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Page 285

CHAPTER XIII
THE EARLY TWENTIETH CENTURY

men were liberally endowed with a warm and wide humanity. " G. K. C.," as he came to be called, was quite as typically English as Galsworthy, but in a totally different way. He had in him a touch of Falstaff, a touch of Dr Johnson, even a touch of Friar Tuck. Like Falstaff, he delighted in laughing at his own girth ; like Falstaff, he took an undissembled pleasure in eating, drinking, and conversation. There the resemblance ended, for the mysticism which he shared with Dr Johnson and the simple, genial piety which he shared with Friar Tuck were remote from the ken of Shakespeare's Fat Knight.
Educated at St Paul's School, London, " G. K. C." began his literary career as an art critic, and ended it as almost everything. Prose and verse, travel and biography, detective fiction and romance, satire and philosophy, nothing came amiss to that mind at once ponderous and agile. He felt most at home in the medieval world of his imagination, a world full of glorious colours, merry jests, divine visions, and quaint, credulous folk. This homesickness for a vanished Christendom was probably one of the influences which moved him in 1922 to join the Church of Rome. After that date one is always conscious of the Roman leaven fermenting the Chestertonian bread.
" G. K. C." was the master of the fantastic paradox and of the pithy epigram. An example of the former is his whimsical declaration that Charles II " could not keep the Ten Commandments, but he kept the ten thousand commandments ... he was a gentleman, and a gentleman is a man who obeys strange statutes not to be found in any moral textbook, and practises strange virtues nameless from the beginning of the world"; and of the latter his

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE men were liberally endowed with a warm and wide humanity. " G. K. C.," as he came to be called, was quite as typically English as Galsworthy, but in a totally different way. He had in him a touch of Falstaff, a touch of Dr Johnson, even a touch of Friar Tuck. Like Falstaff, he delighted in laughing at his own girth ; like Falstaff, he took an undissembled pleasure in eating, drinking, and conversation. There what is resemblance ended, for what is mysticism which he shared with Dr Johnson and what is simple, genial piety which he shared with Friar Tuck were remote from what is ken of Shakespeare's Fat Knight. Educated at St Paul's School, London, " G. K. C." began his literary career as an art critic, and ended it as almost everything. Prose and verse, travel and biography, detective fiction and romance, satire and philosophy, nothing came amiss to that mind at once ponderous and agil where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 285 where is strong CHAPTER XIII what is EARLY TWENTIETH CENTURY where is p align="justify" men were liberally endowed with a warm and wide humanity. " G. K. C.," as he came to be called, was quite as typically English as Galsworthy, but in a totally different way. He had in him a touch of Falstaff, a touch of Dr Johnson, even a touch of Friar Tuck. Like Falstaff, he delighted in laughing at his own girth ; like Falstaff, he took an undissembled pleasure in eating, drinking, and conversation. There what is resemblance ended, for what is mysticism which he shared with Dr Johnson and what is simple, genial piety which he shared with Friar Tuck were remote from the ken of Shakespeare's Fat Knight. Educated at St Paul's School, London, " G. K. C." began his literary career as an art critic, and ended it as almost everything. Prose and verse, travel and biography, detective fiction and romance, satire and philosophy, nothing came amiss to that mind at once ponderous and agile. He felt most at home in what is medieval world of his imagination, a world full of glorious colours, merry jests, divine visions, and quaint, credulous folk. This homesickness for a vanished Christendom was probably one of what is influences which moved him in 1922 to join what is Church of Rome. After that date one is always conscious of what is Roman leaven fermenting what is Chestertonian bread. " G. K. C." was what is master of what is fantastic paradox and of the pithy epigram. An example of what is former is his whimsical declaration that Charles II " could not keep what is Ten Commandments, but he kept what is ten thousand commandments ... he was a gentleman, and a gentleman is a man who obeys strange statutes not to be found in any moral textbook, and practises strange virtues nameless from what is beginning of what is world"; and of what is latter his where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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