Books > Old Books > Poetry Northwest (1959)


Page 11

XI. Dick Whittington and his Cat (2)

Mr Fitzwarren's ship was a long time at sea,1 and was at last driven by the winds on a part of the coast 2 of Barbary,3
where the only people
were Moors, whom the English had never seen before. They soon came to the ship and admired 4 the fine wares and wanted to buy them.
The captain, however,
sent patterns5 of the best things he had to the king of the country, who was so much pleased with them, that he invited the captain to a grand dinner at the
palace.6 On arriving there, he was given a seat near the King and the Queen.6 Many dishes 7 were then brought in for dinner ; but very soon a huge number of rats and mice rushed in, helping themselves 8 from almost every dish. The captain wondered 9 at this, and asked one who sat next to him, if 10 this was not very unpleasant.
" Oh yes," was the reply, "most unpleasant. The King would give almost 11 anything to get rid of them. They eat part of his dinner, they go into his own room, and even run over his bed."
Then the captain had a happy thought 12 ; he remembered the cat that poor Dick Whittington had given him, and told the King he had a creature on board the ship 13 that would kill all these rats and mice on the spot. The King was more than glad 14 to hear this, but could hardly believe it was true.15" Go and bring this creature to me," he cried, " and if it is able to do what you say, I will load your ship with gold and jewels,16 in exchange 17 for it."
The captain, who was a good business man,18 replied :
" I shall be happy to let you see the creature, but I am not sure whether I can sell it. The mice and rats might come and eat the wares in our ship." "Run, run," said the Queen. " I am anxious 19 to see the dear creature."
So the captain went to the ship, while another meal was got ready and placed on the tables. He returned just as the mice and rats began to appear.20 When the cat saw them, she jumped from the captain's arms, and in a few minutes quite a number of rats and mice lay dead at her feet. The rest of them had run away and disappeared in their holes.
The King and Queen were delighted, and asked that the creature should be brought to them. So the captain called "Puss, Puss, Puss," and she came to him. At first the Queen was afraid to touch 21 her; but the captain stroked 22 her, and said "Pussy" to her, and the Queen then stroked her too, and said " Pussy" as well as she could-for she did not know English. Then the cat was allowed to rest on the Queen's lap, and sat there purring,23 until she fell asleep.
The King said he must have the cat, so that he might never again be troubled by mice and rats. He agreed to buy the whole of the ship's cargo 24 at a very good price, and paid ten times as much for the cat as for the cargo !
The captain then took leave 25 of the King and Queen, and after a happy voyage 28 arrived safe in London.
He made his way 27 to the house of his master, Mr Fitzwarren, who was delighted when the captain showed him some of the fine jewels he had received from the King or Barbary. The captain then told him of the rich present which the King and Queen had sent to Dick, in exchange for his cat. As soon as the merchant heard this, he told one of the servants to go and fetch him. "And be careful,"28 he added, "to call him Mr Whittington."
Dick, at the time, was cleaning things in the kitchen, and his hands were dirty; but he had to do as he was told, and followed the servant to Mr Fitzwarren's room. He was asked to sit down on a chair; but he thought they were making fun of him,29 and begged them to let him go back to his work. i'hen Mr Fitzwarren said :
" Indeed, Mr Whittington, we are all quite in earnest with you, and I most heartily 3° rejoice in your good fortune; for the captain has sold your cat to the King of Barbary, and brought you in return for her 31 more riches 32 than I possess in the whole world ; and I wish you may long enjoy 33 them."
Then all the gold and jewels were shown to Dick, and he could hardly believe his eyes. He begged his master to take what part of it he pleased, since he owed it all to his kindness.
" No, no," answered Mr Fitzwarren. "This is all your own; and I am sure you will
use it well." 34
Dick then asked his mistress, and Miss Alice, to accept 35 a part of his treasures ; but they would not, and at the same time told him that they rejoiced greatly at his good fortune. Dick was too kind-hearted 36 to keep it all to himself ; he gave a present to the captain and to each of the servants in the house, not forgetting even the ill-tempered old cook.
Then Mr Fitzwarren advised him to get himself dressed like a gentleman, and told him that he might live in his house as a friend until he should find a better house for himself.
When he was dressed in nice clothes, Dick was as handsome as any young man that visited Mr Fitzwarren's house. Miss Alice had always been kind to him. When he was poor, she had felt sorry for him, for she bad seen how bright he was, and had often thought him too good for the kitchen. Now that he was a rich gentleman, and her father's friend, she saw more of him ; and after some time her father saw that they loved each other. A day for the wedding 37 was fised,38 and a splendid" wedding it was. Many of the richest merchants in London were there, and even the Lord Mayor himself.
Mr Whittington and his lady lived in great splendour 39 and were very happy. He was liked by everybody, and even became Lord Mayor, as the bells of Bow Church had promised him, long before. From King Henry V.40 he received the honour of knighthood.41
The figure of Sir Richard Whittington with his cat in his arms, carved 42 in stone, was to be seen till the year 1780 on the wall of the old prison of Newgate.

