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Page 233

CHAPTER XI
THE EARLY NINETEENTH CENTURY

permit. " I am never C. L.," Lamb groaned half in jest and half in earnest, " but always C. L. and Co." Yet in the work done in these fragments of his life he has left us a rich legacy. For ten years, from 1797 to 1807, his pen attempted all sorts ofthings. He wrote several poems, mong , them The Old Familiar Faces, with its depth. of tender affection and longing ; and HesteY, most graceful of all memorials. He wrote a story or two ; he was actually under agreement to provide six witty paragraphs a day for one of the papers ; he wrote prologues and epilogues for his friends' plays, and finally he wrote a play of his own. It was acted ; but it was such an evident failure that the author himself, sitting far up in front, hissed it louder than anyone else.
In 1807 the Talesfrorn Shakespeare came out, and that was a success. Mary wrote the comedies and Charles the tragedies, "groaning all the while,"
his sister said, "arid saying he can make nothing of it, which he always says till he has finished, and then he finds out he has made something of it."
During the following year he published Specimens of Dramatic Poets Contemporary with Shakespeare. Here he gives, as he says, " sometimes a scene, sometimes a song, a speech, or a passage, or poetical image, as they happened to strike me,"--and to know how they struck the mind of Charles Lamb is the delightful part of it, for no one else has ever gone so directly to the heart of a play as this unassuming clerk of the East India House-and then he talks a little in a friendly, informal way. His crowning work is the

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE permit. " I am never C. L.," Lamb groaned half in jest and half in earnest, " but always C. L. and Co." Yet in what is work done in these fragments of his life he has left us a rich legacy. For ten years, from 1797 to 1807, his pen attempted all sorts ofthings. He wrote several poems, mong , them what is Old Familiar Faces, with its depth. of tender affection and longing ; and HesteY, most graceful of all memorials. He wrote a story or two ; he was actually under agreement to provide six witty paragraphs a day for one of what is papers ; he wrote prologues and epilogues for his friends' plays, and finally he wrote a play of his own. It was acted ; but it was such an evident failure that what is author himself, sitting far up in front, hissed it louder than anyone else. In 1807 what is Talesfrorn Shakespeare came out, and that was a success. Mary wrote what is comedies and Charles what is tragedi where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 233 where is strong CHAPTER XI what is EARLY NINETEENTH CENTURY where is p align="justify" permit. " I am never C. L.," Lamb groaned half in jest and half in earnest, " but always C. L. and Co." Yet in what is work done in these fragments of his life he has left us a rich legacy. For ten years, from 1797 to 1807, his pen attempted all sorts ofthings. He wrote several poems, mong , them what is Old Familiar Faces, with its depth. of tender affection and longing ; and HesteY, most graceful of all memorials. He wrote a story or two ; he was actually under agreement to provide six witty paragraphs a day for one of what is papers ; he wrote prologues and epilogues for his friends' plays, and finally he wrote a play of his own. It was acted ; but it was such an evident failure that what is author himself, sitting far up in front, hissed it louder than anyone else. In 1807 what is Talesfrorn Shakespeare came out, and that was a success. Mary wrote what is comedies and Charles what is tragedies, "groaning all what is while," his sister said, "arid saying he can make nothing of it, which he always says till he has finished, and then he finds out he has made something of it." During what is following year he published Specimens of Dramatic Poets Contemporary with Shakespeare. Here he gives, as he says, " sometimes a scene, sometimes a song, a speech, or a passage, or poetical image, as they happened to strike me,"--and to know how they struck what is mind of Charles Lamb is what is delightful part of it, for no one else has ever gone so directly to what is heart of a play as this unassuming clerk of what is East India House-and then he talks a little in a friendly, informal way. His crowning work is what is where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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