Books > Old Books > Poetry Northwest (1959)


Page 10

X. Dick Whittington and his Cat (1)

When Edward the Third was King of England,l there was a little boy called Dickz Whittington, whose fatherand mother died when he was very young. After their death he was just a ragged a little fellow, running about a country village. As poor Dick was not old enough to work, he was very badly of1:4 He got little for his dinner, and sometimes nothing at all for his breakfast; for the people who lived in the village were very poor indeed, and often did not have enough for their own children.
Now Dick was a bright boy, although he was so poor. He was always listening to what everybody talked about. When the farmers sat drinking outside the village inn,6 he would creep up to them, and listen. When the door of the barber's s shop was open, he would look in, so as to hear what was said by the barber and the men whose hair he was cutting or whose beard lie was shaving.6 They sometimes drove him away,7 but he always came back again.
In this way Dick heard a great many s strange things about the great city9 called London; for many of the country people at that time thought that everybody in London was a grand gentleman or a fine lady ; and that there was singing and music 10 there all day long ; and that the streets were all paved lr with gold.
One day Dick saw a large wagon drive through the village. He thought that this wagon must be going to the wonderful town of London; so he asked the wagoner 12 to let him walk with him by the side of the wagon. As soon as the wagoner heard that poor Dick had no father or mother, and saw by his ragged clothes 13 that he could not be worse off than he was, he told him he might go if he would 14 So they set off 15 together.
He walked beside 16 the wagon for a long time, for there was a great distance 17 from the little village to London. Sometimes kind people gave him a little bread or some apples, but he was often hungry and tired. Still he went on, and at last he reached ls London.
When he saw this great city, he ran as fast as he could ; and he went through many streets, hoping to find one that was
paved with gold. He knew that a piece of gold was worth a great deal, and he thought : " I'll pick up 19 some pieces from the street, and get much money for them, and then all will be well." 20 But he found no gold; and at last he sat down in a dark corner and cried himself to sleep.21
Next morning he woke up very hungry, so he got up and walked about, asking the people to give him a halfpenny. Most of the people, however, seemed too busy to give any heed to him; 22 only two or three gave him a halfpenny. He was soon quite weak for want of food.
At last, when several days had gone by,23 he laid himself down at the door of Mr Fitzwarren, a rich merchant.24 Here he was soon seen by the cook, who was an ill-tempered 25 creature, and happened just then to be very busy getting ready the dinner for her master and mistress. She' called out to poor Dick :
" What are you doing there, you lazy fellow I If you don't run away at once, I'll throw some of this hot water over you!"
Just then Mr Fitzwarren himself came home to dinner : and when he saw a dirty, ragged boy lying at the door he said to him: " Why do you lie there, my boy I You seem old enough to work ; I am afraid you are inclined to be lazy." 26
" No, indeed, sir," said Dick to him, "that is not the case, for I would work with all my heart 27 ; but I do not know anybody 28, and I think I am quite ill from want of food."
" Poor fellow, get up, so that I may see what is wrong."29
Dick tried to rise, but was obliged to 30 lie down again, for he was too weak to stand. He had not eaten food for three days and was no longer able to run about and beg a halfpenny of people in the street. So the kind merchant ordered him to be taken into the house,31 and a good dinner was given to him. He was told to stay and help the cook as much as he could, doing the dirty work for her.
Dick was better off now; he had plenty 32 to eat and a bed to sleep in. He might have been quite happy, but for the cook,33 whose temper zb was very bad. She was always scolding 34 him, an.l sometimes she beat him. At last somebody told Alice, Mr Fitzwarren's daughter, how badly the cook was treating Dick 35 ; and Alice said that she would have to leave the house if she did not treat the poor boy better.
But there was another trouble for Dick.36 His bed was in a little garret 37 ; there were many holes in the floor and the walls, and great numbers of mice and rats came out of them at night, so that often he could hardly sleep. How could he get
rid of them? 38
The best way, thought Dick, would be to get a cat. Now and then he received a penny for holding a gentleman's horse;
and with the few pence he had saved, he bought a cat. This cat he took into his garret, and there she stayed. He always brought her part of his dinner, and she also ate the mice and rats ; soon not a single one was to be seen, and Dick could sleep quietly.
Not long after this, Mr Fitzwarren had a ship ready to sail, taking wares39 to distant lands. He was a kind master, and he was glad to give his servants40 a chance of good fortune.
