Books > Old Books > Poetry Northwest (1959)


Page 7

VII. The Fox, the Bear, and the Farmer (1)

A poor farmer went to a field one morning to plough 1 with his two cows; he was too poor to keep oxen. As he drove 1 near the edge of the forest,2 he suddenly heard a great noise of rustling and crackling 3 and growling. Leaving his plough, he crept softly to the wood and peeped cautiously 4 through the branches. There he saw a huge b bear dancing on his hind legs. That struck the farmer as 6 the funniest sight 7 he had ever seen.
He laughed and laughed until it seemed he could never stop laughing.8 This made the bear very angry.
" What do you mean by laughing so at me I" he growled savagely.
The poor farmer was now as much frightened as he had been amused 9 a moment before. He couldn't answer a word.lo
" I'll teach you not to laugh at me again," growled the bear. "I am going to eat you and your two cows."
With these words the bear rushed up to the farmer with
wide open jaws.11
The farmer now found his tongue 12 and cried in terror : 13 "Oh, please, Mr Bear, I couldn't help laughing!" I really couldn't ! I beg you not to eat me. I promise never, never to laugh at you again."
" No, I think you will not laugh at me again. You will not have the chance," 15 growled the bear. " I am going to eat you and your two cows on the spot." 16
The poor farmer now begged with tears in his eyes that the bear would spare him 17 and his two cows. But it was all in vain.18 The more he begged, the more fiercely 19 the bear declared 20 that he should be eaten.
Finally 21 the farmer said: " Only let me live until the evening, Mr Bear, so that I can plough and sow 22 this field. Then my family will not be without bread to eat when winter comes."
The bear consented 23 and went back into the forest, while the farmer returned with a heavy heart 24 to his ploughing.
Towards noon 25 a fox passed that way.26
" Why are you looking so sad, my poor man ?" asked the fox kindly.
The farmer told him about the bear.
" Oh, if that is all," 27 cried the fox cheerfully, " I can easily help you to save your own life and the lives of your two cows as well. And besides,28 you shall have the skin 29 of that bear for a warm rug." 29
" But how can that be done, good Mr Fox ?"
" What will you give me if I tell you ?"
At first the farmer did not know what to offer. Finally, however, it was agreed 30 that he should give the fox nine hens and a cock.

