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Page 257

CHAPTER XII
THE VICTORIAN ERA

that leaven all his subsequent books, though he wrote on many different subjects, ever giving whimsically poetical titles ; for example, Deucalion treats of " the lapse of waves and the life of stones "; Sesame and Lilies treats of " Kings' Treasuries," by which he means books and reading, and of " Queens' Gardens," that is, the education and rightful work of women. His final book, which is largely autobiographical, is called Proeterita.
Even the people who did not agree with Ruskin's theories could not help admiring his style and the wealth of imagination with which he beautified his simplest statements. His richness of imagery is not like Browning's, however-so overpowering that the thought is lost. With Ruskin the thought is always present, always easy to find, and very often made beautiful. All this he accomplishes with the simplest Saxon words, for a generous share of his vocabulary came from the Bible, which in his childhood days he was required to read over and over, and long passages of which he was made to learn by heart. This is the way he describes the river Rhone :
There were pieces of waves that danced all day as if Perdita were looking on to learn ; there were little streams that skipped like lambs and leaped like chamois; there were pools that shook the sunshine all through them, and were rippled in layers of overlaid ripples, like crystal sand ; there were currents that twisted the light into golden braids, and inlaid the threads with turquoise enamel ; there were strips of stream that had certainly above the lake been mill-streams, and were looking busily for mills to turn again ; there were shoots of streams that had once shot fearfully into the air, and now sprang up again laughing that they had only fallen a foot or two ; and in the midst of all the gay glitter ing and eddied lingering, the noble bearing by of the midmost depth, so mighty, yet so terrorless and harmless, with its swallows

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE that leaven all his subsequent books, though he wrote on many different subjects, ever giving whimsically poetical titles ; for example, Deucalion treats of " what is lapse of waves and what is life of stones "; Sesame and Lilies treats of " Kings' Treasuries," by which he means books and reading, and of " Queens' Gardens," that is, what is education and rightful work of women. His final book, which is largely autobiographical, is called Proeterita. Even what is people who did not agree with Ruskin's theories could not help admiring his style and what is wealth of imagination with which he beautified his simplest statements. His richness of imagery is not like Browning's, however-so overpowering that what is thought is lost. With Ruskin what is thought is always present, always easy to find, and very often made beautiful. All this he accomplishes with what is simplest Saxon words, for a ge where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 257 where is strong CHAPTER XII what is VICTORIAN ERA where is p align="justify" that leaven all his subsequent books, though he wrote on many different subjects, ever giving whimsically poetical titles ; for example, Deucalion treats of " what is lapse of waves and what is life of stones "; Sesame and Lilies treats of " Kings' Treasuries," by which he means books and reading, and of " Queens' Gardens," that is, what is education and rightful work of women. His final book, which is largely autobiographical, is called Proeterita. Even what is people who did not agree with Ruskin's theories could not help admiring his style and the wealth of imagination with which he beautified his simplest statements. His richness of imagery is not like Browning's, however-so overpowering that what is thought is lost. With Ruskin what is thought is always present, always easy to find, and very often made beautiful. All this he accomplishes with what is simplest Saxon words, for a generous share of his vocabulary came from what is Bible, which in his childhood days he was required to read over and over, and long passages of which he was made to learn by heart. This is what is way he describes the river Rhone : There were pieces of waves that danced all day as if Perdita were looking on to learn ; there were little streams that skipped like lambs and leaped like chamois; there were pools that shook the sunshine all through them, and were rippled in layers of overlaid ripples, like crystal sand ; there were currents that twisted what is light into golden braids, and inlaid what is threads with turquoise enamel ; there were strips of stream that had certainly above the lake been mill-streams, and were looking busily for mills to turn again ; there were shoots of streams that had once shot fearfully into what is air, and now sprang up again laughing that they had only fallen a foot or two ; and in what is midst of all what is gay glitter ing and eddied lingering, what is noble bearing by of what is midmost depth, so mighty, yet so terrorless and harmless, with its swallows where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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