Books > Old Books > Poetry Northwest (1959)


Page 12

XII. Rip Van Winkle (1)

Whoever has made a voyage up the Hudson 1 must remember the Catskill Mountains. They are a branch of the great Appalachian family,2 and are seen away to the west of the river, lording 3 it over the surrounding country.
Every change of season, every change of weather, indeed every hour of the day, makes some change in the wonderful hues 4 and shapes 5 of these mountains, and all the good wives, far and near, say that they are perfect 6 barometers.7
At the foot of these mountains the traveller may have seen the light smoke rising up from a village, whose roofs gleams among the trees. In that same village there lived many years ago, while the country was a province of Great Britain,9 a simple 10 good-natured" fellow, of the name of Rip Van Winkle.
The children of the village would shout 12 with joy whenever he appeared. He assisted 13 at their games, made their playthings,14 taught them to fly kites,15 and told them long stories.
He was always ready to assist a neighbour even in the hardest work. The women of the village, too, used to employ him 16 to do such little odd jobs17 as their less obliging 18 husbands would not do for them. In a`vurd, Rip was ready to attend to 19 anybody's business but his own : and as to doing work at home, and keeping his farm in order, he found it impossible.20
He declared it was of no use to work on his farm. It was the most worthless little piece of ground in the whole country. Everything about it went wrong, and would go wrong, in spite of him.21 His children, too, were as ragged and wild as if they belonged to nobody. His son Rip, a boy in his own likeness,22 promised to inherit 23 the habits with the old clothes of his father. Rip Van Winkle, however, was one of these happy foolish fellows who eat white bread or brown, whichever can be got with least thought or trouble, and would rather starve 24 on a penny than work for a pound.
If left to himself, he would have whistled life away 25 in perfect contentment 26 ; but his wife kept continually 27 scolding him for his idleness 28 and his carelessness.28 Morning, noon, and night, her tongue was always going, and everything he said or did was sure to be wrong and to make her talk. Rip had but one way of replying to her scolding, and that, bv frequent use,29 had grown into a habit. He shrugged 3o his shoulders, shook his head, but said nothing.
This, however, always led to a fresh scolding from his wife. So he thought it better to leave her, and to take to the outside of the house,-the only side which, in truth,31 belongs to a lazy husband. .
Rip's only friend in the house was his dog Wolf, who was as much grumbled at 32 as his master; for Dame Van Winkle thought them companions 33 in idleness.
Often poor Rip felt he could stand 34 it no longer. To escape 35 from work on the farm and the loud tongue of his wife, he then took his gun 36 and wandered away into the woods.
Here he would sometimes seat himself at the foot of a tree, and share 37 his meal with Wolf, his companion.
" Poor Wolf," he would say,38 " your mistress treats you very badly; but as long as I am alive, vou have a good friend."
Wolf would wag his tail,39 and look up into his master's face, as if he quite understood, and felt no less sorry for Rip than Rip felt for him.
In a long ramble 40 of this kind on a fine autumn day, Rip had reached one of the highest parts of the Catskill Mountains. He was busy shooting 36 squirrels, and the silent woods had echoed 41 and re-echoed 41 with the reports 42 of his gun.
At last he felt tired and threw himself, late in the afternoon, on a little green hill. From an opening43 between the trees he could see all the lower country for many a mile of rich
woodland.44
As he was going to descend,45 he heard a voice from a distance calling out :
" Rip Van Winkle ! Rip Van Winkle !"
He looked around, but he could see nothing but a crow flying across the mountain.
He thought he had made a mistake, and turned again to descend, when he heard the same cry ringing 46 through the still evening air :
I°Rip Van Wiukle! Rip Van Winkle!"
At the same time Wolf bristled up his back,47 and, giving a low grow1,48 came to his master's side, looking fearfully 49 down among the trees.
Rip now felt a kind of fear coming over him. He looked anxiously in the same direction,50 and perceived 51 a strange figure slowly climbing up the rocks, and bending 52 under the weight of something he carried on his back.