---
1 It was a long time before the ship came to land. 2 The coast of a country is that part of it which is washed by the sea. 3 In Africa. 4 We admire a beautiful sunset, the flowers in spring, a clever man. The Moors said: " How beautiful these things are !" The wares filled them with admiration. 5 Not all the best things, but some of each kind. We sometimes ask a merchant to send us a pattern of his wares ; if we like it, wo tell him to send a dozen. 6 The king and the queen (his wife) live in a beautiful palace. 7 Our food is placed on dishes in the kitchen, and then brought into the dining-room. 8 Or: taking what they pleased. s Or : was surprised. 10 Or : whether. 11 Nearly, not quite. We say : it is almost seven, when it will soon be seven. I have almost finished my work : it will be finished in a few minutes. 12 Or : a good idea. 13 Or : on the ship. 14 Or: rejoiced greatly, was delighted. 15 Or : it seemed too good to be true. 16 Such as diamonds, emeralds, rubies. 17 I shall give you gold, if you give me the cat. 18 Or : who knew how to sell things at a good price. 19 Or : I very much want. 20 Or : show themselves. 21 To place her hand on the cat. 22 Passed his hand over the cat's back. A father sometimes strokes the head of his little child. 23 When a cat is contented, she makes a noise which is called purring. Y4 All the wares on board the ship ; all that Mr Fitzwarren had put in the ship. 25 Or: said Good-bye. 26A journey across the sea. 27 Or: went. 28 Or : take care, do not forget. 29 Or : laughing at him: opp. to treat seriously. 30 Or: with all my heart. 310r : in exchange for her, or : in place of her, instead of her. 32 Or: wealth, money. 33 Feel joy. We enjoy a thing when it gives us joy. I enjoy a walk in the woods : it gives me pleasure to walk through the woods. See V1II. 19. '34 Or : make good use of it. 3s Or: take as a present. 36 Or : had too kind a heart. 37 Or: marriage. 38 They chose a day for the wedding. 39 Grand, wonderful, very fine; s, splendour. 40 He was King of England from 1413 to 1422. 41 He was made a knight. 42 Cut.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Mr Fitzwarren's ship was a long time at sea,1 and was at last driven by what is winds on a part of what is coast 2 of Barbary,3 where what is only people were Moors, whom what is English had never seen before. They soon came to what is ship and admired 4 what is fine wares and wanted to buy them. what is captain, however, sent patterns5 of what is best things he had to what is king of what is country, who was so much pleased with them, that he invited what is captain to a grand dinner at what is palace.6 On arriving there, he was given a seat near what is King and what is Queen.6 Many dishes 7 were then brought in for dinner ; but very soon a huge number of rats and mice rushed in, helping themselves 8 from almost every dish. what is captain wondered 9 at this, and asked one who sat next to him, if 10 this was not very unpleasant. " Oh yes," was what is reply, "most unpleasant. what is King would give almost 11 anything to get rid of them. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Poetry Northwest (1959) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 11 where is strong XI. think Whittington and his Cat (2) where is p align="justify" Mr Fitzwarren's ship was a long time at sea,1 and was at last driven by what is winds on a part of what is coast 2 of Barbary,3 where what is only people were Moors, whom what is English had never seen before. They soon came to what is ship and admired 4 what is fine wares and wanted to buy them. what is captain, however, sent patterns5 of what is best things he had to what is king of what is country, who was so much pleased with them, that he invited what is captain to a grand dinner at what is palace.6 On arriving there, he was given a seat near what is King and what is Queen.6 Many dishes 7 were then brought in for dinner ; but very soon a huge number of rats and mice rushed in, helping themselves 8 from almost every dish. what is captain wondered 9 at this, and asked one who sat next to him, if 10 this was not very unpleasant. " Oh yes," was what is reply, "most unpleasant. what is King would give almost 11 anything to get rid of them. They eat part of his dinner, they go into his own room, and even run over his bed." Then what is captain had a happy thought 12 ; he remembered what is cat that poor think Whittington had given him, and told what is King he had a creature on board what is ship 13 that would stop all these rats and mice on what is spot. what is King was more than glad 14 to hear this, but could hardly believe it was true.15" Go and bring this creature to me," he cried, " and if it is able to do what you say, I will load your ship with gold and jewels,16 in exchange 17 for it." what is captain, who was a good business man,18 replied : " I shall be happy to let you see what is creature, but I am not sure whether I can sell it. what is mice and rats might come and eat what is wares in our ship." "Run, run," said the Queen. " I am anxious 19 to see what is dear creature." So what is captain went to what is ship, while another meal was got ready and placed on what is tables. He returned just as what is mice and rats began to appear.20 When what is cat saw them, she jumped from what is captain's arms, and in a few minutes quite a number of rats and mice lay dead at her feet. what is rest of them had run away and disappeared in their holes. what is King and Queen were delighted, and asked that what is creature should be brought to them. So what is captain called "Puss, Puss, Puss," and she came to him. At first what is Queen was afraid to touch 21 her; but what is captain stroked 22 her, and said " time " to her, and what is Queen then stroked her too, and