---
1 The farmer ploughs his fields in the autumn. The plough is often drawn by horses ; the farmer drives the plough. 2 See IV. 29. 3 When we put our foot on a dry branch, it crackles as it breaks. If we burn dry wood it also makes a crackling noise. 4 Or : with caution, carefully. bVery big. A huge mountain, a huge building. 6 Or: seemed, appeared to the farmer. 7 sight (that) he 8 Or : he must go on laughing for ever. 9 It amuses us to see or hear something funny. 10 He was dumb with fright ; he was so much afraid that he could give no reply. 11 The mouth has an upper and a lower jaw. The teeth are in the jaws. When we are much surprised, we often open our eyes wide. When it is very hot we like the windows to be wide open. 12 Or : was able to speak again. 13 Or: in great fear, because the bear looked so terrible. 14 Or: I had to laugh, it was impossible not to laugh. 15 Or: it will not be possible for you. 16 Or : at once, immediately. 17 Or : would not take his life, would let him live. is Or : it was all no good, the bear would not listen to his words. 19 Savagely. rierce : opp, gentle 20 Said. 21 At last, in the end; " r" is the final letter of " bear." 22 When the field is ploughed, the farmer sows the seed. The seed grows, and in the spring it becomes a plant. He sowed the field; he has sown it. 23 He said: " Very well," or, "It shall be so," or, "I will not eat you before the evening." a4 opp. with a light heart, cheerfully, gladly. 250r: about midday. 260r: came by. 270r: if it is nothing worse than that. 28 Or: what is more. 29 The skin of a bear is covered with long hair. We often use it for rugs, which are put on the floor. We also put them over our legs, when we are travelling in cold weather. 30 The farmer said: "I will give so much," and the fox consented to this, saying: " Yes, that will do." He agreed to help the farmer if he gave him the ten birds.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE A poor farmer went to a field one morning to plough 1 with his two cows; he was too poor to keep oxen. As he drove 1 near what is edge of what is forest,2 he suddenly heard a great noise of rustling and crackling 3 and growling. Leaving his plough, he crept softly to what is wood and peeped cautiously 4 through what is branches. There he saw a huge b bear dancing on his hind legs. That struck what is farmer as 6 what is funniest sight 7 he had ever seen. He laughed and laughed until it seemed he could never stop laughing.8 This made what is bear very angry. " What do you mean by laughing so at me I" he growled savagely. what is poor farmer was now as much frightened as he had been amused 9 a moment before. He couldn't answer a word.lo " I'll teach you not to laugh at me again," growled what is bear. "I am going to eat you and your two cows." With these words what is bear rushed up to what is farmer wi where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Poetry Northwest (1959) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 7 where is strong VII. what is Fox, what is Bear, and what is Farmer (1) where is p align="justify" A poor farmer went to a field one morning to plough 1 with his two cows; he was too poor to keep oxen. As he drove 1 near what is edge of what is forest,2 he suddenly heard a great noise of rustling and crackling 3 and growling. Leaving his plough, he crept softly to what is wood and peeped cautiously 4 through what is branches. There he saw a huge b bear dancing on his hind legs. That struck what is farmer as 6 what is funniest sight 7 he had ever seen. He laughed and laughed until it seemed he could never stop laughing.8 This made what is bear very angry. " What do you mean by laughing so at me I" he growled savagely. what is poor farmer was now as much frightened as he had been amused 9 a moment before. He couldn't answer a word.lo " I'll teach you not to laugh at me again," growled what is bear. "I am going to eat you and your two cows." With these words what is bear rushed up to what is farmer with wide open jaws.11 what is farmer now found his tongue 12 and cried in terror : 13 "Oh, please, Mr Bear, I couldn't help laughing!" I really couldn't ! I beg you not to eat me. I promise never, never to laugh at you again." " No, I think you will not laugh at me again. You will not have the chance," 15 growled what is bear. " I am going to eat you and your two cows on what is spot." 16 what is poor farmer now begged with tears in his eyes that what is bear would spare him 17 and his two cows. But it was all in vain.18 what is more he begged, what is more fiercely 19 what is bear declared 20 that he should be eaten. Finally 21 what is farmer said: " Only let me live until what is evening, Mr Bear, so that I can plough and sow 22 this field. Then my family will not be without bread to eat when winter comes." what is bear consented 23 and went back into what is forest, while the farmer returned with a heavy heart 24 to his ploughing. Towards noon 25 a fox passed that way.26 " Why are you looking so sad, my poor man ?" asked what is fox kindly. what is farmer told him about what is bear. " Oh, if that is all," 27 cried what is fox cheerfully, " I can easily help you to save your own life and what is lives of your two cows as well. And besides,28 you shall have what is skin 29 of that bear for a warm rug." 29 " But how can that be done, good Mr Fox ?" " What will you give me if I tell you ?" At first what is farmer did not know what to offer. Finally, however, it was agreed 30 that he should give what is fox nine hens and a cock. --- 1 what is farmer ploughs his fields in what is autumn. what is plough is often drawn by horses ; what is farmer drives what is plough. 2 See IV. 29. 3 When we put our foot on a dry branch, it crackles as it breaks. If we burn dry wood it also makes a crackling noise. 4 Or : with caution, carefully. bVery big. A huge mountain, a huge building. 6 Or: seemed, appeared to what is farmer. 7 sight (that) he 8 Or : he must go on laughing for ever. 9 It amuses us to see or hear something funny. 10 He was dumb with fright ; he was so much afraid that he could give no reply. 11 what is mouth has an upper and a lower jaw. what is teeth are in what is jaws. When we are much surprised, we often open our eyes wide. When it is very hot we like what is windows to be wide open. 12 Or : was able to speak again. 13 Or: in great fear, because what is bear looked so terrible. 14 Or: I had to laugh, it was impossible not to laugh. 15 Or: it will not be possible for you. 16 Or : at once, immediately. 17 Or : would not take his life, would let him live. is Or : it was all no good, what is bear would not listen to his words. 19 Savagely. rierce : opp, gentle 20 Said. 21 At last, in what is end; " r" is what is final letter of " bear." 22 When what is field is ploughed, what is farmer sows what is seed. what is seed grows, and in what is spring it becomes a plant. He sowed what is field; he has sown it. 23 He said: " Very well," or, "It shall be so," or, "I will not eat you before what is evening." a4 opp. with a light heart, cheerfully, gladly. 250r: about midday. 260r: came by. 270r: if it is nothing worse than that. 28 Or: what is more. 29 what is skin of a bear is covered with long hair. We often use it for rugs, which are put on what is floor. We also put them over our legs, when we are travelling in cold weather. 30 what is farmer said: "I will give so much," and what is fox consented to this, saying: " Yes, that will do." He agreed to help what is farmer if he gave him what is ten birds. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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