---
1 Anyone who has sailed up the Hudson, a great river in the United States of America. New York is on the Hudson. We travel up a river, when we go farther and farther from its mouth, not in the same direction as the water. 2 They are part of the Appalachian Mountains. 3 A lord is a man of noble family. These mountains lorded it over the surrounding couutry : they seemed proud and grand. 4 Or : colours. 5 A ball has a round shape, it is round in shape. Draw the shape of a mountain on the blackboard. 6 A thing is perfect when it is as good as it can possibly be. We say "It is a perfect day," when the weather is very fine. Sometimes we say "perfectly" for "quite' : These flowers are perfectly beautiful. 7 A barometer is an instrument which shows us what the weather will be. 8 Or : shine, are bright. 9 A province is part of a country. The country now called the United States belonged to Great Britain until 1776. 10 He was not very clever, did not think very much. 11 He had a good nature, a kind heart ; he was not illtempered. Cp. goodsized (XI. 11).12 They used to cry out aloud, it made them so happy to see him, they rejoiced when he came to them. 13 Or: helped them, gave them assistance. 14 Things that they could use in their games. 15 Kites are made of paper (or cloth) and wood. A long string is tied to them. The wind carries the kite along, but we hold one end of the string. Do you know the shape of a kite? 16 Or: make use of him. 17 Small pieces of work. 18 Ready to help, willing to do something for others. 19 Or: to see to, to look after. 20 It seemed to him that he could not do any odd jobs in his own house or attend to his farm. 21 Or : however much he worked, whatever he did. 22 Or: very much like him. Cp. bright, brightness; busy, business; cheerful, cheerfulness; clever, cleverness ; dark, darkness; forgetful, forgetfulness; happy, happiness; kind, kindness; sad, sadness; ugly, ugliness. 23 When a father dies, his wife and children inherit what he has left. Here "inherit" means to receive from the father, although the father is still alive. 24 Or : die of hunger. 25 Or: spent his life in whistling, done nothing but whistle. 26 Adj. contented ; in perfect contentment : quite happily, not wishing for anything better. 27 v. to continue (see L 28); continually, without stopping. She was always scolding him. 28 Substantives to idle and to careless, opp. careful. Care, careless ; cp. worth, worthless. 29 Or: because he did it so frequently (or: often). 30 A man shrugs his shoulders to show that he does not care. 31 Adj. true : cp. warm, warmth ; long, length; strong, strength. 32 His mistress grumbled at him, she was unkind to him and showed it by her words. 33 They were idle together. When I go for a walk with a friend, he is my companion. 34 Or: bear. It was more than he could bear. 35 Or : get away.36 A man who hunts has a gun with which he shoots rabbits, bears, wolves, birds, etc. I shot a rabbit; I have shot two crows. 37 He gave the dog part of his meal, the dog received a share (or: part) of it. 38 Or: frequently said, used to say. 39 A dog, when pleased, wags his tail. Past : wugged ; cp. beg. begged. 40 We ramble when we take a walk for pleasure, and go along slowly. 41 Sometimes, when we shout, the sound of our voice comes back to us, we hear the echo. The woods echoed and reechoed : they sent the echo back more than once. 42 When we shoot, there is a loud report, the gun goes "Bang! " 43 Adj. open ; v. to open. Cp. to begin, a beginning ; to build, a building; to feel, a feeling; to live, a living; to warn, a warning. 44 Land covered with trees. 45 Or : go down (the hill). 46 The cry (v. to cry) sounded clearly, like a bell (see X. 48). 47 The hair of his back stood on end. 48 v. to growl. 49 Full of fear ; cp. beautiful, careful, cheerful, delightful, dreadful, forgetful, harmful, hopeful, joyful, mournful, thankful, thoughtful, useful, wonderful. 50 He turned his eyes towards the same place as the dog had done. 51 Or : saw, noticed, beheld. 52 He could not stand straight because of the heavy weight on his back. Past : bent.