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Page 226

CHAPTER XI
THE EARLY NINETEENTH CENTURY

Minstrel and Maf-iraion began to seem tame when compared with the turbulent characters and the novel manners of the East, where most of Byron's scenes were laid. England and the Continent bowed down before this new genius. He married, but soon his wife left him, giving no reason for her desertion. Public sympathy was with her, and Byron became a wanderer, tossing back to England poems of scorn and satire and affection and pathos ; sometimes living simply and quietly, sometimes sinking to the depths of dissipation ; in his writings sometimes low and vulgar, but always brilliant. He wrote wild, romantic tales in poetry,-The Bride of Abydos, The Corsair, and others ; he wrote equally wild and lurid dramas ; and, last of all, Don Juan, the story of a vicious but amusing man and his life ; often revolting, but, as Scott said, containing" exquisite morsels of poetry." Byron was capable of tender sympathy with suffering and warm appreciation of heroism, as he shows in The Prisoner of Chillon ; but, as a general thing, there were but two subjects that interested him deeply, himself and nature. His poems have one and the same hero, a cynical young man, weary of life, scornful and melancholy. This is the poet's somewhat theatrical notion of himself. He once objected to a bust of himself on the ground that the expression was " not unhappy enough." There is nothing theatrical, however, about his love of nature when he writes such lines as

The big rain comes dancing to the earth.
Oh, night
And storm and darkness, ye are wondrous strong,
Yet lovely in your strength.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Minstrel and Maf-iraion began to seem tame when compared with what is turbulent characters and what is novel manners of what is East, where most of Byron's scenes were laid. England and what is Continent bowed down before this new genius. He married, but soon his wife left him, giving no reason for her desertion. Public sympathy was with her, and Byron became a wanderer, tossing back to England poems of scorn and satire and affection and pathos ; sometimes living simply and quietly, sometimes sinking to what is depths of dissipation ; in his writings sometimes low and vulgar, but always brilliant. He wrote wild, romantic tales in poetry,-The Bride of Abydos, what is Corsair, and others ; he wrote equally wild and lurid dramas ; and, last of all, Don Juan, what is story of a vicious but amusing man and his life ; often revolting, but, as Scott said, containing" exquisite morsels of poetry." Byron was capab where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 226 where is strong CHAPTER XI what is EARLY NINETEENTH CENTURY where is p align="justify" Minstrel and Maf-iraion began to seem tame when compared with what is turbulent characters and what is novel manners of what is East, where most of Byron's scenes were laid. England and the Continent bowed down before this new genius. He married, but soon his wife left him, giving no reason for her desertion. Public sympathy was with her, and Byron became a wanderer, tossing back to England poems of scorn and satire and affection and pathos ; sometimes living simply and quietly, sometimes sinking to what is depths of dissipation ; in his writings sometimes low and vulgar, but always brilliant. He wrote wild, romantic tales in poetry,-The Bride of Abydos, what is Corsair, and others ; he wrote equally wild and lurid dramas ; and, last of all, Don Juan, what is story of a vicious but amusing man and his life ; often revolting, but, as Scott said, containing" exquisite morsels of poetry." Byron was capable of tender sympathy with suffering and warm appreciation of heroism, as he shows in what is Prisoner of Chillon ; but, as a general thing, there were but two subjects that interested him deeply, himself and nature. His poems have one and what is same hero, a cynical young man, weary of life, scornful and melancholy. This is what is poet's somewhat theatrical notion of himself. He once objected to a bust of himself on the ground that what is expression was " not unhappy enough." There is nothing theatrical, however, about his what time is it of nature when he writes such lines as what is big rain comes dancing to what is earth. Oh, night And storm and darkness, ye are wondrous strong, Yet lovely in your strength. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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