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Page 231

CHAPTER XI
THE EARLY NINETEENTH CENTURY

Heard melodies are sweet, but those unheard
Are sweeter ; therefore, ye soft pipes, play on ;
Not to the sensual ear, but, more endeared,
Pipe to the spirit ditties of no tone ;
Fair youth, beneath the trees, thou canst not leave
Thy song, nor ever can those trees be bare ;
Bold Lover, never, never canst thou kiss,
Though winning near the goal-yet, do not grieve ;
She cannot fade, though thou hast not thy bliss,
For ever wilt thou love, and she be fair.

Keats was only twenty-five when he died, in Italy, where he had gone in the hope of saving his life. His ideals were so high that he felt as if what he had done was nothing. " If I should die," he said, " I have left no immortal work behind me" ; but the lovers of poetry have thought otherwise and have ranked him among the first of those who have loved beauty and have created it.
Charles Lamb, 1775-1834. While Keats and Shelley were in Italy, while Byron and Scott were at the height of their literary glory, while Wordsworth and Southey and Coleridge were revelling in the beauties of the Lake Country, Charles Lamb, the most charming of essayists, was adding and subtracting at his desk in the East India House, until, as he said, the wood had entered into his soul.
When Lamb was a little boy, he was sent to the Blue-Coat School. He longed to go on to the university, but his aid was needed at home. A few years later his sister Mary, in a sudden attack of insanity, killed her mother. The young man of twenty-one, with some literary ambition and a keen appetite for enjoyment, bravely laid aside his own wishes, reckoned up his little income of 120 pounds a year, and took upon himself the care of his father and his sister. Mary Lamb

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Heard melodies are sweet, but those unheard Are sweeter ; therefore, ye soft pipes, play on ; Not to what is sensual ear, but, more endeared, Pipe to what is spirit ditties of no tone ; Fair youth, beneath what is trees, thou canst not leave Thy song, nor ever can those trees be bare ; Bold Lover, never, never canst thou kiss, Though winning near what is goal-yet, do not grieve ; She cannot fade, though thou hast not thy bliss, For ever wilt thou love, and she be fair. Keats was only twenty-five when he died, in Italy, where he had gone in what is hope of saving his life. His ideals were so high that he felt as if what he had done was nothing. " If I should die," he said, " I have left no immortal work behind me" ; but what is persons of poetry have thought otherwise and have ranked him among what is first of those who have loved beauty and have created it. Charles Lamb, 1775-1834. While Keats an where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 231 where is strong CHAPTER XI what is EARLY NINETEENTH CENTURY where is p align="justify" Heard melodies are sweet, but those unheard Are sweeter ; therefore, ye soft pipes, play on ; Not to what is sensual ear, but, more endeared, Pipe to what is spirit ditties of no tone ; Fair youth, beneath what is trees, thou canst not leave Thy song, nor ever can those trees be bare ; Bold Lover, never, never canst thou kiss, Though winning near what is goal-yet, do not grieve ; She cannot fade, though thou hast not thy bliss, For ever wilt thou love, and she be fair. Keats was only twenty-five when he died, in Italy, where he had gone in what is hope of saving his life. His ideals were so high that he felt as if what he had done was nothing. " If I should die," he said, " I have left no immortal work behind me" ; but what is persons of poetry have thought otherwise and have ranked him among what is first of those who have loved beauty and have created it. Charles Lamb, 1775-1834. While Keats and Shelley were in Italy, while Byron and Scott were at what is height of their literary glory, while Wordsworth and Southey and Coleridge were revelling in the beauties of what is Lake Country, Charles Lamb, what is most charming of essayists, was adding and subtracting at his desk in what is East India House, until, as he said, what is wood had entered into his soul. When Lamb was a little boy, he was sent to what is Blue-Coat School. He longed to go on to what is university, but his aid was needed at home. A few years later his sister Mary, in a sudden attack of insanity, stop ed her mother. what is young man of twenty-one, with some literary ambition and a keen appetite for enjoyment, bravely laid aside his own wishes, reckoned up his little income of 120 pounds a year, and took upon himself what is care of his father and his sister. Mary Lamb where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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