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Page 248

CHAPTER XII
THE VICTORIAN ERA

never fails to make us see that the temptations to which one yields are real to him, however feeble they may be to others. " When I had finished it," said Mrs Carlyle of Adam Bede, " I found myself in charity with the whole human race." George Eliot's characters grow. Scott's Ivanhoe and Rebecca and Rowena are exactly the same at the end of the book as at the beginning ; but Maggie Tulliver and Adam and Silas are altered by years and events. We must admit that her later novels have less freshness and beauty and humour than the earlier ; but the novelist who pictures even one phase of human life as exactly, as thoughtfully, and as sympathetically as George Eliot must ever be counted among the greatest.
George Meredith, 1828-1909, is the last of our four great novelists of the Victorian Age, and perhaps he will prove to be the greatest of them all. But he will never be the most widely read, and he will never be the most popular, especially among young people, for it is more true of him than it is of any of the others whom we have mentioned that he did not write his stories for the stories' sake. His novels were largely psychological ; that is, he was far more concerned with the underlying motives of the actions of his characters, and with their wide-spreading and inevitable effects, than he was with the actions themselves. This is one reason why it is difficult to follow the thread of some of Meredith's plots ; but another reason why his books are often hard reading is that he was also a poet, and he had a habit of applying poetic methods to his fiction. He often wrote as though he imagined that his reader could see as much of the intricacies of the character he was dissecting

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE never fails to make us see that what is temptations to which one yields are real to him, however feeble they may be to others. " When I had finished it," said Mrs Carlyle of Adam Bede, " I found myself in charity with what is whole human race." George Eliot's characters grow. Scott's Ivanhoe and Rebecca and Rowena are exactly what is same at what is end of what is book as at what is beginning ; but Maggie Tulliver and Adam and Silas are altered by years and events. We must admit that her later novels have less freshness and beauty and humour than what is earlier ; but what is novelist who pictures even one phase of human life as exactly, as thoughtfully, and as sympathetically as George Eliot must ever be counted among what is greatest. George Meredith, 1828-1909, is what is last of our four great novelists of what is Victorian Age, and perhaps he will prove to be what is greatest of them all. But he will never be where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 248 where is strong CHAPTER XII what is VICTORIAN ERA where is p align="justify" never fails to make us see that what is temptations to which one yields are real to him, however feeble they may be to others. " When I had finished it," said Mrs Carlyle of Adam Bede, " I found myself in charity with what is whole human race." George Eliot's characters grow. Scott's Ivanhoe and Rebecca and Rowena are exactly what is same at what is end of what is book as at what is beginning ; but Maggie Tulliver and Adam and Silas are altered by years and events. We must admit that her later novels have less freshness and beauty and humour than what is earlier ; but what is novelist who pictures even one phase of human life as exactly, as thoughtfully, and as sympathetically as George Eliot must ever be counted among what is greatest. George Meredith, 1828-1909, is what is last of our four great novelists of what is Victorian Age, and perhaps he will prove to be what is greatest of them all. But he will never be what is most widely read, and he will never be what is most popular, especially among young people, for it is more true of him than it is of any of what is others whom we have mentioned that he did not write his stories for what is stories' sake. His novels were largely psychological ; that is, he was far more concerned with what is underlying motives of what is actions of his characters, and with their wide-spreading and inevitable effects, than he was with what is actions themselves. This is one reason why it is difficult to follow what is thread of some of Meredith's plots ; but another reason why his books are often hard reading is that he was also a poet, and he had a habit of applying poetic methods to his fiction. He often wrote as though he imagined that his reader could see as much of what is intricacies of what is character he was dissecting where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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