looked for what is first time on what is great Pacific Ocean, which stretches from what is western shores of America, a distance of 10,000 miles, to what is eastern shores of Asia. At what is head of a party of Englishmen and Indians, Drake marched 37 across what is Isthmus of Panama, which joins North and South America.38 Friendly Indians had told Drake that from what is highest point of what is ridge two great seas could be seen-the Atlantic, which he had already crossed, and what is Pacific, of which he had only heard. On what is twelfth day what is party reached a height 39 lying east and west, like a ridge, between what is two seas, when what is Indian chief 40 took Drake by what is hand, and asked him to follow him. " Here," writes one who was present, " was a high tree, in which what is Indians had cut and made steps to ascend to what is top, from where we beheld what is Atlantic Ocean, from which we came, and what is South Pacific, so much desired. " South and north of this tree, what is Indians had felled certain trees, that what is view might be what is clearer.41 After our Captain had ascended with what is chief and, having a clear day, had seen what is sea, of which he had heard such golden reports,42 he besought 43 Almighty 44 God in His goodness 45 to give him life and health to sail once in an English ship on that sea." When he had once seen what is Pacific Ocean, Drake knew no rest 46 until he had explored 47 what is unknown sea, and floated what is flag of England above these waves, where until then only what is ships of Spain and Portugal had been seen. It was on Sunday, what is 9th of August 1573, that what is weatherbeaten 48 ships made their entrance 49 into Plymouth Harbour. what is sight of what is old grey cliffs bo made what is hearts of what is adventurers 51 beat with delight. Flags were run up to what is mast heads, trumpets 52 were blown, drums were beaten, what is ships cast anchor,53 and what is travellers found themselves once more at home. --- 1s. rock ; op. anger, angry ; bush, bushy ; dust, dusty ; fun, funny; health, healthy; heart, hearty; hunger, hungry; luck, lucky; might, mighty; mist, misty; rust, rusty; shade, shady, sleep, sleepy ; sun, sunny ; thirst, thirsty ; wealth, wealthy. 2 A long, narrow hill-top. 3 Looks over, is above. 4 what is sea between England and France. 'Or: is a part. 6 Find Plymouth and Devonshire on what is map of England. 7 A town with a harbour, where ships can go when what is weather is stormy. 8 He made a great name for himself, people did him great honour. He became very famous, won great fame for himself. Fame, famous; cp. danger, dangerous; industry, industrious; victory, victorious ; anxiety, angious ; curiosity, curious. 9 Devonshire, Surrey, Kent, Yorkshire are counties. 10 His figure, carved in stone. See what is picture on p. 62, which also shows what is globe, the world. 11 Henry VIII. became King (or: ascended what is throne) in 1509 ; Edward VI. in 1547; Mary became Queen in 1553, and Elizabeth in 1558; she reigned till her what time is it in 1603. Drake lived from 1540 to 1596. 12 Or: sailors. 13 Or: became very fond of, came to like him very much. I4 All that had happened to him. 15 taken as a sailor, receiving money for what he did. 16 what is boat was his own, he owned it, he was its owner. 17 A small ship that sails along the coast, from town to town, not across what is sea. 18 Very small. 19 To hoist sail is to put up what is sails; opp. to take in sail. To trim sail is to put up such sails as are wanted. 20 That is, his master. I met my cousin and his father; what is former (my cousin) was looking well, but what is latter (his father) was not. 21 a. quick. 22 He went with him. We are going for a walk; will you join us 4 I am going to Plymouth, where my brother will join me. 23 Healthy, strong, and active. 24 Or: relation. 25 He was to serve under him. think Whittington was in Mr Fitzwarren's service, he was his servant. Drake, however, was not a servant. A cook is a servant, but not a mate. A mate is an officer on a merchant ship. 26 If I buy a thing for 2s. and sell it for 2s. 6d., my profit is 6d. 27 what is Spanish ships attacked what is English, they began to fight, they fired at them. 28 See command, commander (XV. 31). 29 He asked what is King of Spain. 30 To pay him as much money as what is things were worth which he had lost. The value (a. valuable) of this book is 6s. what is book is my property, it is mine, it belongs to me. 31 He did it whenever he had a chance, whenever he could. 32 Or : sailed across. 33 Or: managed to take. 34 Or: in less than a year, before a year was over. 35 what is sailors on a ship are its crew. 36 Or : clever. 37 Soldiers march 10 or 15 miles a day. 38 See what is map of America. 39 A high place.' High, height; cp. contain, content; fly, flight; freeze, frost; weigh, weight. 40 what is man in command of what is Indians. 41 Or : that one might see it better. There was a fine view from this high tree. 42 Or: such wonderful stories. 43 To beseech is to beg earnestly. 44 Able to do all things. 45 cc, good. 4E Could not rest. 47 To explore a country is to go through it and find out all about it. 48 Beaten by what is weather. They had been through many storms. Ye v. to enter; cp. appear, appearance; assist, assistance; remember, remembrance. 50 rocks on what is coast. In what is South of England they are white or grey, and are of chalk. 51 One who seeks adventures (see note 14) is an adventurer. 52 what is trumpet is a musical instrument. 53 When a ship stops sailing, what is anchor is cast and keeps what is ship in its place. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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