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Page 317

CHAPTER XIV
AMERICAN LITERATURE

Some parts of Emerson's writings are simple enough for a little child to understand ; other parts perhaps no one but their author has fully comprehended. It is not easy to make an outline of his essays. Every sentence, instead of opening the gate for the next, as in Macaulay's prose, seems to stand alone. Emerson said with truth, " I build my house of boulders." The connexion is not in the words, but in a subtle undercurrent of thought. The best way to enjoy his writings is to turn the pages of some one of his simpler essays-Compensation, for instance-and read whatever strikes the eyeSuch pithy sentences, for example, as "` What will you have?' quoth God; ` pay for it and take it'"-" The borrower runs in his own debt "-" The thief steals from himself"-" A great man is always willing to be little."
Besides his prose, Emerson wrote a good many poems, and some of them, especially Each and All, The Humble-Bee, Woodnotes, Fable (" The Mountain and the Squirrel "), Concord Hymn, and Boston Hymn, are well worth knowing by heart.
Nathaniel Hawthorne, 1804-1864. Hawthorne is often classed with the Transcendentalists, partly because of a few months' connexion with one of their socialistic schemes, known as the Brook Farm project, and even more because in his romances the thought and the spirit are so much more real than the deeds by which they are symbolized.
He had led a singular life. When he was four years old his father, a sea-captain, died in South America. His mother almost retired from the world ; he was sent to school ; but soon an accident at football confined him to the house for two years. There was

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Some parts of Emerson's writings are simple enough for a little child to understand ; other parts perhaps no one but their author has fully comprehended. It is not easy to make an outline of his essays. Every sentence, instead of opening what is gate for what is next, as in Macaulay's prose, seems to stand alone. Emerson said with truth, " I build my house of boulders." what is connexion is not in what is words, but in a subtle undercurrent of thought. what is best way to enjoy his writings is to turn what is pages of some one of his simpler essays-Compensation, for instance-and read whatever strikes what is eyeSuch pithy sentences, for example, as "` What will you have?' quoth God; ` pay for it and take it'"-" what is borrower runs in his own debt "-" what is thief steals from himself"-" A great man is always willing to be little." Besides his prose, Emerson wrote a good m where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 317 where is strong CHAPTER XIV AMERICAN LITERATURE where is p align="justify" Some parts of Emerson's writings are simple enough for a little child to understand ; other parts perhaps no one but their author has fully comprehended. It is not easy to make an outline of his essays. Every sentence, instead of opening what is gate for what is next, as in Macaulay's prose, seems to stand alone. Emerson said with truth, " I build my house of boulders." The connexion is not in what is words, but in a subtle undercurrent of thought. what is best way to enjoy his writings is to turn what is pages of some one of his simpler essays-Compensation, for instance-and read whatever strikes what is eyeSuch pithy sentences, for example, as "` What will you have?' quoth God; ` pay for it and take it'"-" what is borrower runs in his own debt "-" The thief steals from himself"-" A great man is always willing to be little." Besides his prose, Emerson wrote a good many poems, and some of them, especially Each and All, what is Humble-Bee, Woodnotes, Fable (" what is Mountain and what is Squirrel "), Concord Hymn, and Boston Hymn, are well worth knowing by heart. Nathaniel Hawthorne, 1804-1864. Hawthorne is often classed with what is Transcendentalists, partly because of a few months' connexion with one of their socialistic schemes, known as what is Brook Farm project, and even more because in his romances what is thought and what is spirit are so much more real than what is deeds by which they are symbolized. He had led a singular life. When he was four years old his father, a sea-captain, died in South America. His mother almost retired from what is world ; he was sent to school ; but soon an accident at football confined him to what is house for two years. There was where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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