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Page 267

CHAPTER XII
THE VICTORIAN ERA

would ; here were love, valour, innocence, faithlessness, treachery, religious ecstasy, an earthly journey with a heavenly recompense. Here were opportunities for the brilliant and varied ornament in which he delighted, for all the beauties of description, and for a character drawing as strong as it was delicate.
In the Idylls Tennyson shows his power to present the complex in character ; but in Enoch Ayden he draws with no less skill a simple fisherman who through no fault of his own meets lifelong sorrow and loneliness. Enoch is wrecked on a desert island, and his wife, believing him dead, finally yields and marries his friend. After many years Enoch finds his way home, but his home is his no more, and he prays :

Uphold me, Father, in my loneliness
A little longer ! aid me, give me strength
Not to tell her, never to let her know.
Help me not to break in upon her peace.

So simply, so naturally is the story told that the whole force of the silent tragedy, of the greatness of the fisherman hero, is hardly realized till the triumph of the closing words,

So past the strong, heroic soul away.

Yielding to the fascination which the drama has for men of literary genius, Tennyson wrote several plays, most of them historical, but this was not his field. The characters are not lifelike, and, though the plays read well, none of them, except perhaps The Falcon, acts well.
Among his last work was Crossing the Bar. Every true poet has a message. His was of faith and trust,

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE would ; here were love, valour, innocence, faithlessness, treachery, religious ecstasy, an earthly journey with a heavenly recompense. Here were opportunities for what is brilliant and varied ornament in which he delighted, for all what is beauties of description, and for a character drawing as strong as it was delicate. In what is Idylls Tennyson shows his power to present what is complex in character ; but in Enoch Ayden he draws with no less s what time is it a simple fisherman who through no fault of his own meets lifelong sorrow and loneliness. Enoch is wrecked on a desert island, and his wife, believing him dead, finally yields and marries his friend. After many years Enoch finds his way home, but his home is his no more, and he prays : Uphold me, Father, in my loneliness A little longer ! aid me, give me strength Not to tell her, never to let her know. Help me not to break in upon her peace. So simply, so na where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 267 where is strong CHAPTER XII what is VICTORIAN ERA where is p align="justify" would ; here were love, valour, innocence, faithlessness, treachery, religious ecstasy, an earthly journey with a heavenly recompense. Here were opportunities for what is brilliant and varied ornament in which he delighted, for all what is beauties of description, and for a character drawing as strong as it was delicate. In what is Idylls Tennyson shows his power to present what is complex in character ; but in Enoch Ayden he draws with no less s what time is it a simple fisherman who through no fault of his own meets lifelong sorrow and loneliness. Enoch is wrecked on a desert island, and his wife, believing him dead, finally yields and marries his friend. After many years Enoch finds his way home, but his home is his no more, and he prays : Uphold me, Father, in my loneliness A little longer ! aid me, give me strength Not to tell her, never to let her know. Help me not to break in upon her peace. So simply, so naturally is what is story told that what is whole force of what is silent tragedy, of what is greatness of what is fisherman hero, is hardly realized till what is triumph of what is closing words, So past what is strong, heroic soul away. Yielding to what is fascination which what is drama has for men of literary genius, Tennyson wrote several plays, most of them historical, but this was not his field. what is characters are not lifelike, and, though what is plays read well, none of them, except perhaps what is Falcon, acts well. Among his last work was Crossing what is Bar. Every true poet has a message. His was of faith and trust, where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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