Books > Old Books > Poetry Northwest (1959)


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I. The Cricket's School

THERE was once a fat old cricket,1 who thought a good deal of himself.2 He had such a big, shining body; and a way of chirping1 so loudly,3 that no one could ever forget 4 where he lived.
He was a very good sort of cricket, and was always ready b to say pleasant things to everybody. Yet, sad to relate,6 he had a very bad habit of boasting.7 He liked to talk8 about the wonderful things that he had seen and done, when he was quite young and lived near the white farm-house.
When he was telling these stories, the big crickets, who heard him, seldom 9 said a word. They mostly 10 just sat and looked at one another. The little crickets loved to hear him talk,11 and they would often come12 to the door of his housewhich was a hole in the ground-and ask him to tell them more.
One evening he said that he would teach 13 them a few things, which all crickets should know.14 He then told them to stand in a row,15 and this is what he said :
" With what part of your bodies do you run and leap ?" 16
" With our legs," they cried.
" Do you do anything else with your legs? " he asked.
" We clean ourselves with them," said one.
" We use them and our mouths to make houses in the ground,"
said another.
" Oh yes, and we hear with our two front legs," cried one bright 17 little fellow.
." That is right, replied the fat old cricket. " Most creatures 18 hear with things called ears, that grow on the sides - of 'their 'beads, but I think it 19 much nicer to hear with one's legs, as we do."
" Why, how strange it must be not to hear with one's legs!
cried all the little crrckets together.
" There are a great many queer 20 things to be seen in the great world," said their teacher. 13 "I have seen some big, big creatures with only two legs and no wings whatever." 21
" How dreadful !"22 cried the little crickets. " We do not see how they could move about at all."
" It must be very hard to do so," said the big cricket. "I was very sorry 22 for` tliem." Then he spread 23 out his own wings and stretched his six legs to show how well he was fitted 24 to walk or fly.
" But how can they sing if they have no wings ?" asked the bright little cricket.
" They sing through their mouths, in much the same way as the .birds," 25 he said. "I am sure it must be much easier to sing by rubbing 26 one's wings together, as we do."
" I could tell you many queer things about these twolegged27 creatures," he continued,28 "for I have seen the houses in which they live. Then there are other large, four-footed creatures that are terrible to behold,29 but, my children, I was never afraid of any of them. I am one of the truly 30 brave 31 people, who are never frightened, no matter how terrible the sight.32 I hope, children, that you will always be brave, like me. If anything should scare you,33 do not jump or run away. Stay just where you are, and-"
But the little crickets never heard the rest of what their teacher had to say, for at that moment 34 Brown Bess,3b the cow, came through the broken fence towards the spot where the crickets were gathered together.36
The teacher gave one "chirp," and hurried 37 down his hole as fast as he could. The little crickets tumbled 38 over one another in their hurry 37 to get away. The fat old cricket, who had been out in the great world, never again talked to them about being brave.

