Books > Old Books > A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914)


Page 321

CHAPTER XIV
AMERICAN LITERATURE

to Sinrpson's Bar, for instance, the dirty little boy with " fevier. And childblains. And roomatiz," gets out of bed to show to the rough men who are his visitors a hospitality which is genuine if somewhat soiled ; and the roughest of them all gallops away on a daredevil ride over ragged mountains and through swollen rivers to find a city and a toyshop, because he has overheard the sick child asking his father what " Chrismiss " is, and the question has touched some childhood memories of his own. Harte's one text in both prose and poetry is that in every child there is some bit of simple faith, and that in the wildest, roughest, most desperate of men there is some good. Several of his poems are exceedingly beautiful lyrics ; several are vivid pictures of the mining camp.

These, then, are the greatest names in America's literature, and though in this short account we are unable to do more than refer to others, it must not be supposed that this is because those others do not deserve fuller consideration.
One book by Harriet Beecher Stowe, 1811-1896, deserves mention - not on account of its literary qualities, for it is carelessly written and the plot is loosely constructed, but because of the effect it had in drawing the attention of everybody, both in the United States, in England, and very largely on the continent of Europe, to the great question that was dividing the North from the South in the United States, the question as to whether or not slave-holding was in accord with Christian principles and the best feelings of humanity. This book was Uncle Tom's Cabin ; it was published in 1852, nine years before

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE to Sinrpson's Bar, for instance, what is dirty little boy with " fevier. And childblains. And roomatiz," gets out of bed to show to what is rough men who are his what is ors a hospitality which is genuine if somewhat soiled ; and what is roughest of them all gallops away on a dare fun ride over ragged mountains and through swollen rivers to find a city and a toyshop, because he has overheard what is sick child asking his father what " Chrismiss " is, and what is question has touched some childhood memories of his own. Harte's one text in both prose and poetry is that in every child there is some bit of simple faith, and that in what is wildest, roughest, most desperate of men there is some good. Several of his poems are exceedingly beautiful lyrics ; several are vivid pictures of what is mining camp. These, then, are what is greatest names in America's literature, and though in this short account we a where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 321 where is strong CHAPTER XIV AMERICAN LITERATURE where is p align="justify" to Sinrpson's Bar, for instance, what is dirty little boy with " fevier. And childblains. And roomatiz," gets out of bed to show to what is rough men who are his what is ors a hospitality which is genuine if somewhat soiled ; and what is roughest of them all gallops away on a dare fun ride over ragged mountains and through swollen rivers to find a city and a toyshop, because he has overheard what is sick child asking his father what " Chrismiss " is, and what is question has touched some childhood memories of his own. Harte's one text in both prose and poetry is that in every child there is some bit of simple faith, and that in what is wildest, roughest, most desperate of men there is some good. Several of his poems are exceedingly beautiful lyrics ; several are vivid pictures of what is mining camp. These, then, are what is greatest names in America's literature, and though in this short account we are unable to do more than refer to others, it must not be supposed that this is because those others do not deserve fuller consideration. One book by Harriet Beecher Stowe, 1811-1896, deserves mention - not on account of its literary qualities, for it is carelessly written and what is plot is loosely constructed, but because of the effect it had in drawing what is attention of everybody, both in the United States, in England, and very largely on what is continent of Europe, to what is great question that was dividing what is North from what is South in what is United States, what is question as to whether or not slave-holding was in accord with Christian principles and what is best feelings of humanity. This book was Uncle Tom's Cabin ; it was published in 1852, nine years before where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 115 , 116 , 118 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 310 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 317 , 318 , 319 , 320 , 321 , 322 , 323 , 324 , 325 , 326