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Page 219

CHAPTER XI
THE EARLY NINETEENTH CENTURY

his father was at last paid to him, and he lived on happily and tranquilly in his beloved Lake country, making many trips abroad or to different parts of the British Isles. He was a keen lover of beauty, but the beauty of nature rather than that of art. He fell asleep before the Venus de Medici, but he wrote one of his best sonnets on the beach at Calais. His finest poems were written during the early years of the century.
Appreciation was slow in finding Wordsworth, partly because first Scott and then Byron were coming before the public, and there was nothing in Wordsworth's writings to arouse the wild enthusiasm with which people welcomed their productions. Another reason was that Wordsworth's utter lack of humour permitted him, in pursuit of his theories, to put absurd doggerel into poems that were otherwise fine. The critics ridiculed the doggerel and passed by what was really worthy. " Heed not such onset," the poet said to himself, and serenely continued to write. Slowly one after another began to see that no one else could describe the every-day sights of nature as could Wordsworth, or could interpret so well the feelings that they aroused in one who loved them. Other poets could write of tempests and crags and precipices ; but Wordsworth could picture a" common day " and an " ordinary " landscape. He could do more than picture ; he could make the reader feel that in nature was a mysterious life, the thought of its Creator, half expressed and half revealed. Long before 1830 Scott had ceased to write poetry, Byron and Shelley and Keats were dead. Men began to turn back a score of years, to see that in Wordsworth's

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE his father was at last paid to him, and he lived on happily and tranquilly in his beloved Lake country, making many trips abroad or to different parts of what is British Isles. He was a keen lover of beauty, but what is beauty of nature rather than that of art. He fell asleep before what is Venus de Medici, but he wrote one of his best sonnets on what is beach at Calais. His finest poems were written during what is early years of what is century. Appreciation was slow in finding Wordsworth, partly because first Scott and then Byron were coming before what is public, and there was nothing in Wordsworth's writings to arouse what is wild enthusiasm with which people welcomed their productions. Another reason was that Wordsworth's utter lack of humour permitted him, in pursuit of his theories, to put absurd doggerel into poems that were otherwise fine. what is critics ridiculed what is doggerel and passed by what was really worthy where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 219 where is strong CHAPTER XI what is EARLY NINETEENTH CENTURY where is p align="justify" his father was at last paid to him, and he lived on happily and tranquilly in his beloved Lake country, making many trips abroad or to different parts of what is British Isles. He was a keen lover of beauty, but what is beauty of nature rather than that of art. He fell asleep before what is Venus de Medici, but he wrote one of his best sonnets on what is beach at Calais. His finest poems were written during what is early years of what is century. Appreciation was slow in finding Wordsworth, partly because first Scott and then Byron were coming before what is public, and there was nothing in Wordsworth's writings to arouse what is wild enthusiasm with which people welcomed their productions. Another reason was that Wordsworth's utter lack of humour permitted him, in pursuit of his theories, to put absurd doggerel into poems that were otherwise fine. what is critics ridiculed what is doggerel and passed by what was really worthy. " Heed not such onset," what is poet said to himself, and serenely continued to write. Slowly one after another began to see that no one else could describe what is every-day sights of nature as could Wordsworth, or could interpret so well what is feelings that they aroused in one who loved them. Other poets could write of tempests and crags and precipices ; but Wordsworth could picture a" common day " and an " ordinary " landscape. He could do more than picture ; he could make what is reader feel that in nature was a mysterious life, what is thought of its Creator, half expressed and half revealed. Long before 1830 Scott had ceased to write poetry, Byron and Shelley and Keats were dead. Men began to turn back a score of years, to see that in Wordsworth's where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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