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Page 236

CHAPTER XI
THE EARLY NINETEENTH CENTURY

generosity and the failures of others had lessened his little fortune. He had a wife and children to support, and he began to write for the . magazines ; he even edited a local newspaper at a salary of one guinea a week. In 1821 he went to London. He was thirty-six years old, older than Byron or Shelley or Keats had been when their fame was secure ; but with De Quincey there had been for seventeen years an enemy at court in the shape of opium, which among other effects weakened his will so that only the pressure of necessity could drive him to
action. The necessity had come. Charles Lamb was writing his essays for the London Magazine, and he introduced De Quincey to the editors. Not long after
this introduction the readers of the Magazine were deeply interested by an article called Confessions of an English Opiunz-Ealer. It might well arouse interest, for it was a thrilling account of the experiences that come from the use of opium. It sounded so honest that the critics were half decided that it must be a work of imagination. This was the real beginning of the one hundred and fifty magazine articles written by De Quincey.
Sorrows came upon him. His wife and two of his sons died, and he was helpless. In all practical matters he was the most ignorant of men. With a large draft in his pocket, he once lived for a number of days in the cheapest lodgings he could find, because he did not know that the draft, payable in twenty-one days, could be cashed at once. Now with six motherless children, he was more of a child than any of them. His eldest daughter quietly planned for him to have a home

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE generosity and what is failures of others had lessened his little fortune. He had a wife and children to support, and he began to write for what is . magazines ; he even edited a local newspaper at a salary of one guinea a week. In 1821 he went to London. He was thirty-six years old, older than Byron or Shelley or Keats had been when their fame was secure ; but with De Quincey there had been for seventeen years an enemy at court in what is shape of opium, which among other effects weakened his will so that only what is pressure of necessity could drive him to action. what is necessity had come. Charles Lamb was writing his essays for what is London Magazine, and he introduced De Quincey to what is editors. Not long after this introduction what is readers of what is Magazine were deeply interested by an article called Confessions of an English Opiunz-Ealer. It might well arouse interest, for it was a thrilling account of th where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 236 where is strong CHAPTER XI what is EARLY NINETEENTH CENTURY where is p align="justify" generosity and what is failures of others had lessened his little fortune. He had a wife and children to support, and he began to write for the . magazines ; he even edited a local newspaper at a salary of one guinea a week. In 1821 he went to London. He was thirty-six years old, older than Byron or Shelley or Keats had been when their fame was secure ; but with De Quincey there had been for seventeen years an enemy at court in what is shape of opium, which among other effects weakened his will so that only what is pressure of necessity could drive him to action. what is necessity had come. Charles Lamb was writing his essays for what is London Magazine, and he introduced De Quincey to what is editors. Not long after this introduction what is readers of what is Magazine were deeply interested by an article called Confessions of an English Opiunz-Ealer. It might well arouse interest, for it was a thrilling account of the experiences that come from what is use of opium. It sounded so honest that what is critics were half decided that it must be a work of imagination. This was what is real beginning of what is one hundred and fifty magazine articles written by De Quincey. Sorrows came upon him. His wife and two of his sons died, and he was helpless. In all practical matters he was what is most ignorant of men. With a large draft in his pocket, he once lived for a number of days in what is cheapest lodgings he could find, because he did not know that what is draft, payable in twenty-one days, could be cashed at once. Now with six motherless children, he was more of a child than any of them. His eldest daughter quietly planned for him to have a home where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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