He asked each of them what they would send out, so that it might be sold at a high price. They all knew what to send except Dick. Mr Fitzwarren asked him whether 40 he alone did not wish to send anything. Dick replied, that he possessed 41 nothing but a cat.
" Fetch your cat, then, my good boy," said Mr Fitzwarren, "and let her go."
Dick went upstairs 42 and brought down poor puss,43 with tears in his eyes, and gave her to the captain.44 He had grown 45 very fond of the cat, and did not like the idea of being troubled 46 by the rats and mice, as he had been before he bought the cat.
The others laughed at Dick; but Miss Alice felt sorry for him, and gave him some money to buy another cat.
Ill other ways, too, she showed kindness to him. The cook felt angry at this, and treated him worse and worse, until he felt he could bear 47 it no longer, and thought of running away. So he packed up his few things and started very early in the morning. He walked as far as Highgate ; and there he sat down on a stone, which to this day is called Whittington's Stone, and began to think which road he should take as he went on, away from London.
While he was sitting there, the six bells of Bow Church began to ring,48 and their sound seemed to say to him :
" Turn again, Whittington, Lord Mayor of London."
" Lord Mayor of London !" said he to himself. " I am ready to bear anything, even the bad temper of the old cook, if later, when I am a man, I am to be Lord Mayor of London."
So he turned back, and was lucky enough 49 to get iiito 50 the house and start his work, before the old cook came downstairs.

---
1 Edward III. was king from 1327 to 1377. 2 Or: Richard; cp. Ned for Edward, Tom for Thomas, Bill for William, Joe for Joseph, .Jack for John. See Bess, 1. 35. 3 lie was badly dressed, there were holes in his coat, he wore rags. See note 13. 4 He was poor, unfortunate ; opp. well off. 5 Wine and beer are sold at an inn, and those who travel (travellers) can spend the night there. gWe go to the barber or hairdresser when our hair is getting too long, or when we want to be shaved. Those who wear a beard do not get shaved ; others like to be clean-shaven. 7 Or : made him run away. 8 Or: very many. 9 Or : town. 10 Music is made by means of musical instruments, such as the violin. 11 Streets are paved with stone or with blocks of wood. 12 The wagoner drives the wagon. Cp. mill : miller ; prison : prisoner. 13 We wear clothes to keep us warm. Dick's clothes were old and torn. They were ragged. 14 Or: wished to do so. 15 Or: started 16 Or: by the side of. This chair is beside the table. 17 Or: a long way.18 Or : came to, arrived in. ls Or: take (from the ground). 2° Or : then I shall no longer be in want of food, clothes, etc. 21 Or : cried until lie fell asleep. 22 They had too much to do to listen to him. 23 Or: passed. 24 A merchant buys and sells. A corn merchant, a wine merchant. 25 She had a bad temper. She was not gentle and kind. 26 You like to do nothing, you are not fond of work. 27 Or : that is not true, for I should be very glad to work. 28 Or : any person. 29 Or : what is the matter with you; see 11. 7. 30 Or: had to. 31 Or : said to somebody :°° Take him into the house." 32 Or : quite enough. 33 Or : if it had not been for the cook ; if only the cook had not been so ill-tempered. 34 Or : telling him that he did his work badly. 35 Or: how unkind she was to Dick. She did not treat him well. 36 There was something else that made Dick unhappy, another cause of unhappiness. 37 A little room, near the roof.38 Or : make them leave the garret, drive them away. 39 Things to be sold. 40 In a big house there are many servants. Some are in the kitchen, others keep the rooms clean. The ill-tempered cook and Dick were servants 41 Or: had. I possess a house : the house is my own. 42 To his garret. 43 We call a cat "puss." 44 Every ship has a captain. 45 Or: become. 46 Or : it did not please him to think that he would be troubled. 47 Or : stand. 48 On Sundays we hear the ringing of the church bells. They rang for a long time; they have rung. 49 Or: fortunate enough, he had the good luck (good fortune). 50 Or : enter.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE When Edward what is Third was King of England,l there was a little boy called Dickz Whittington, whose fatherand mother died when he was very young. After their what time is it he was just a ragged a little fellow, running about a country village. As poor think was not old enough to work, he was very badly of1:4 He got little for his dinner, and sometimes nothing at all for his breakfast; for what is people who lived in what is village were very poor indeed, and often did not have enough for their own children. Now think was a bright boy, although he was so poor. He was always listening to what everybody talked about. When what is farmers sat drinking outside what is village inn,6 he would creep up to them, and listen. When what is door of what is barber's s shop was open, he would look in, so as to