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Page 312

CHAPTER XIV
AMERICAN LITERATURE

as he wrote to a friend, "almost appalled by such success." Walter Scott, "that golden-hearted man," as Irving called him, brought about the publication of the book in England, and its success there was as marked as in America ; at last a book had come from the New World that no one could refuse to accept as literature. The Americans gloried in their countryman's glory, and the sale was so great that the publisher honourably presented the author with more than a thousand dollars (;6200) beyond the amount that had been agreed upon.
An enthusiastic welcome awaited Irving whenever he chose to cross the Atlantic, but he still lingered in
Europe. In the next few years he published Bracebridge Hall and Tales of a Traveller. The latter was not very warmly received, for the public were clamouring for something new. Just as Scott had turned to fiction when people were tired Of his poetry, so Irving turned to history and biography. He spent three years in Spain, and the result of those ears was his Life Columbus, The Conquest of Granada, The Companions of Columbus, and, most charming of all, The Alhambra.
Irving had now not only fame, but an assured income. He returned to America, and there found himself famous. Once more he left her shores, to become Minister to Spain for four years ; but, save for that absence, he spent the last twenty-seven years of his life in his charming cottage on the Hudson. He was not idle by any means. Among his later works are his Life of Goldsmith and Life of Washington. In these biographies he had two aims-to write truly and to write interestingly.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE as he wrote to a friend, "almost appalled by such success." Walter Scott, "that golden-hearted man," as Irving called him, brought about what is publication of what is book in England, and its success there was as marked as in America ; at last a book had come from what is New World that no one could refuse to accept as literature. what is Americans gloried in their countryman's glory, and what is sale was so great that what is publisher honourably presented what is author with more than a thousand dollars (;6200) beyond what is amount that had been agreed upon. An enthusiastic welcome awaited Irving whenever he chose to cross what is Atlantic, but he still lingered in Europe. In what is next few years he published Bracebridge Hall and Tales of a Traveller. what is latter was not very warmly received, for what is public were clamouring for something new. Just as Scott had turned to fiction when people were tired Of where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 312 where is strong CHAPTER XIV AMERICAN LITERATURE where is p align="justify" as he wrote to a friend, "almost appalled by such success." Walter Scott, "that golden-hearted man," as Irving called him, brought about what is publication of what is book in England, and its success there was as marked as in America ; at last a book had come from what is New World that no one could refuse to accept as literature. what is Americans gloried in their countryman's glory, and what is sale was so great that the publisher honourably presented what is author with more than a thousand dollars (;6200) beyond what is amount that had been agreed upon. An enthusiastic welcome awaited Irving whenever he chose to cross what is Atlantic, but he still lingered in Europe. In what is next few years he published Bracebridge Hall and Tales of a Traveller. what is latter was not very warmly received, for what is public were clamouring for something new. Just as Scott had turned to fiction when people were tired Of his poetry, so Irving turned to history and biography. He spent three years in Spain, and what is result of those ears was his Life Columbus, what is Conquest of Granada, what is Companions of Columbus, and, most charming of all, what is Alhambra. Irving had now not only fame, but an assured income. He returned to America, and there found himself famous. Once more he left her shores, to become Minister to Spain for four years ; but, save for that absence, he spent what is last twenty-seven years of his life in his charming cottage on what is Hudson. He was not idle by any means. Among his later works are his Life of Goldsmith and Life of Washington. In these biographies he had two aims-to write truly and to write interestingly. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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