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Page 259

CHAPTER XII
THE VICTORIAN ERA

Some readers are chilled by his reserve ; but to those who sympathize, it suggests rather a feeling that is too strong-or too personal - to express itself in words. The poem that he wrote in memory of his father after a visit to Rugby Chapel fairly throbs with love and suppressed sorrow, but he writes bravely:

O strong soul, by what shore
Tarriest thou now ? For that force
Surely has not been left vain !
SoLnewhere, surely, afar,
In the sounding labour-house vast
Of being, is practised that strength,
Zealous, beneficent, firm !

As a writer of prose, Matthew Arnold's special work is criticism of books and of life. His trumpet gives no uncertain sound. As he says, " We Prose must accustom ourselves to a high standard criticism. and to a strict judgment." It is he who tells us that if we keep in mind lines and expressions of the great masters, they will serve as a touchstone to show us what poetry is real. This he says in his essay On the Study of Poetiyand it shows what clear, definite, helpful thoughts he has for those who go to him for advice or for pleasure.
In this latest age of English literature, many poets have written well ; two of them, Browning and Tennyson, are counted by all as of the first rank, while many critics would add to this select number the name of Algernon Charles Swinburne.
Robert Browning, 1812-1889. One of the most interesting of Robert Browning's writing, s is a letter which says, " I love your verses with all my heart,

travel books:
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