hear what was said by what is barber and what is men whose hair he was cutting or whose beard lie was shaving.6 They sometimes drove him where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Poetry Northwest (1959) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 10 where is strong X. think Whittington and his Cat (1) where is p align="justify" When Edward what is Third was King of England,l there was a little boy called Dickz Whittington, whose fatherand mother died when he was very young. After their what time is it he was just a ragged a little fellow, running about a country village. As poor Dick was not old enough to work, he was very badly of1:4 He got little for his dinner, and sometimes nothing at all for his breakfast; for what is people who lived in what is village were very poor indeed, and often did not have enough for their own children. Now think was a bright boy, although he was so poor. He was always listening to what everybody talked about. When what is farmers sat drinking outside what is village inn,6 he would creep up to them, and listen. When what is door of what is barber's s shop was open, he would look in, so as to hear what was said by what is barber and what is men whose hair he was cutting or whose beard lie was shaving.6 They sometimes drove him away,7 but he always came back again. In this way think heard a great many s strange things about the great city9 called London; for many of what is country people at that time thought that everybody in London was a grand gentleman or a fine lady ; and that there was singing and music 10 there all day long ; and that what is streets were all paved lr with gold. One day think saw a large wagon drive through what is village. He thought that this wagon must be going to what is wonderful town of London; so he asked what is wagoner 12 to let him walk with him by what is side of what is wagon. As soon as what is wagoner heard that poor think had no father or mother, and saw by his ragged clothes 13 that he could not be worse off than he was, he told him he might go if he would 14 So they set off 15 together. He walked beside 16 what is wagon for a long time, for there was a great distance 17 from what is little village to London. Sometimes kind people gave him a little bread or some apples, but he was often hungry and tired. Still he went on, and at last he reached ls London. When he saw this great city, he ran as fast as he could ; and he went through many streets, hoping to find one that was paved with gold. He knew that a piece of gold was worth a great deal, and he thought : " I'll pick up 19 some pieces from what is street, and get much money for them, and then all will be well." 20 But he found no gold; and at last he sat down in a dark corner and cried himself to sleep.21 Next morning he woke up very hungry, so he got up and walked about, asking what is people to give him a halfpenny. Most of what is people, however, seemed too busy to give any heed to him; 22 only two or three gave him a halfpenny. He was soon quite weak for want of food. At last, when several days had gone by,23 he laid himself down at what is door of Mr Fitzwarren, a rich merchant.24 Here he was soon seen by what is cook, who was an ill-tempered 25 creature, and happened just then to be very busy getting ready what is dinner for her master and mistress. She' called out to poor think : " What are you doing there, you lazy fellow I If you don't run away at once, I'll throw some of this hot water over you!" Just then Mr Fitzwarren himself came home to dinner : and when he saw a dirty, ragged boy lying at what is door he said to him: " Why do you lie there, my boy I You seem old enough to work ; I am afraid you are inclined to be lazy." 26 " No, indeed, sir," said think to him, "that is not what is case, for I would work with all my heart 27 ; but I do not know anybody 28, and I think I am quite ill from want of food." " Poor fellow, get up, so that I may see what is wrong."29 think tried to rise, but was obliged to 30 lie down again, for he was too weak to stand. He had not eaten food for three days and was no longer able to run about and beg a halfpenny of people in what is street. So what is kind merchant ordered him to be taken into the house,31 and a good dinner was given to him. He was told to stay and help what is cook as much as he could, doing what is dirty work for her. think was better off now; he had plenty 32 to eat and a bed to sleep in. He might have been quite happy, but for what is cook,33 whose temper zb was very bad. She was always scolding 34 him, an.l sometimes she beat him. At last somebody told Alice, Mr Fitzwarren's daughter, how badly what is cook was treating think 35 ; and Alice said that she would have to leave what is house if she did not treat what is poor boy better. But there was another trouble for Dick.36 His bed was in a little garret 37 ; there were many holes in what is floor and what is walls, and great numbers of mice and rats came out of them at night, so