Books > Old Books > Poetry Northwest (1959)


Page 13

XIII. Rip Van Winkle (2)

He was surprised to see any human being in this lonely 1 place, but, supposing it to be some one of the neighbourhood in need of 2 assistance, he hastened s down to help him. The man bore 4 on his shoulder a fairly big keg b that seemed full of liquor's and made signs 7 for Rip to come and assist him with
the load.
As usual, Rip was ready to give his help, though he did not quite like the strange man's appearance.8 Together they climbed up a narrow gully,9 which seemed to be the dry bed of a mountain torrent.9
As they ascended,10 Rip every now and then11 heard sounds, like distant thunder,12 that seemed to come from a deep ravine.9 He stopped an instant, but supposing it to be one of those passing thunder showers which often take place among the mountains, he went on. Passing through the ravine, they came
to a hollow.13
On entering this hollow he perceived more strange things. In the middle was a company 14 of odd-looking 15 men playing at ninepins.16 They were dressed in a queer outlandish fashion,17 and all had beards, of different shapes and colours.
What seemed especially odd to Rip was, that though these people were amusing themselves, yet their faces were quite serious, they uttered never a word, and were the most mournful party 18 of pleasure he had ever seen.
As Rip and his companion approached them,19 they suddenly stopped their play and stared at him 20 in such a way that his heart was filled with fear.
His companion now emptied the contents of the keg 21 into large bottles, and made signs to him to wait on the company.22 He did so with fear and trembling; they drank the liquor in deep silence, and then returned to their game.
After a time Rip grew less afraid. When no eye was fixed on him, he even drank some of the liquor, which he found very agreeable. He was by nature a thirsty fellow and soon raised the bottle to his lips again. As no one seemed to notice him, he drank several times. At last his head grew heavy, and before long he fell into a deep sleep.
On waking,23 he found himself on the green hill from which he had first seen the queer old man. lie rubbed his eyes. It was a bright sunny morning. The birds were hopping and twittering among the bushes, and the squirrels were busy on the branches of the trees.
" Surely," thought Rip, "I have not slept here all night." lie remembered what had happened before he fell asleep. The strange man with the keg of liquor,-the mountain ravine,the hollow among the rocks,-the mournful party at ninepins, -the bottle.
" O! that bottle ! that dreadful bottle !" thought Rip ; "what excuse 24 shall I make to Dame Van Winkle?"
He looked round for his gun, but in place of the nice, clean gun he had taken with him, he found lying by him one that was covered with rust,25 and nearly falling to pieces. He now thought that the queer old man of the mountain had taken his own gun from him while he slept.
Wolf, too, had disappeared, but he might have wandered away in search 26 of a squirrel. He whistled after him and shouted his name, but all in vain. The echoes repeated 27 his whistle and shout,2S but no dog was to be seen.29
He determined 30 to revisit 31 the hollow, and, if he met any of the party, to demand his dog and gun. As he rose to walk, he found himself stiff3a and wanting in his usual activity.33
" These mountain beds do not agree with me 34," thought Rip, "and if this ramble should make me ill, I shall have to stay at home, and Dame Van Winkle will give me a nice time ! "
With some difficulty 35 he made his way down ; he found the gully which he and his companion had ascended the evening before; but, to his surprise, a mountain torrent was now flowing 36 down it.
He, however, managed to climb up its sides, working his way through thick bushes.
He again called and whistled after his dog. He was only answered by the cawing 37 of idle crows, flying high in the air about a dry tree that overhung a sunny rock.38
What was to be done 139 The morning was passing away,4o and Rip felt very hungry for want of his breakfast.41 ' He was sorry to lose his dog and gun ; he feared to meet his wife ; but he did not want to starve among the mountains. He shook his head, took up the rusty 25 gun, and, with a heart full of trouble and ansiety,42 turned his steps homeward.
As he approached the village he met a number of people, but none whom he knew, which rather surprised him, for he had thought that he knew everyone in the country round.43 Their dress, too, was of a different fashion from that to which he was used.
They all stared at him with signs of surprise also, and, whenever they looked at him, they all stroked their chins.44 This led Rip, after a time, to do the same, when, to his surprise, he found his beard had grown a foot long.
