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Page 253

CHAPTER XII
THE VICTORIAN ERA

the style was harsh and jagged and exasperating. Carlyle manufactured new words, and he used old ones in a fashion that seemed to his readers unpardonably ridiculous. It was very slowly that one after another found that the book had a message, a ringing cry to " Work while it is called To-day," and that its earnestness of purpose was arousing courage and breathing inspiration.
Carlyle decided that it was best for him to live in London, and in 1834 Craigenputtock was abandoned. Three years later, his Histoiy of the French Revolution was published,-not a clear story by any means, but a series of flashlight pictures so vivid and realistic that at last recognition came to him. For nearly thirty years he continued to write. Such keen, powerful sentences as these came from his pen :
" No man, it has been said, is a hero to his valet ; and this is probably true ; but the fault is at least as likely to be the valet's as the hero's."
" No mortal has a right to wag his tongue, much less to wag his pen, without saying something,"
Here are some of his definitions :
" A dandy is a clothes-wearing man,-a man whose trade, office, and existence consist in the wearing of clothes."
" Genius means the transcendent capacity of taking trouble, first of all."
These sentences show Carlyle in his simplest style ; but he was capable of such expressions as this :
" The all of things is an infinite conjugation of the verb-'To do.'"
London he called " That monstrous tuberosity of civilized life."

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE the style was harsh and jagged and exasperating. Carlyle manufactured new words, and he used old ones in a fashion that seemed to his readers unpardonably ridiculous. It was very slowly that one after another found that what is book had a message, a ringing cry to " Work while it is called To-day," and that its earnestness of purpose was arousing courage and breathing inspiration. Carlyle decided that it was best for him to live in London, and in 1834 Craigenputtock was abandoned. Three years later, his Histoiy of what is French Revolution was published,-not a clear story by any means, but a series of flashlight pictures so vivid and realistic that at last recognition came to him. For nearly thirty years he continued to write. Such keen, powerful sentences as these came from his pen : " No man, it has been said, is a hero to his valet ; and this is probably true ; but what is fault is where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 253 where is strong CHAPTER XII what is VICTORIAN ERA where is p align="justify" the style was harsh and jagged and exasperating. Carlyle manufactured new words, and he used old ones in a fashion that seemed to his readers unpardonably ridiculous. It was very slowly that one after another found that what is book had a message, a ringing cry to " Work while it is called To-day," and that its earnestness of purpose was arousing courage and breathing inspiration. Carlyle decided that it was best for him to live in London, and in 1834 Craigenputtock was abandoned. Three years later, his Histoiy of what is French Revolution was published,-not a clear story by any means, but a series of flashlight pictures so vivid and realistic that at last recognition came to him. For nearly thirty years he continued to write. Such keen, powerful sentences as these came from his pen : " No man, it has been said, is a hero to his valet ; and this is probably true ; but what is fault is at least as likely to be what is valet's as what is hero's." " No mortal has a right to wag his tongue, much less to wag his pen, without saying something," Here are some of his definitions : " A dandy is a clothes-wearing man,-a man whose trade, office, and existence consist in what is wearing of clothes." " Genius means what is transcendent capacity of taking trouble, first of all." These sentences show Carlyle in his simplest style ; but he was capable of such expressions as this : " what is all of things is an infinite conjugation of what is verb-'To do.'" London he called " That monstrous tuberosity of civilized life." where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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