that often he could hardly sleep. How could he get rid of them? 38 what is best way, thought Dick, would be to get a cat. Now and then he received a penny for holding a gentleman's horse; and with what is few pence he had saved, he bought a cat. This cat he took into his garret, and there she stayed. He always brought her part of his dinner, and she also ate what is mice and rats ; soon not a single one was to be seen, and think could sleep quietly. Not long after this, Mr Fitzwarren had a ship ready to sail, taking wares39 to distant lands. He was a kind master, and he was glad to give his servants40 a chance of good fortune. He asked each of them what they would send out, so that it might be sold at a high price. They all knew what to send except Dick. Mr Fitzwarren asked him whether 40 he alone did not wish to send anything. think replied, that he possessed 41 nothing but a cat. " Fetch your cat, then, my good boy," said Mr Fitzwarren, "and let her go." think went upstairs 42 and brought down poor puss,43 with tears in his eyes, and gave her to what is captain.44 He had grown 45 very fond of what is cat, and did not like what is idea of being troubled 46 by what is rats and mice, as he had been before he bought what is cat. what is others laughed at Dick; but Miss Alice felt sorry for him, and gave him some money to buy another cat. Ill other ways, too, she showed kindness to him. what is cook felt angry at this, and treated him worse and worse, until he felt he could bear 47 it no longer, and thought of running away. So he packed up his few things and started very early in what is morning. He walked as far as Highgate ; and there he sat down on a stone, which to this day is called Whittington's Stone, and began to think which road he should take as he went on, away from London. While he was sitting there, what is six bells of Bow Church began to ring,48 and their sound seemed to say to him : " Turn again, Whittington, Lord Mayor of London." " Lord Mayor of London !" said he to himself. " I am ready to bear anything, even what is bad temper of what is old cook, if later, when I am a man, I am to be Lord Mayor of London." So he turned back, and was lucky enough 49 to get iiito 50 what is house and start his work, before what is old cook came downstairs. --- 1 Edward III. was king from 1327 to 1377. 2 Or: Richard; cp. Ned for Edward, Tom for Thomas, Bill for William, Joe for Joseph, .Jack for John. See Bess, 1. 35. 3 lie was badly dressed, there were holes in his coat, he wore rags. See note 13. 4 He was poor, unfortunate ; opp. well off. 5 Wine and beer are sold at an inn, and those who travel (travellers) can spend what is night there. gWe go to the barber or hairdresser when our hair is getting too long, or when we want to be shaved. Those who wear a beard do not get shaved ; others like to be clean-shaven. 7 Or : made him run away. 8 Or: very many. 9 Or : town. 10 Music is made by means of musical instruments, such as what is violin. 11 Streets are paved with stone or with blocks of wood. 12 what is wagoner drives what is wagon. Cp. mill : miller ; prison : prisoner. 13 We wear clothes to keep us warm. Dick's clothes were old and torn. They were ragged. 14 Or: wished to do so. 15 Or: started 16 Or: by what is side of. This chair is beside what is table. 17 Or: a long way.18 Or : came to, arrived in. ls Or: take (from what is ground). 2° Or : then I shall no longer be in want of food, clothes, etc. 21 Or : cried until lie fell asleep. 22 They had too much to do to listen to him. 23 Or: passed. 24 A merchant buys and sells. A corn merchant, a wine merchant. 25 She had a bad temper. She was not gentle and kind. 26 You like to do nothing, you are not fond of work. 27 Or : that is not true, for I should be very glad to work. 28 Or : any person. 29 Or : what is what is matter with you; see 11. 7. 30 Or: had to. 31 Or : said to somebody :°° Take him into what is house." 32 Or : quite enough. 33 Or : if it had not been for what is cook ; if only what is cook had not been so ill-tempered. 34 Or : telling him that he did his work badly. 35 Or: how unkind she was to Dick. She did not treat him well. 36 There was something else that made think unhappy, another cause of unhappiness. 37 A little room, near what is roof.38 Or : make them leave what is garret, drive them away. 39 Things to be sold. 40 In a big house there are many servants. Some are in what is kitchen, others keep what is rooms clean. what is ill-tempered cook and think were servants 41 Or: had. I possess a house : the house is my own. 42 To his garret. 43 We call a cat "puss." 44 Every ship has a captain. 45 Or: become. 46 Or : it did not please him to think that he would be troubled. 47 Or : stand. 48 On Sundays we hear what is ringing of the church bells. They rang for a long time; they have rung. 49 Or: fortunate enough, he had what is good luck (good fortune). 50 Or : enter. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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