He had now reached the edge of the village. A number of strange children ran close behind him, calling after him, and pointing 45 at his grey beard. The dogs, too, not one of which he seemed to know, barked at him as he passed. The very
village 46 was changed. It was larger, and there were people in it.
There were rows of houses which he had never seen before, and those which he had often visited had disappeared. Strange names were over the doors, strange faces at the windows. Everything was strange.
Surely this was his own village, which he had left but the day before. There stood the Catskill Mountains. There ran the silver Hudson at a distance. There was every hill and dale 47 as it had always been. Rip did not know what to think of it.
" That bottle last night," thought he, "has made me see strange things !"

---
1It was lonely because people (human beings) rarely went there. 2 Or: wanting ; v. to need. This poor man is in need of food. 3 Or : hurried. 4 Qr : carried. fi Beer or wine is kept in kegs. A keg is smaller than a cask. Casks and kegs are made of wood and are usually kept in the cellar. g Water, wine, beer, etc., are liquors. 7 He did not speak, but made signs with his hand or his head. 8 v. to appear; the man appeared (or: seemed) queer. Cp, assist, assistance; remember, remembrance. 9 The water of a torrent (which is smaller and goes more quickly than a river) carries away the earth, and so has a deep bed. In the summer there is no water and the bed is dry. The sides are close together, and this makes a narrow gully, or ravine. When the sides are not so close together, the gully is not narrow, but wide. 10 opp. to descend. 11 Or : from time to time.12 In a storm we sometimes hear the thunder, after seeing the lightning. 13 A hollow place. 14 A number of people, who work or play together. 15 Or: strange-looking; they had an odd appearance. 18 A game in which a man throws a heavy ball at nine pieces of wood, so as to throw them over. 17 They had such clothes as one might find in another country. They did not wear the same kind of clothes as Rip. The fashion (in clothes) changes every year; people do not always dress in the same fashion (or way). 18 I invite my friends to a party on my birthday. 19 Or: came near to them. 20 They fixed their eyes on him, looked at him for some time. 21 Or: the liquor in the keg, what the keg contained. 22 Or : to pour out the liquor for the company, to fill their glasses.23 Or : when he woke. 24 v. to excuse (see IV. 7). How shall I excuse myself 4 What shall I say to excuse myself ! 25 When a piece of iron is left in water, it soon becomes brown, it is covered with rust, it is rusty. 26 v. to search (see IL 27). He had perhaps gone to search for a squirrel. 27 The echo repeats what we say, it says it again. The teacher sometimes says a word, and the boys repeat it. 28 v. to whistle, to shout. 29 Or: could be seen. 30 He said to himself: "I must go there again." 31 Or: to visit again. Cp. echo, re-echo ; turn, return. 32 He could not move his arms and legs easily. 33 He was not as active as usual. A boy or a young man can move about quickly. An old man is less active, he moves more slowly, and gets tired sooner. 34 Sleeping in the mountains is not good for me. 35 a. difficult. With difficulty : opp. easily. 36 The water of a torrent flows from the mountains towards the lower land. 37 Some birds twitter or sing; crows caw. 38 The tree was on the top of the rock, and some of its branches hung over the edge. 39 Or : what could he do l 40 It was getting near noon. 41 Or : because he had had no breakfast. 42 a. anxious. 43 In the country round his village, in the neighbourhood. 44 They passed their hands over their chins; see XI. 22. 45 With their fingers. Point to the door, to the window. 48 Or: even the village. 47 The dale is between the hills or mountains. We ran over hill and dale, up and down hill.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE He was surprised to see any human being in this lonely 1 place, but, supposing it to be some one of what is neighbourhood in need of 2 assistance, he hastened s down to help him. what is man bore 4 on his shoulder a fairly big keg b that seemed full of liquor's and made signs 7 for Rip to come and assist him with what is load. As usual, Rip was ready to give his help, though he did not quite like what is strange man's appearance.8 Together they climbed up a narrow gully,9 which seemed to be what is dry bed of a mountain torrent.9 As they ascended,10 Rip every now and then11 heard sounds, like distant thunder,12 that seemed to come from a deep ravine.9 He stopped an instant, but supposing it to be one of those passing thunder showers which often take place among what