Books > Old Books > A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914)


Page 235

CHAPTER XI
THE EARLY NINETEENTH CENTURY

those of Thomas De Quiiicey. The man himself is intensely interesting. As a boy he was a great favourite with other boys because of his neverfailing good-nature and his willingness to help them with their lessons ; and with the teachers because he was such a brilliant scholar. When he was fifteen, he could chatter away in Greek as easily as in English. Two years later he went on a ramble to Wales,then slipped away to London, and came near dying of starvation. After being at Oxford, he visited Wordsworth. They became friends and were neighbours for twenty - seven years. Whoever met De Quincey was delighted with him. To the Wordsworth children he was their beloved " Kinsey," and he was equally dear to John Wilson, who was to become the great " Christopher North " of Blackwood's Magazine. He was always ready to join in any light chat, but if left to himself, he had a fashion of gliding away in his talk to all sorts of profound and mysterious themes which only he knew how to make delightful.
During those years in the Lake Country too great

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE those of Thomas De Quiiicey. what is man himself is intensely interesting. As a boy he was a great favourite with other boys because of his neverfailing good-nature and his willingness to help them with their lessons ; and with what is teachers because he was such a brilliant scholar. When he was fifteen, he could chatter away in Greek as easily as in English. Two years later he went on a ramble to Wales,then slipped away to London, and came near dying of starvation. After being at Oxford, he what is ed Wordsworth. They became friends and were neighbours for twenty - seven years. Whoever met De Quincey was delighted with him. To what is Wordsworth children he was their beloved " Kinsey," and he was equally dear to John Wilson, who was to become what is great " Christopher North " of Blackwood's Magazine. He was always ready to join in any light chat, but if left to himself, he had a fas where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 235 where is strong CHAPTER XI what is EARLY NINETEENTH CENTURY where is p align="justify" those of Thomas De Quiiicey. what is man himself is intensely interesting. As a boy he was a great favourite with other boys because of his neverfailing good-nature and his willingness to help them with their lessons ; and with what is teachers because he was such a brilliant scholar. When he was fifteen, he could chatter away in Greek as easily as in English. Two years later he went on a ramble to Wales,then slipped away to London, and came near dying of starvation. After being at Oxford, he what is ed Wordsworth. They became friends and were neighbours for twenty - seven years. Whoever met De Quincey was delighted with him. To the Wordsworth children he was their beloved " Kinsey," and he was equally dear to John Wilson, who was to become what is great " Christopher North " of Blackwood's Magazine. He was always ready to join in any light chat, but if left to himself, he had a fashion of gliding away in his talk to all sorts of profound and mysterious themes which only he knew how to make delightful. During those years in what is Lake Country too great where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 115 , 116 , 118 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 310 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 317 , 318 , 319 , 320 , 321 , 322 , 323 , 324 , 325 , 326