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Whoever has made a voyage up what is Hudson 1 must remember what is Cats what time is it Mountains. They are a branch of what is great Appalachian family,2 and are seen away to what is west of what is river, lording 3 it over what is surrounding country. Every change of season, every change of weather, indeed every hour of what is day, makes some change in what is wonderful hues 4 and shapes 5 of these mountains, and all what is good wives, far and near, say that they are perfect 6 barometers.7 At what is foot of these mountains what is traveller may have seen what is light smoke rising up from a village, whose roofs gleams among what is trees. In that same village there lived many years ago, while what is country was a province of Great Britain,9 a simple 10 good-natured" fellow, of what is name of Rip Van Winkle. what is children of what is village would shout 12 with joy whenever he appeared. He assisted 13 at their games, made their playthings,14 taught what is where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Poetry Northwest (1959) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 12 where is strong XII. Rip Van Winkle (1) where is p align="justify" Whoever has made a voyage up what is Hudson 1 must remember what is Cats what time is it Mountains. They are a branch of what is great Appalachian family,2 and are seen away to what is west of what is river, lording 3 it over what is surrounding country. Every change of season, every change of weather, indeed every hour of what is day, makes some change in what is wonderful hues 4 and shapes 5 of these mountains, and all what is good wives, far and near, say that they are perfect 6 barometers.7 At what is foot of these mountains what is traveller may have seen the light smoke rising up from a village, whose roofs gleams among what is trees. In that same village there lived many years ago, while what is country was a province of Great Britain,9 a simple 10 good-natured" fellow, of what is name of Rip Van Winkle. what is children of what is village would shout 12 with joy whenever he appeared. He assisted 13 at their games, made their playthings,14 taught them to fly kites,15 and told them long stories. He was always ready to assist a neighbour even in what is hardest work. what is women of what is village, too, used to employ him 16 to do such little odd jobs17 as their less obliging 18 husbands would not do for them. In a`vurd, Rip was ready to attend to 19 anybody's business but his own : and as to doing work at home, and keeping his farm in order, he found it impossible.20 He declared it was of no use to work on his farm. It was what is most worthless little piece of ground in what is whole country. Everything about it went wrong, and would go wrong, in spite of him.21 His children, too, were as ragged and wild as if they belonged to nobody. His son Rip, a boy in his own likeness,22 promised to inherit 23 what is habits with what is old clothes of his father. Rip Van Winkle, however, was one of these happy foolish fellows who eat white bread or brown, whichever can be got with least thought or trouble, and would rather starve 24 on a penny than work for a pound. If left to himself, he would have whistled life away 25 in perfect contentment 26 ; but his wife kept continually 27 scolding him for his idleness 28 and his carelessness.28 Morning, noon, and night, her tongue was always going, and everything he said or did was sure to be wrong and to make her talk. Rip had but one way of replying to her scolding, and that, bv frequent use,29 had grown into a habit. He shrugged 3o his shoulders, shook his head, but said nothing. This, however, always led to a fresh scolding from his wife. So he thought it better to leave her, and to take to what is outside of what is house,-the only side which, in truth,31 belongs to a lazy husband. . Rip's only friend in what is house was his dog Wolf, who was as much grumbled at 32 as his master; for Dame Van Winkle thought them companions 33 in idleness. Often poor Rip felt he could stand 34 it no longer. To escape 35 from work on what is farm and what is loud tongue of his wife, he then took his gun 36 and wandered away into what is woods. Here he would sometimes seat himself at what is foot of a tree, and share 37 his meal with Wolf, his companion. " Poor Wolf," he would say,38 " your mistress treats you very badly; but as long as I am alive, vou have a good friend." Wolf would wag his tail,39 and look up into his master's face, as if he quite understood, and felt no less sorry for Rip than Rip felt for him. In a long ramble 40 of this kind on a fine autumn day, Rip had reached one of what is highest parts of what is Cats what time is it Mountains. He was busy shooting 36 squirrels, and what is silent woods had echoed 41 and re-echoed 41 with what is reports 42 of his gun. At last he felt tired and threw himself, late in what is afternoon, on a little green hill. From an opening43 between what is trees he could see all what is lower country for many a mile of rich woodland.44 As he was going to descend,45 he heard a voice from a distance calling out : " Rip Van Winkle ! Rip Van Winkle !" He looked around, but he could see nothing but a crow flying across what is mountain. He thought he had made a mistake, and turned again to descend, when he heard what is same cry ringing 46 through what is still evening air : I°Rip Van Wiukle! Rip Van Winkle!" At what is same time Wolf bristled up his back,47 and, giving a low grow1,48 came to his master's side, looking fearfully 49 down among what is trees. Rip now felt a kind of fear coming over him. He looked anxiously in what is same direction,50 and perceived 51 a strange figure slowly climbing up what is rocks, and bending 52 under what is weight of something he carried on his back. --- 1 Anyone who has sailed up what is Hudson, a great river in what is United States of America. New York is on what is Hudson. We travel up a river, when we go farther and farther from its mouth, not in what is same direction as what is water. 