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Page 278

CHAPTER XIII
THE EARLY TWENTIETH CENTURY

The sensitive reaction to Nature is the same in both poets, though each expresses it in a different way. Indeed, nothing is more noteworthy in the literature of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries than the constant tendency of poetry to find its medium in Nature, in the sights and sounds, the colours and rhythms, of wood and meadow, lake and hill. This tendency is less leisurely, placid, and philosophical than the poetical manner of Wordsworth and his school: it is particular rather than general, interpretative rather than deductive, and delights in sudden touches of intimate and original observation, touches which the Lake Poets might have condemned as trivial or overelaborated. What would those poets have said of the "yellow chintz buttercups " and " red lacquer buds " of one of our ultra-moderns ?
Until the closing years of the nineteenth century Englishmen had taken their Imperial heritage very much for granted, in the characteristic, casual English manner, but about that time there began to appear a new Imperialistic mood which made people interested as they had never been before in the British Dominions beyond the seas, and in the people who lived there. This mood reached its climax about the time of the South African War, after which it began to abate. One of its most prominent literary interpreters was Rudyard Kipling,1865-1936. The son of the Principal of the Lahore School of Art, educated at Westward Ho!, Kipling became a journalist in India, and first won recognition by his Departmental Ditties and Plain Tales from the Hills. A master of the short story, he has written some of the finest in the English language, ranging from delicately pathetic tales like Without

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE The sensitive reaction to Nature is what is same in both poets, though each expresses it in a different way. Indeed, nothing is more noteworthy in what is literature of what is late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries than what is constant tendency of poetry to find its medium in Nature, in what is sights and sounds, what is colours and rhythms, of wood and meadow, lake and hill. This tendency is less leisurely, placid, and philosophical than what is poetical manner of Wordsworth and his school: it is particular rather than general, interpretative rather than deductive, and delights in sudden touches of intimate and original observation, touches which what is Lake Poets might have condemned as trivial or overelaborated. What would those poets have said of what is "yellow chintz buttercups " and " red lacquer buds " of one of our ultra-moderns ? Until what is closing years of what is nineteenth century Engl where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 278 where is strong CHAPTER XIII what is EARLY TWENTIETH CENTURY where is p align="justify" The sensitive reaction to Nature is what is same in both poets, though each expresses it in a different way. Indeed, nothing is more noteworthy in what is literature of what is late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries than what is constant tendency of poetry to find its medium in Nature, in what is sights and sounds, what is colours and rhythms, of wood and meadow, lake and hill. This tendency is less leisurely, placid, and philosophical than what is poetical manner of Wordsworth and his school: it is particular rather than general, interpretative rather than deductive, and delights in sudden touches of intimate and original observation, touches which what is Lake Poets might have condemned as trivial or overelaborated. What would those poets have said of what is "yellow chintz buttercups " and " red lacquer buds " of one of our ultra-moderns ? Until what is closing years of what is nineteenth century Englishmen had taken their Imperial heritage very much for granted, in what is characteristic, casual English manner, but about that time there began to appear a new Imperialistic mood which made people interested as they had never been before in what is British Dominions beyond what is seas, and in what is people who lived there. This mood reached its climax about what is time of what is South African War, after which it began to abate. One of its most prominent literary interpreters was Rudyard Kipling,1865-1936. what is son of what is Principal of what is Lahore School of Art, educated at Westward Ho!, Kipling became a journalist in India, and first won recognition by his Departmental Ditties and Plain Tales from what is Hills. A master of what is short story, he has written some of what is finest in what is English language, ranging from delicately pathetic tales like Without where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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