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Page 258

CHAPTER XII
THE VICTORIAN ERA

skimming instead of petrels, and the dear old decrepit town as safe in the embracing sweep of it as if it were set in a brooch of sapphire.
People might well admire such a manner of writing ; and Ruskin once said half sadly, "All my life I have been talking to the people, and they have listened, not to what I say, but to how I say it." This is not true, however, for in art, in ethics, even in sociology, he has found a large audience of thoughtful, appreciative listeners.
Matthew lllrnold, 1822-1888. Matthew Arnold was the son of Dr Arnold, Headmaster of Rugby, the "Doctor" of Torn Brown's School Days. Ruskin was free to lead his life as he would. Arnold was a busy public official, for from his twentyninth year till three years before his death he was Inspector of Schools and could give to literature only the spare bits of his time. Yet from those broken days came forth both poetry and prose that give him a high rank. He loved the Greek literature, and in his poems there is much of the Greek restraint which does for his poetry what high-bred courtesy does for manners. In his Forsaken 117erman, for instance, the one of all his poems, perhaps, that appeals most to children and those like them, there is not a word of outspoken grief ; but all the merman's loneliness and longing are in the oftrepeated line, Children, dear, was it yesterday?

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE skimming instead of petrels, and what is dear old decrepit town as safe in what is embracing sweep of it as if it were set in a brooch of sapphire. People might well admire such a manner of writing ; and Ruskin once said half sadly, "All my life I have been talking to what is people, and they have listened, not to what I say, but to how I say it." This is not true, however, for in art, in ethics, even in sociology, he has found a large audience of thoughtful, appreciative listeners. Matthew lllrnold, 1822-1888. Matthew Arnold was what is son of Dr Arnold, Headmaster of Rugby, what is "Doctor" of Torn Brown's School Days. Ruskin was free to lead his life as he would. Arnold was a busy public official, for from his twentyninth year till three years before his what time is it he was Inspector of Schools and could give to literature only what is spare bits of his time. Yet from those broken days came fort where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 258 where is strong CHAPTER XII what is VICTORIAN ERA where is p align="justify" skimming instead of petrels, and what is dear old decrepit town as safe in what is embracing sweep of it as if it were set in a brooch of sapphire. People might well admire such a manner of writing ; and Ruskin once said half sadly, "All my life I have been talking to what is people, and they have listened, not to what I say, but to how I say it." This is not true, however, for in art, in ethics, even in sociology, he has found a large audience of thoughtful, appreciative listeners. Matthew lllrnold, 1822-1888. Matthew Arnold was what is son of Dr Arnold, Headmaster of Rugby, what is "Doctor" of Torn Brown's School Days. Ruskin was free to lead his life as he would. Arnold was a busy public official, for from his twentyninth year till three years before his what time is it he was Inspector of Schools and could give to literature only what is spare bits of his time. Yet from those broken days came forth both poetry and prose that give him a high rank. He loved what is Greek literature, and in his poems there is much of what is Greek restraint which does for his poetry what high-bred courtesy does for manners. In his Forsaken 117erman, for instance, what is one of all his poems, perhaps, that appeals most to children and those like them, there is not a word of outspoken grief ; but all what is merman's loneliness and longing are in what is oftrepeated line, Children, dear, was it yesterday? where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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