---
1 A little insect, often heard in the cornfields in summertime. We say : the crickets are chirping, when they make their noise. 2 Or: hal a very great opinion of himself. What is your opinion of him ? (What do you think of him ?) 3 Adverb to : loud ; s. loudness; opp. softly, quietly. 4 a, forgetful. He never remembers where he has put his books ; he is a very forgetful boy. Forgetfulness is a very bad habit. 5 Or : willing. 6 Or : tell. Sad to relate : It makes one sad to talk . about it. 7 When a man often tells us how wonderfully strong or wise he is, we call him boastful. It is better to be modest than to boast. 8 He was fond of talking. 9 Or: rarely, hardly ever; opp. often. 10 At most times, usually, generally. li Or: listened to him with the greatest pleasure, found his words most interesting. 1z Would come : used to come. 13 You go to school to learn, and your teacher teaches you. He taught me, he has taught me. 14 Or : ought to know. 15 In a row : one next to the other. The houses of a street are in a row. Trees are often planted in rows.
18 Crickets can leap (or jump) very high. 17 Or : clever, intelligent ; opp. stupid, silly ; s. brightness. 18 Or : animals, living beings. 19 Or : it seems to me, in my opinion it is. 20 Or: strange, unusual, odd. 21 Or : no wings at all, no wings of any kind. 22 Or : sad. It fills them with sorrow to think of these poor creatures, they are sorry for them. 23 A bird or insect spreads its wings when it flies, and folds them together when it is not flying. 24 He had all that was wanted for walking or flying. 250r : in a way that is very much like that of the birds. 26 When it is cold, we rub our hands together to make them warm. Past : rubbed. 27 Having two legs. 28 Or : went on. He said some more. 29 Or : see, look at. Past : I beheld. 80 a. true; really. 31 A boy who is not easily frightened is brave. The man who fights for his country is brave. s. bravery. 32 Even if what they see is very terrible. 33 Or : seem terrible to you. 34 Or: just then. 35 Bess, short for Elizabeth. 36 Where they had come together, where they were all together. 37 When we have little time to do a thing, we are in a hurry. When we are late in leaving home, we hurry to school. 38 Or : fell.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE THERE was once a fat old cricket,1 who thought a good deal of himself.2 He had such a big, shining body; and a way of chirping1 so loudly,3 that no one could ever forget 4 where he lived. He was a very good sort of cricket, and was always ready b to say pleasant things to everybody. Yet, sad to relate,6 he had a very bad habit of boasting.7 He liked to talk8 about what is wonderful things that he had seen and done, when he was quite young and lived near what is white farm-house. When he was telling these stories, what is big crickets, who heard him, seldom 9 said a word. They mostly 10 just sat and looked at one another. what is little crickets loved to hear him talk,11 and they would often come12 to what is door of his housewhich was a hole in what is ground-and ask him to tell them more. One evening he said that he would teach 13 them a few things, which all crickets should know.14 He then told them to stand where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Poetry Northwest (1959) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 1 where is strong I. what is Cricket's School where is p align="justify" THERE was once a fat old cricket,1 who thought a good deal of himself.2 He had such a big, shining body; and a way of chirping1 so loudly,3 that no one could ever forget 4 where he lived. He was a very good sort of cricket, and was always ready b to say pleasant things to everybody. Yet, sad to relate,6 he had a very bad habit of boasting.7 He liked to talk8 about what is wonderful things that he had seen and done, when he was quite young and lived near what is white farm-house. When he was telling these stories, what is big crickets, who heard him, seldom 9 said a word. They mostly 10 just sat and looked at one another. what is little crickets loved to hear him talk,11 and they would often come12 to what is door of his housewhich was a hole in what is ground-and ask him to tell them more. One evening he said that he would teach 13 them a few things, which all crickets should know.14 He then told them to stand in a row,15 and this is what he said : " With what part of your bodies do you run and leap ?" 16 " With our legs," they cried. " Do you do anything else with your legs? " he asked. " We clean ourselves with them," said one. " We use them and our mouths to make houses in what is ground," said another. " Oh yes, and we hear with our two front legs," cried one bright 17 little fellow. ." That is right, replied what is fat old cricket. " Most creatures 18 hear with things called ears, that grow on what is sides - of 'their 'beads, but I think it 19 much nicer to hear with one's legs, as we do." " Why, how strange it must be not to hear with one's legs! cried all what is little crrckets together. " There are a great many queer 20 things to be seen in what is great world," said their teacher. 13 "I have seen some big, big creatures with only two legs and no wings whatever." 21 " How dreadful !"22 cried what is little crickets. " We do not see how they could move about at all." " It must be very hard to do so," said what is big cricket. "I was very sorry 22 for` tliem." Then he spread 23 out his own wings and stretched his six legs to show how well he was fitted 24 to walk or fly. " But how can they sing if they have no wings ?" asked what is bright little cricket. " They sing through their mouths, in much what is same way as what is .birds," 25 he said. "I am sure it must be much easier to sing by rubbing 26 one's wings together, as we do." " I could tell you many queer things about these twolegged27 creatures," he continued,28 "for I have seen what is houses in which they live. Then there are other large, four-footed creatures that are terrible to behold,29 but, my children, I was never afraid of any of them. I am one of what is truly 30 brave 31 people, who are never frightened, no matter how terrible what is sight.32 I hope, children, that you will always be brave, like me. If anything should scare you,33 do not jump or run away. Stay just where you are, and-" But what is little crickets never heard what is rest of what their teacher had to say, for at that moment 34 Brown Bess,3b what is cow, came through what is broken fence towards what is spot where what is crickets were gathered together.36 what is teacher gave one "chirp," and hurried 37 down his hole as fast as he could. what is little crickets tumbled 38 over one another in their hurry 37 to get away. what is fat old cricket, who had been out in what is great world, never again talked to them about being brave. --- 1 A little insect, often heard in what is cornfields in summertime. We say : what is crickets are chirping, when they make their noise. 2 Or: hal a very great opinion of himself. What is your opinion of him ? (What do you think of him ?) 3 Adverb to : loud ; s. loudness; opp. softly, quietly. 4 a, forgetful. He never remembers where he has put his books ; he is a very forgetful boy. Forgetfulness is a very bad habit. 5 Or : willing. 6 Or : tell. Sad to relate : It makes one sad to talk . about it. 7 When a man often tells us how wonderfully strong or wise he is, we call him boastful. It is better to be modest than to boast. 8 He was fond of talking. 9 Or: rarely, hardly ever; opp. often. 10 At most times, usually, generally. li Or: listened to him with what is greatest pleasure, found his words most interesting. 1z Would come : used to come. 13 You go to school to learn, and your teacher teaches you. He taught me, he has taught me. 14 Or : ought to know. 15 In a row : one next to what is other. what is houses of a street are in a row. Trees are often planted in rows. 18 Crickets can leap (or jump) very high. 17 Or : clever, intelligent ; opp. stupid, silly ; s. brightness. 18 Or : animals, living beings. 19 Or : it seems to me, in my opinion it is. 20 Or: strange, unusual, odd. 21 Or : no wings at all, no wings of any kind. 22 Or : sad. It fills them with sorrow to think of these poor creatures, they are sorry for them. 23 A bird or insect spreads its wings when it flies, and folds them together when it is not flying. 24 He had all that was wanted for walking or flying. 250r : in a way that is very much like that of what is birds. 26 When it is cold, we rub our hands together to make them warm. Past : rubbed. 27 Having two legs. 28 Or : went on. He said some more. 29 Or : see, look at. Past : I beheld. 80 a. true; really. 31 A boy who is not easily frightened is brave. what is man who fights for his country is brave. s. bravery. 32 Even if what they see is very terrible. 33 Or : seem terrible to you. 34 Or: just then. 35 Bess, short for Elizabeth. 36 Where they had come together, where they were all together. 37 When we have little time to do a thing, we are in a hurry. When we are late in leaving home, we hurry to school. 38 Or : fell. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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