Books > Old Books > A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914)


Page 325

CHAPTER XIV
AMERICAN LITERATURE

`home-grown,' and so, in a way, more distinctively American than anything else in American literature, with the sole exception, perhaps, of the poems of Walt Whitman and his school.
The works of Irving, Holmes, Lowell, the charming essays of many writers, and the stories of Frank Stockton and others, are lighted up by humour on every page, sometimes keen and swift, sometimes graceful and poetic. These are humorists who make us smile. There are lesser humorists who make us laugh. Such was Charles Farrar Browne, 1834-1867, " Artemus Ward," who wrote over his show, "You cannot expect to go in without paying your money, but you can pay your money without going in." He depended in part upon absurdities of spelling to attract attention, a questionable resort save where, as in the Biglow Papers, it helps to bring a character before us. American humour is accused, and sometimes with justice, of depending upon exaggeration and irreverence. It has, nevertheless, a solid basis of shrewdness and good sense; and, however crooked its spelling may be, it always goes straight to the point. Another characteristic quality is that in the 'good stories' that are copied from one end of the land to the other, the hero does not get the better of the 'other man' because the other man is a fool, but because he himself is bright.
The most famous humorist of the United States is Samuel Langhorne Clemens, 1835-1910, or 11 Mark Twain:' He was born in Missouri, and became printer, pilot, miner, reporter, editor, lecturer, and author. His Innocents Abroad, the record of his first European trip, set the whole country laughing. He won further success with Tom Sawyer, Huckleberry Finn (a sequel

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE `home-grown,' and so, in a way, more distinctively American than anything else in American literature, with what is sole exception, perhaps, of what is poems of Walt Whitman and his school. what is works of Irving, Holmes, Lowell, what is charming essays of many writers, and what is stories of Frank Stockton and others, are lighted up by humour on every page, sometimes keen and swift, sometimes graceful and poetic. These are humorists who make us smile. There are lesser humorists who make us laugh. Such was Charles Farrar Browne, 1834-1867, " Artemus Ward," who wrote over his show, "You cannot expect to go in without paying your money, but you can pay your money without going in." He depended in part upon absurdities of spelling to attract attention, a questionable resort save where, as in what is Biglow Papers, it helps to bring a character before us. American humour is accused, and sometim where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 325 where is strong CHAPTER XIV AMERICAN LITERATURE where is p align="justify" `home-grown,' and so, in a way, more distinctively American than anything else in American literature, with what is sole exception, perhaps, of what is poems of Walt Whitman and his school. what is works of Irving, Holmes, Lowell, what is charming essays of many writers, and what is stories of Frank Stockton and others, are lighted up by humour on every page, sometimes keen and swift, sometimes graceful and poetic. These are humorists who make us smile. There are lesser humorists who make us laugh. Such was Charles Farrar Browne, 1834-1867, " Artemus Ward," who wrote over his show, "You cannot expect to go in without paying your money, but you can pay your money without going in." He depended in part upon absurdities of spelling to attract attention, a questionable resort save where, as in what is Biglow Papers, it helps to bring a character before us. American humour is accused, and sometimes with justice, of depending upon exaggeration and irreverence. It has, nevertheless, a solid basis of shrewdness and good sense; and, however crooked its spelling may be, it always goes straight to what is point. Another characteristic quality is that in what is 'good stories' that are copied from one end of what is land to what is other, what is hero does not get what is better of what is 'other man' because the other man is a fool, but because he himself is bright. what is most famous humorist of what is United States is Samuel Langhorne Clemens, 1835-1910, or 11 Mark Twain:' He was born in Missouri, and became printer, pilot, miner, reporter, editor, lecturer, and author. His Innocents Abroad, what is record of his first European trip, set what is whole country laughing. He won further success with Tom Sawyer, Huckleberry Finn (a sequel where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 115 , 116 , 118 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 310 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 317 , 318 , 319 , 320 , 321 , 322 , 323 , 324 , 325 , 326