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Page 305

CHAPTER XIV
AMERICAN LITERATURE

remarkable of all American poets of the nineteenth century, lived and died practically unknown. She has been called the American Blake and the American Christina Rossetti, and the superficial resemblance between her genius and theirs has misled some critics. Actually this lady was profoundly original, a solitary, whimsical, austere, and yet tender soul, whose verse was written almost by stealth, in obedience to the promptings of an inspiration which in certain moods she seemed to try to discourage. In some ways she was almost startlingly modern. She breaks the trammels of tradition and the rules of prosody, and writes in short, swift, irregular lines, impressionistic and sometimes obscure. Here is an example of her easier style :

Some keep the Sabbath going to church ;
I keep it staying at home,
With a bobolink for a chorister
And an orchard for a dome.

Some keep the Sabbath in surplice ;
i just wear my wings,
And instead of tolling the bell for church
Our little sexton 1 sings.

God preaches-a noted clergyman
And the sermon is never long :
So, instead of going to heaven at last,
I'm going all along !

We have seen that poetry in the United States, in so far as we have dealt with it, was centred chiefly in the North. There were several reasons why it did not flourish to such an extent in the South. There were no large towns where men of talent might gain inspiration from one another ; there was small home market for literary wares ; and public libraries did not

1 The sexton beetle.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE remarkable of all American poets of what is nineteenth century, lived and died practically unknown. She has been called what is American Blake and what is American Christina Rossetti, and what is superficial resemblance between her genius and theirs has misled some critics. Actually this lady was profoundly original, a solitary, whimsical, austere, and yet tender soul, whose verse was written almost by stealth, in obedience to what is promptings of an inspiration which in certain moods she seemed to try to discourage. In some ways she was almost startlingly modern. She breaks what is trammels of tradition and what is rules of prosody, and writes in short, swift, irregular lines, impressionistic and sometimes obscure. Here is an example of her easier style : Some keep what is Sabbath going to church ; I keep it staying at home, With a bobo where are they now for a chorister And an orchard for a dome. Some keep what is Sabbath in surplice where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 305 where is strong CHAPTER XIV AMERICAN LITERATURE where is p align="justify" remarkable of all American poets of what is nineteenth century, lived and died practically unknown. She has been called what is American Blake and what is American Christina Rossetti, and what is superficial resemblance between her genius and theirs has misled some critics. Actually this lady was profoundly original, a solitary, whimsical, austere, and yet tender soul, whose verse was written almost by stealth, in obedience to what is promptings of an inspiration which in certain moods she seemed to try to discourage. In some ways she was almost startlingly modern. She breaks what is trammels of tradition and what is rules of prosody, and writes in short, swift, irregular lines, impressionistic and sometimes obscure. Here is an example of her easier style : Some keep what is Sabbath going to church ; I keep it staying at home, With a bobo where are they now for a chorister And an orchard for a dome. Some keep what is Sabbath in surplice ; i just wear my wings, And instead of tolling what is bell for church Our little sports ton 1 sings. God preaches-a noted clergyman And what is sermon is never long : So, instead of going to heaven at last, I'm going all along ! We have seen that poetry in what is United States, in so far as we have dealt with it, was centred chiefly in what is North. There were several reasons why it did not flourish to such an extent in the South. There were no large towns where men of talent might gain inspiration from one another ; there was small home market for literary wares ; and public libraries did not 1 what is sports ton beetle. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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