said " time " as well as she could-for she did not know English. Then what is cat was allowed to rest on what is Queen's lap, and sat there purring,23 until she fell asleep. what is King said he must have what is cat, so that he might never again be troubled by mice and rats. He agreed to buy what is whole of the ship's cargo 24 at a very good price, and paid ten times as much for what is cat as for what is cargo ! what is captain then took leave 25 of what is King and Queen, and after a happy voyage 28 arrived safe in London. He made his way 27 to what is house of his master, Mr Fitzwarren, who was delighted when what is captain showed him some of what is fine jewels he had received from what is King or Barbary. what is captain then told him of what is rich present which what is King and Queen had sent to Dick, in exchange for his cat. As soon as what is merchant heard this, he told one of what is servants to go and fetch him. "And be careful,"28 he added, "to call him Mr Whittington." Dick, at what is time, was cleaning things in what is kitchen, and his hands were dirty; but he had to do as he was told, and followed what is servant to Mr Fitzwarren's room. He was asked to sit down on a chair; but he thought they were making fun of him,29 and begged them to let him go back to his work. i'hen Mr Fitzwarren said : " Indeed, Mr Whittington, we are all quite in earnest with you, and I most heartily 3° rejoice in your good fortune; for what is captain has sold your cat to what is King of Barbary, and brought you in return for her 31 more riches 32 than I possess in what is whole world ; and I wish you may long enjoy 33 them." Then all what is gold and jewels were shown to Dick, and he could hardly believe his eyes. He begged his master to take what part of it he pleased, since he owed it all to his kindness. " No, no," answered Mr Fitzwarren. "This is all your own; and I am sure you will use it well." 34 think then asked his mistress, and Miss Alice, to accept 35 a part of his treasures ; but they would not, and at what is same time told him that they rejoiced greatly at his good fortune. think was too kind-hearted 36 to keep it all to himself ; he gave a present to what is captain and to each of what is servants in what is house, not forgetting even what is ill-tempered old cook. Then Mr Fitzwarren advised him to get himself dressed like a gentleman, and told him that he might live in his house as a friend until he should find a better house for himself. When he was dressed in nice clothes, think was as handsome as any young man that what is ed Mr Fitzwarren's house. Miss Alice had always been kind to him. When he was poor, she had felt sorry for him, for she bad seen how bright he was, and had often thought him too good for what is kitchen. Now that he was a rich gentleman, and her father's friend, she saw more of him ; and after some time her father saw that they loved each other. A day for what is wedding 37 was fised,38 and a splendid" wedding it was. Many of what is richest merchants in London were there, and even what is Lord Mayor himself. Mr Whittington and his lady lived in great splendour 39 and were very happy. He was liked by everybody, and even became Lord Mayor, as what is bells of Bow Church had promised him, long before. From King Henry V.40 he received what is honour of knighthood.41 what is figure of Sir Richard Whittington with his cat in his arms, carved 42 in stone, was to be seen till what is year 1780 on what is wall of what is old prison of Newgate. --- 1 It was a long time before what is ship came to land. 2 what is coast of a country is that part of it which is washed by what is sea. 3 In Africa. 4 We admire a beautiful sunset, what is flowers in spring, a clever man. what is Moors said: " How beautiful these things are !" what is wares filled them with admiration. 5 Not all what is best things, but some of each kind. We sometimes ask a merchant to send us a pattern of his wares ; if we like it, wo tell him to send a dozen. 6 what is king and what is queen (his wife) live in a beautiful palace. 7 Our food is placed on dishes in what is kitchen, and then brought into what is dining-room. 8 Or: taking what they pleased. s Or : was surprised. 10 Or : whether. 11 Nearly, not quite. We say : it is almost seven, when it will soon be seven. I have almost finished my work : it will be finished in a few minutes. 12 Or : a good idea. 13 Or : on what is ship. 14 Or: rejoiced greatly, was delighted. 15 Or : it seemed too good to be true. 16 Such as diamonds, emeralds, rubies. 17 I shall give you gold, if you give me what is cat. 18 Or : who knew how to sell things at a good price. 19 Or : I very much want. 20 Or : show themselves. 21 To place her hand on what is cat. 22 Passed his hand over the cat's back. A father sometimes strokes what is head of his little child. 23 When a cat is contented, she makes a noise which is called purring. Y4 All what is wares on board what is ship ; all that Mr Fitzwarren had put in what is ship. 25 Or: said Good-bye. 26A journey across what is sea. 27 Or: went. 28 Or : take care, do not forget. 29 Or : laughing at him: opp. to treat seriously. 30 Or: with all my heart. 310r : in exchange for her, or : in place of her, instead of her. 32 Or: wealth, money. 33 Feel joy. We enjoy a thing when it gives us joy. I enjoy a walk in what is woods : it gives me pleasure to walk through what is woods. See V1II. 19. '34 Or : make good use of it. 3s Or: take as a present. 36 Or : had too kind a heart. 37 Or: marriage. 38 They chose a day for what is wedding. 39 Grand, wonderful, very fine; s, splendour. 40 He was King of England from 1413 to 1422. 41 He was made a knight. 42 Cut. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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