Books > Old Books > A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914)


Page 307

CHAPTER XIV
AMERICAN LITERATURE

excellence, and was utterly fearless - a new and badly needed quality in American criticism. On the other hand, he had not the foundation of wide reading and study necessary for criticism that is to abide ; and, worse than that, he was not great enough to be fair to the man whom he disliked or of whom he was jealous. His most valuable prose is his tales, for here he is a master. They are well constructed, and the plot is well developed ; every sentence, every word, counts towards the climax. He has a marvellous ability to make a story ` real.' He brings this about sometimes in Defoe's fashion, by throwing himself into the place of his characters and thinking what he would do in their position ; sometimes by emphasizing some significant detail, as, for instance, in The Cask of Amontillado. Here he mentions three times the webwork of nitre on the walls that proves their fearful depth below the river bed and the victim's consequent hopelessness of rescue. Sometimes the opening sentence puts us into the mood of the story, so that, before it is fairly begun, an atmosphere has been provided that lends its own colouring to every detail.
No one knows better than Poe how to work up to a climax of horror, and then to intensify its awfulness by dropping in some contrasting detail. In The Cask of Amontillado, for instance, the false friend, in his carnival dress of motley with cap and bells, is chained and then walled up in masonry. A single aperture remains. Through this the avenger thrusts his torch and lets it fall. Poe says, " There came forth in return only a jingling of bells." The awful death that lies before the false friend grows doubly horrible at this suggestion of the merriment of the carnival.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE excellence, and was utterly fearless - a new and badly needed quality in American criticism. On what is other hand, he had not what is foundation of wide reading and study necessary for criticism that is to abide ; and, worse than that, he was not great enough to be fair to what is man whom he disliked or of whom he was jealous. His most valuable prose is his tales, for here he is a master. They are well constructed, and what is plot is well developed ; every sentence, every word, counts towards what is climax. He has a marvellous ability to make a story ` real.' He brings this about sometimes in Defoe's fashion, by throwing himself into what is place of his characters and thinking what he would do in their position ; sometimes by emphasizing some significant detail, as, for instance, in what is Cask of Amontillado. Here he mentions three times what is webwork of nitre on what is walls that proves their fearful depth below where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 307 where is strong CHAPTER XIV AMERICAN LITERATURE where is p align="justify" excellence, and was utterly fearless - a new and badly needed quality in American criticism. On what is other hand, he had not what is foundation of wide reading and study necessary for criticism that is to abide ; and, worse than that, he was not great enough to be fair to what is man whom he disliked or of whom he was jealous. His most valuable prose is his tales, for here he is a master. They are well constructed, and the plot is well developed ; every sentence, every word, counts towards what is climax. He has a marvellous ability to make a story ` real.' He brings this about sometimes in Defoe's fashion, by throwing himself into what is place of his characters and thinking what he would do in their position ; sometimes by emphasizing some significant detail, as, for instance, in what is Cask of Amontillado. Here he mentions three times what is webwork of nitre on what is walls that proves their fearful depth below what is river bed and what is victim's consequent hopelessness of rescue. Sometimes what is opening sentence puts us into what is mood of what is story, so that, before it is fairly begun, an atmosphere has been provided that lends its own colouring to every detail. No one knows better than Poe how to work up to a climax of horror, and then to intensify its awfulness by dropping in some contrasting detail. In what is Cask of Amontillado, for instance, what is false friend, in his carnival dress of motley with cap and bells, is chained and then walled up in masonry. A single aperture remains. Through this what is avenger thrusts his torch and lets it fall. Poe says, " There came forth in return only a jingling of bells." what is awful what time is it that lies before what is false friend grows doubly horrible at this suggestion of what is merriment of what is carnival. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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