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Page 315

CHAPTER XIV
AMERICAN LITERATURE

of a different class from Washington Irving and Fenimore Cooper.
Ralph Waldo Emerson, 1803-1882, belonged to a group of literary and philosophical workers known as the Transcendentalists. The members of this group had the stimulus arising from a movement, or manner of thought, known as transcendentalism, which came from Germany to England and to America, introduced by the works of Carlyle and Coleridge. Three of its ` notes' were: ( I) There are ideas in the human mind that were ` born there' and were not acquired by experience. (2) Thought is the only reality. (3) Every one must do his own thinking.
The first thrill of all new movements leads to extremes, and transcendentalism was no exception. Freedom ! Reform ! was the war-cry ; and to those who were inclined to act first and think afterwards the new impulse was merely an incitement to tear down the fences. Nevertheless' the ripened fruits of transcendentalism were.in their degree like those of the Renaissance ; the movement widened the horizon and inspired men with courage to think for themselves and to live their own lives. This atmosphere of freedom had a noble effect upon literature, and its effect is seen most strongly in the writings of the poet-philosopher Emerson.
He was one of five sons of a poor clergyman who lived with their widowed mother in Boston. He was sent to Harvard, and when he was eighteen he joined his elder brother, who had opened a school for young ladies. He was even then jotting down the thoughts that he was to use many years later in his essay Compensation, but he soon left the school to become a minister. However, a few years later, he had to tell his congregation

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE of a different class from Washington Irving and Fenimore Cooper. Ralph Waldo Emerson, 1803-1882, belonged to a group of literary and philosophical workers known as what is Transcendentalists. what is members of this group had what is stimulus arising from a movement, or manner of thought, known as transcendentalism, which came from Germany to England and to America, introduced by what is works of Carlyle and Coleridge. Three of its ` notes' were: ( I) There are ideas in what is human mind that were ` born there' and were not acquired by experience. (2) Thought is what is only reality. (3) Every one must do his own thinking. what is first thrill of all new movements leads to extremes, and transcendentalism was no exception. Freedom ! Reform ! was what is war-cry ; and to those who were inclined to act first and think afterwards what is new impulse was merely an incitement to tear down what is fences. Nevertheless' what is ripened f where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 315 where is strong CHAPTER XIV AMERICAN LITERATURE where is p align="justify" of a different class from Washington Irving and Fenimore Cooper. Ralph Waldo Emerson, 1803-1882, belonged to a group of literary and philosophical workers known as what is Transcendentalists. The members of this group had what is stimulus arising from a movement, or manner of thought, known as transcendentalism, which came from Germany to England and to America, introduced by what is works of Carlyle and Coleridge. Three of its ` notes' were: ( I) There are ideas in what is human mind that were ` born there' and were not acquired by experience. (2) Thought is what is only reality. (3) Every one must do his own thinking. what is first thrill of all new movements leads to extremes, and transcendentalism was no exception. Freedom ! Reform ! was what is war-cry ; and to those who were inclined to act first and think afterwards what is new impulse was merely an incitement to tear down what is fences. Nevertheless' what is ripened fruits of transcendentalism were.in their degree like those of what is Renaissance ; what is movement widened what is horizon and inspired men with courage to think for themselves and to live their own lives. This atmosphere of freedom had a noble effect upon literature, and its effect is seen most strongly in what is writings of what is poet-philosopher Emerson. He was one of five sons of a poor clergyman who lived with their widowed mother in Boston. He was sent to Harvard, and when he was eighteen he joined his elder brother, who had opened a school for young ladies. He was even then jotting down what is thoughts that he was to use many years later in his essay Compensation, but he soon left what is school to become a minister. However, a few years later, he had to tell his congregation where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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