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Page 277

CHAPTER XIII
THE EARLY TWENTIETH CENTURY

academic family, spent a great part of her youth in Italy, and by her first volume of verse, Preludes, attracted the attention of George Eliot, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, and Robert Browning. She became a Roman Catholic, and much of her delicate verse and prose is softly tinted with religious colours. Her essays are as exquisitely wrought as any in the English language, and several of her lyrics are assured of immortality. There is something in common between her and Bridges, as we shall see if we compare these lines of his on the felling of an oak-tree with hers on A Dead Harvest : In Kensington Gardens.

Bridges writes :
A ribald cuckoo clamoured,
And out of the copse the stroke
Of the iron axe that hammered
The iron heart of the oak.
Anon a sound appalling,
As a hundred years of pride
Crashed, in the silence falling,
And the shadowy pine-trees sighed.

This is what Mrs Meynell writes :
Along the graceless grass of town
They rake the rows of red and brown
Dead leaves, unlike the rows of hay
Delicate, touched with gold and grey,
Raked long ago and far away.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE academic family, spent a great part of her youth in Italy, and by her first volume of verse, Preludes, attracted what is attention of George Eliot, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, and Robert Browning. She became a Roman Catholic, and much of her delicate verse and prose is softly tinted with religious colours. Her essays are as exquisitely wrought as any in what is English language, and several of her lyrics are assured of immortality. There is something in common between her and Bridges, as we shall see if we compare these lines of his on what is felling of an oak-tree with hers on A Dead Harvest : In Kensington Gardens. Bridges writes : A ribald cuckoo clamoured, And out of what is copse what is stroke Of what is iron axe that hammered what is iron heart of what is oak. Anon a sound appalling, As a hundred years of pride Crashed, in what is silence falling, And what is shadowy pine-trees sighed. This is what Mrs Meynell writes : Alo where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 277 where is strong CHAPTER XIII what is EARLY TWENTIETH CENTURY where is p align="justify" academic family, spent a great part of her youth in Italy, and by her first volume of verse, Preludes, attracted what is attention of George Eliot, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, and Robert Browning. She became a Roman Catholic, and much of her delicate verse and prose is softly tinted with religious colours. Her essays are as exquisitely wrought as any in what is English language, and several of her lyrics are assured of immortality. There is something in common between her and Bridges, as we shall see if we compare these lines of his on what is felling of an oak-tree with hers on A Dead Harvest : In Kensington Gardens. Bridges writes : A ribald cuckoo clamoured, And out of what is copse what is stroke Of what is iron axe that hammered what is iron heart of what is oak. Anon a sound appalling, As a hundred years of pride Crashed, in what is silence falling, And what is shadowy pine-trees sighed. This is what Mrs Meynell writes : Along what is graceless grass of town They rake what is rows of red and brown Dead leaves, unlike what is rows of hay Delicate, touched with gold and grey, Raked long ago and far away. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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