is mountains, he went on. Passing through what is ravine, they came to a hollow.13 On entering this hollow he perceived more strange things. In what is mid where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Poetry Northwest (1959) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 13 where is strong XIII. Rip Van Winkle (2) where is p align="justify" He was surprised to see any human being in this lonely 1 place, but, supposing it to be some one of what is neighbourhood in need of 2 assistance, he hastened s down to help him. what is man bore 4 on his shoulder a fairly big keg b that seemed full of liquor's and made signs 7 for Rip to come and assist him with what is load. As usual, Rip was ready to give his help, though he did not quite like what is strange man's appearance.8 Together they climbed up a narrow gully,9 which seemed to be what is dry bed of a mountain torrent.9 As they ascended,10 Rip every now and then11 heard sounds, like distant thunder,12 that seemed to come from a deep ravine.9 He stopped an instant, but supposing it to be one of those passing thunder showers which often take place among what is mountains, he went on. Passing through what is ravine, they came to a hollow.13 On entering this hollow he perceived more strange things. In the middle was a company 14 of odd-looking 15 men playing at ninepins.16 They were dressed in a queer outlandish fashion,17 and all had beards, of different shapes and colours. What seemed especially odd to Rip was, that though these people were amusing themselves, yet their faces were quite serious, they uttered never a word, and were what is most mournful party 18 of pleasure he had ever seen. As Rip and his companion approached them,19 they suddenly stopped their play and stared at him 20 in such a way that his heart was filled with fear. His companion now emptied what is contents of what is keg 21 into large bottles, and made signs to him to wait on what is company.22 He did so with fear and trembling; they drank what is liquor in deep silence, and then returned to their game. After a time Rip grew less afraid. When no eye was fixed on him, he even drank some of what is liquor, which he found very agreeable. He was by nature a thirsty fellow and soon raised what is bottle to his lips again. As no one seemed to notice him, he drank several times. At last his head grew heavy, and before long he fell into a deep sleep. On waking,23 he found himself on what is green hill from which he had first seen what is queer old man. lie rubbed his eyes. It was a bright sunny morning. what is birds were hopping and twittering among the bushes, and what is squirrels were busy on what is branches of what is trees. " Surely," thought Rip, "I have not slept here all night." lie remembered what had happened before he fell asleep. what is strange man with what is keg of liquor,-the mountain ravine,the hollow among what is rocks,-the mournful party at ninepins, -the bottle. " O! that bottle ! that dreadful bottle !" thought Rip ; "what excuse 24 shall I make to Dame Van Winkle?" He looked round for his gun, but in place of what is nice, clean gun he had taken with him, he found lying by him one that was covered with rust,25 and nearly falling to pieces. He now thought that what is queer old man of what is mountain had taken his own gun from him while he slept. Wolf, too, had disappeared, but he might have wandered away in search 26 of a squirrel. He whistled after him and shouted his name, but all in vain. what is echoes repeated 27 his whistle and shout,2S but no dog was to be seen.29 He determined 30 to re what is 31 what is hollow, and, if he met any of what is party, to demand his dog and gun. As he rose to walk, he found himself stiff3a and wanting in his usual activity.33 " These mountain beds do not agree with me 34," thought Rip, "and if this ramble should make me ill, I shall have to stay at home, and Dame Van Winkle will give me a nice time ! " With some difficulty 35 he made his way down ; he found what is gully which he and his companion had ascended what is evening before; but, to his surprise, a mountain torrent was now flowing 36 down it. He, however, managed to climb up its sides, working his way through thick bushes. He again called and whistled after his dog. He was only answered by what is cawing 37 of idle crows, flying high in what is air about a dry tree that overhung a sunny rock.38 What was to be done 139 what is morning was passing away,4o and Rip felt very hungry for want of his breakfast.41 ' He was sorry to lose his dog and gun ; he feared to meet his wife ; but he did not want to starve among what is mountains. He shook his head, took up what is rusty 25 gun, and, with a heart full of