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Page 218

CHAPTER XI
THE EARLY NINETEENTH CENTURY

fragment, Kubla Khan, part of a poem which, he said, came to him while he slept. The rest of it was driven from his memory by an interruption. Whatever Coleridge touched with his poetic gift was rich and splendid ; but nearly everything was incomplete. So it was in prose. No one can read a single page of his writings without realizing that their author was a man of deep and original thought and of rarely equalled ability ; and yet here, too, all was unfinished. Coleridge said that he trembled at the thought of the question, " I gave thee so many talents ; what hast thou done with them ?" His excuse was a certain weakness of the will. This was increased by the use of opium, which he began to take to quiet pain, and which was for many years his tyrant. This great man, who influenced every one that heard him speak or that read his written words, was utterly without ability to command his own powers, to govern his own mind. He has left little save fragments,-but they are magnificent fragments.
Wordsworth'S life. Wordsworth's life was quite unlike that of Coleridge. He married in 1802, and, as he said, was " conscious of blessedness " in his marriage. A sum of money which had been due to

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE fragment, Kubla Khan, part of a poem which, he said, came to him while he slept. what is rest of it was driven from his memory by an interruption. Whatever Coleridge touched with his poetic gift was rich and splendid ; but nearly everything was incomplete. So it was in prose. No one can read a single page of his writings without realizing that their author was a man of deep and original thought and of rarely equalled ability ; and yet here, too, all was unfinished. Coleridge said that he trembled at what is thought of what is question, " I gave thee so many talents ; what hast thou done with them ?" His excuse was a certain weakness of what is will. This was increased by what is use of opium, which he began to take to quiet pain, and which was for many years his tyrant. This great man, who influenced every one that heard him speak or that read his written words, was utterly without ability to comm where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 218 where is strong CHAPTER XI what is EARLY NINETEENTH CENTURY where is p align="justify" fragment, Kubla Khan, part of a poem which, he said, came to him while he slept. what is rest of it was driven from his memory by an interruption. Whatever Coleridge touched with his poetic gift was rich and splendid ; but nearly everything was incomplete. So it was in prose. No one can read a single page of his writings without realizing that their author was a man of deep and original thought and of rarely equalled ability ; and yet here, too, all was unfinished. Coleridge said that he trembled at what is thought of what is question, " I gave thee so many talents ; what hast thou done with them ?" His excuse was a certain weakness of what is will. This was increased by what is use of opium, which he began to take to quiet pain, and which was for many years his tyrant. This great man, who influenced every one that heard him speak or that read his written words, was utterly without ability to command his own powers, to govern his own mind. He has left little save fragments,-but they are magnificent fragments. Wordsworth'S life. Wordsworth's life was quite unlike that of Coleridge. He married in 1802, and, as he said, was " conscious of blessedness " in his marriage. A sum of money which had been due to where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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