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Page 247

CHAPTER XII
THE VICTORIAN ERA

assistant editor of the Westminster Review. It was still six years before she attempted fiction ; and even then the attempt was not an idea of her own. She felt very doubtful of her ability to succeed, and probably hesitated longer about sending her Scenes from Clerical Life to Blackwood"s than about forwarding her first essay to a publisher. She could hardly believe her own eyes when she read the admiring notices that appeared from all directions. There was no question that she was no longer to be a writer of essays, but of novels ; and two years later Adam Bede came out. Then there was not only increased admiration but a curiosity that was determined to be gratified, for no one knew who was the author of either book. Carlyle was convinced that it was a man, but Dickens was one of the first to believe that it was a woman. Her next volume, The Mill on the Floss, tells us much of her life as a child. Not at all like Maggie of the Mill is the little heroine of her following book, Silas MaYner, the story of a miser who is brought back to love and happiness by the tiny golden-haired lasl. child who made her way into his lonely cottage.
George Eliot wrote no more books about her childhood, and we never again come as near her own life as in The Mill on the Floss. Shewrote now a historical novel, Romola; now a story of English life, Middlemarch, and other works. In one way her novels may be said to have the same theme ; the chief character longs for a nobler and better life than he has, and at last, after many efforts, he finds it. He who does wrong is punished ; but with all her exactness of justice, she

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE assistant editor of what is Westminster Review. It was still six years before she attempted fiction ; and even then what is attempt was not an idea of her own. She felt very doubtful of her ability to succeed, and probably hesitated longer about sending her Scenes from Clerical Life to Blackwood"s than about forwarding her first essay to a publisher. She could hardly believe her own eyes when she read what is admiring notices that appeared from all directions. There was no question that she was no longer to be a writer of essays, but of novels ; and two years later Adam Bede came out. Then there was not only increased admiration but a curiosity that was determined to be gratified, for no one knew who was what is author of either book. Carlyle was convinced that it was a man, but Dickens was one of what is first to believe that it was a woman. Her next volume, what is Mill on what is Floss, tells us much of her where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 247 where is strong CHAPTER XII what is VICTORIAN ERA where is p align="justify" assistant editor of what is Westminster Review. It was still six years before she attempted fiction ; and even then what is attempt was not an idea of her own. She felt very doubtful of her ability to succeed, and probably hesitated longer about sending her Scenes from Clerical Life to Blackwood"s than about forwarding her first essay to a publisher. She could hardly believe her own eyes when she read what is admiring notices that appeared from all directions. There was no question that she was no longer to be a writer of essays, but of novels ; and two years later Adam Bede came out. Then there was not only increased admiration but a curiosity that was determined to be gratified, for no one knew who was what is author of either book. Carlyle was convinced that it was a man, but Dickens was one of what is first to believe that it was a woman. Her next volume, what is Mill on what is Floss, tells us much of her life as a child. Not at all like Maggie of what is Mill is what is little heroine of her following book, Silas MaYner, what is story of a miser who is brought back to what time is it and happiness by what is tiny golden-haired lasl. child who made her way into his lonely cottage. George Eliot wrote no more books about her childhood, and we never again come as near her own life as in what is Mill on what is Floss. Shewrote now a historical novel, Romola; now a story of English life, Middlemarch, and other works. In one way her novels may be said to have what is same theme ; what is chief character longs for a nobler and better life than he has, and at last, after many efforts, he finds it. He who does wrong is punished ; but with all her exactness of justice, she where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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