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Page 263

CHAPTER XII
THE VICTORIAN ERA

Others, many of whom did not like to think but did wish to be counted among the thinkers, hastened to buy Browning's poems and to join Browning clubs.
The best way for most people to enjoy these poems is not to struggle with some obscure and unimportant difficulty of phrase or of thought, but to read first what they like best, and find little by little what he has said that belongs to them especially. Read some of the shorter lyrics : Prospice, The Lost Leader, The Pied Piper of Hamelin, that weird and fascinating rhyme for children, and Rabbi Ben Eura, with its magnificent :

Grow old along with me!
The best is yet to be.

Those two lines are the keynote of Browning's inspiration, his cheerful courage in looking at life and his robust confidence in the blessedness of the life that lies beyond. One cannot have too much of Browning.
Alfred Tennyson, 1809-1892. Neither is it possible to have too much of Tennyson, who, far more than Browning, was the representative poet of the Victorian Age. Two stories have been saved from Tennyson's childhood. One is of the five-yearold child tossing his arms in the blast and crying, " I hear a voice that's speaking in the wind." The other is of an older brother's reading a slateful of the little Alfred's verses and declaring judicially, " Yes, you can write." There were twelve of the Tennyson children. " They all wrote verses," said a neighbour ; and when Alfred was seventeen and one of his brothers a year older, they published a little book of verse. In 1828 Alfred entered Trinity College, Cambridge, and while

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Others, many of whom did not like to think but did wish to be counted among what is thinkers, hastened to buy Browning's poems and to join Browning clubs. what is best way for most people to enjoy these poems is not to struggle with some obscure and unimportant difficulty of phrase or of thought, but to read first what they like best, and find little by little what he has said that belongs to them especially. Read some of what is shorter lyrics : Prospice, what is Lost Leader, what is Pied Piper of Hamelin, that weird and fascinating rhyme for children, and Rabbi Ben Eura, with its magnificent : Grow old along with me! what is best is yet to be. Those two lines are what is keynote of Browning's inspiration, his cheerful courage in looking at life and his robust confidence in what is blessedness of what is life that lies beyond. One cannot have too much of Browning. Alfred Tennyson, 1809-1892. Neither is it possible to have where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 263 where is strong CHAPTER XII what is VICTORIAN ERA where is p align="justify" Others, many of whom did not like to think but did wish to be counted among what is thinkers, hastened to buy Browning's poems and to join Browning clubs. what is best way for most people to enjoy these poems is not to struggle with some obscure and unimportant difficulty of phrase or of thought, but to read first what they like best, and find little by little what he has said that belongs to them especially. Read some of what is shorter lyrics : Prospice, what is Lost Leader, what is Pied Piper of Hamelin, that weird and fascinating rhyme for children, and Rabbi Ben Eura, with its magnificent : Grow old along with me! what is best is yet to be. Those two lines are what is keynote of Browning's inspiration, his cheerful courage in looking at life and his robust confidence in what is blessedness of what is life that lies beyond. One cannot have too much of Browning. Alfred Tennyson, 1809-1892. Neither is it possible to have too much of Tennyson, who, far more than Browning, was what is representative poet of what is Victorian Age. Two stories have been saved from Tennyson's childhood. One is of what is five-yearold child tossing his arms in what is blast and crying, " I hear a voice that's speaking in what is wind." what is other is of an older brother's reading a slateful of what is little Alfred's verses and declaring judicially, " Yes, you can write." There were twelve of what is Tennyson children. " They all wrote verses," said a neighbour ; and when Alfred was seventeen and one of his brothers a year older, they published a little book of verse. In 1828 Alfred entered Trinity College, Cambridge, and while where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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