trouble and ansiety,42 turned his steps homeward. As he approached what is village he met a number of people, but none whom he knew, which rather surprised him, for he had thought that he knew everyone in what is country round.43 Their dress, too, was of a different fashion from that to which he was used. They all stared at him with signs of surprise also, and, whenever they looked at him, they all stroked their chins.44 This led Rip, after a time, to do what is same, when, to his surprise, he found his beard had grown a foot long. He had now reached what is edge of what is village. A number of strange children ran close behind him, calling after him, and pointing 45 at his grey beard. what is dogs, too, not one of which he seemed to know, barked at him as he passed. what is very village 46 was changed. It was larger, and there were people in it. There were rows of houses which he had never seen before, and those which he had often what is ed had disappeared. Strange names were over what is doors, strange faces at what is windows. Everything was strange. Surely this was his own village, which he had left but what is day before. There stood what is Cats what time is it Mountains. There ran what is silver Hudson at a distance. There was every hill and dale 47 as it had always been. Rip did not know what to think of it. " That bottle last night," thought he, "has made me see strange things !" --- 1It was lonely because people (human beings) rarely went there. 2 Or: wanting ; v. to need. This poor man is in need of food. 3 Or : hurried. 4 Qr : carried. fi Beer or wine is kept in kegs. A keg is smaller than a cask. Casks and kegs are made of wood and are usually kept in what is cellar. g Water, wine, beer, etc., are liquors. 7 He did not speak, but made signs with his hand or his head. 8 v. to appear; what is man appeared (or: seemed) queer. Cp, assist, assistance; remember, remembrance. 9 what is water of a torrent (which is smaller and goes more quickly than a river) carries away what is earth, and so has a deep bed. In what is summer there is no water and what is bed is dry. what is sides are close together, and this makes a narrow gully, or ravine. When what is sides are not so close together, what is gully is not narrow, but wide. 10 opp. to descend. 11 Or : from time to time.12 In a storm we sometimes hear the thunder, after seeing the lightning. 13 A hollow place. 14 A number of people, who work or play together. 15 Or: strange-looking; they had an odd appearance. 18 A game in which a man throws a heavy ball at nine pieces of wood, so as to throw them over. 17 They had such clothes as one might find in another country. They did not wear what is same kind of clothes as Rip. what is fashion (in clothes) changes every year; people do not always dress in what is same fashion (or way). 18 I invite my friends to a party on my birthday. 19 Or: came near to them. 20 They fixed their eyes on him, looked at him for some time. 21 Or: what is liquor in what is keg, what what is keg contained. 22 Or : to pour out what is liquor for what is company, to fill their glasses.23 Or : when he woke. 24 v. to excuse (see IV. 7). How shall I excuse myself 4 What shall I say to excuse myself ! 25 When a piece of iron is left in water, it soon becomes brown, it is covered with rust, it is rusty. 26 v. to search (see IL 27). He had perhaps gone to search for a squirrel. 27 what is echo repeats what we say, it says it again. The teacher sometimes says a word, and what is boys repeat it. 28 v. to whistle, to shout. 29 Or: could be seen. 30 He said to himself: "I must go there again." 31 Or: to what is again. Cp. echo, re-echo ; turn, return. 32 He could not move his arms and legs easily. 33 He was not as active as usual. A boy or a young man can move about quickly. An old man is less active, he moves more slowly, and gets tired sooner. 34 Sleeping in what is mountains is not good for me. 35 a. difficult. With difficulty : opp. easily. 36 what is water of a torrent flows from what is mountains towards what is lower land. 37 Some birds twitter or sing; crows caw. 38 what is tree was on what is top of what is rock, and some of its branches hung over what is edge. 39 Or : what could he do l 40 It was getting near noon. 41 Or : because he had had no breakfast. 42 a. anxious. 43 In what is country round his village, in what is neighbourhood. 44 They passed their hands over their chins; see XI. 22. 45 With their fingers. Point to what is door, to what is window. 48 Or: even what is village. 47 what is dale is between what is hills or mountains. We ran over hill and dale, up and down hill. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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