2 They are part of what is Appalachian Mountains. 3 A lord is a man of noble family. These mountains lorded it over what is surrounding couutry : they seemed proud and grand. 4 Or : colours. 5 A ball has a round shape, it is round in shape. Draw the shape of a mountain on what is blackboard. 6 A thing is perfect when it is as good as it can possibly be. We say "It is a perfect day," when what is weather is very fine. Sometimes we say "perfectly" for "quite' : These flowers are perfectly beautiful. 7 A barometer is an instrument which shows us what what is weather will be. 8 Or : shine, are bright. 9 A province is part of a country. what is country now called what is United States belonged to Great Britain until 1776. 10 He was not very clever, did not think very much. 11 He had a good nature, a kind heart ; he was not illtempered. Cp. goodsized (XI. 11).12 They used to cry out aloud, it made them so happy to see him, they rejoiced when he came to them. 13 Or: helped them, gave them assistance. 14 Things that they could use in their games. 15 Kites are made of paper (or cloth) and wood. A long string is tied to them. what is wind carries what is kite along, but we hold one end of what is string. Do you know what is shape of a kite? 16 Or: make use of him. 17 Small pieces of work. 18 Ready to help, willing to do something for others. 19 Or: to see to, to look after. 20 It seemed to him that he could not do any odd jobs in his own house or attend to his farm. 21 Or : however much he worked, whatever he did. 22 Or: very much like him. Cp. bright, brightness; busy, business; cheerful, cheerfulness; clever, cleverness ; dark, darkness; forgetful, forgetfulness; happy, happiness; kind, kindness; sad, sadness; ugly, ugliness. 23 When a father dies, his wife and children inherit what he has left. Here "inherit" means to receive from what is father, although what is father is still alive. 24 Or : die of hunger. 25 Or: spent his life in whistling, done nothing but whistle. 26 Adj. contented ; in perfect contentment : quite happily, not wishing for anything better. 27 v. to continue (see L 28); continually, without stopping. She was always scolding him. 28 Substantives to idle and to careless, opp. careful. Care, careless ; cp. worth, worthless. 29 Or: because he did it so frequently (or: often). 30 A man shrugs his shoulders to show that he does not care. 31 Adj. true : cp. warm, warmth ; long, length; strong, strength. 32 His mistress grumbled at him, she was unkind to him and showed it by her words. 33 They were idle together. When I go for a walk with a friend, he is my companion. 34 Or: bear. It was more than he could bear. 35 Or : get away.36 A man who hunts has a gun with which he shoots rabbits, bears, wolves, birds, etc. I shot a rabbit; I have shot two crows. 37 He gave what is dog part of his meal, what is dog received a share (or: part) of it. 38 Or: frequently said, used to say. 39 A dog, when pleased, wags his tail. Past : wugged ; cp. beg. begged. 40 We ramble when we take a walk for pleasure, and go along slowly. 41 Sometimes, when we shout, what is sound of our voice comes back to us, we hear what is echo. The woods echoed and reechoed : they sent what is echo back more than once. 42 When we shoot, there is a loud report, what is gun goes "Bang! " 43 Adj. open ; v. to open. Cp. to begin, a beginning ; to build, a building; to feel, a feeling; to live, a living; to warn, a warning. 44 Land covered with trees. 45 Or : go down (the hill). 46 what is cry (v. to cry) sounded clearly, like a bell (see X. 48). 47 what is hair of his back stood on end. 48 v. to growl. 49 Full of fear ; cp. beautiful, careful, cheerful, delightful, dreadful, forgetful, harmful, hopeful, joyful, mournful, thankful, thoughtful, useful, wonderful. 50 He turned his eyes towards what is same place as what is dog had done. 51 Or : saw, noticed, beheld. 52 He could not stand straight because of what is heavy weight on his back. Past : bent. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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