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Page 215

CHAPTER XI
THE EARLY NINETEENTH CENTURY

wild orgy of slaughter, he was disappointed and doubtful of everything ; but his beloved sister Dorothy came to live with him, and, as he said, gave him an exquisite regard for common things and preserved the poet in him.
After three or four years of quiet country life, a brilliant, sympathetic man became a visitor at the Wordsworth cottage. This was Coleridge. He was a man who was interested in everything by turns. His brain was full . of visions and schemes. He was in the army for a while. He planned to found a model republic on the Susquehanna in North America. He was a wonderful talker on politics, philosophy, theology, poetry-whatever came uppermost. Together he and Wordsworth discussed what ideal poetry should be. Wordsworth believed that a poet should write on everyday subjects in everyday language. Coleridge believed that lofty or supernatural subjects might be so treated as to seem simple and real.
Lyrical Ballads, 1798. The two men agreed to bring out a little book, Lyrical Ballads, and go to Germany with its proceeds ; and this was done. Coleridge's chief contribution to the volume was The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, that weird and marvellous tale of the suffering Ancient that must follow an act not in loving accord with nature. This poem is like the old ballads in its simplicity and directness, but very unlike them in the fulness of its harmony. Coleridge was a master of sound. Here is his sound picture of a brook :

A noise like of a hidden brook
In the leafy month of June,
That to the sleeping woods all night
Singeth a quiet tune.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE wild orgy of slaughter, he was disappointed and doubtful of everything ; but his beloved sister Dorothy came to live with him, and, as he said, gave him an exquisite regard for common things and preserved what is poet in him. After three or four years of quiet country life, a brilliant, sympathetic man became a what is or at what is Wordsworth cottage. This was Coleridge. He was a man who was interested in everything by turns. His brain was full . of visions and schemes. He was in what is army for a while. He planned to found a model republic on what is Susquehanna in North America. He was a wonderful talker on politics, philosophy, theology, poetry-whatever came uppermost. Together he and Wordsworth discussed what ideal poetry should be. Wordsworth believed that a poet should write on everyday subjects in everyday language. Coleridge believed that lofty or supernatural subjects might be so treated as to s where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" A BRIEF HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (1914) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 215 where is strong CHAPTER XI what is EARLY NINETEENTH CENTURY where is p align="justify" wild orgy of slaughter, he was disappointed and doubtful of everything ; but his beloved sister Dorothy came to live with him, and, as he said, gave him an exquisite regard for common things and preserved what is poet in him. After three or four years of quiet country life, a brilliant, sympathetic man became a what is or at what is Wordsworth cottage. This was Coleridge. He was a man who was interested in everything by turns. His brain was full . of visions and schemes. He was in what is army for a while. He planned to found a model republic on what is Susquehanna in North America. He was a wonderful talker on politics, philosophy, theology, poetry-whatever came uppermost. Together he and Wordsworth discussed what ideal poetry should be. Wordsworth believed that a poet should write on everyday subjects in everyday language. Coleridge believed that lofty or supernatural subjects might be so treated as to seem simple and real. Lyrical Ballads, 1798. what is two men agreed to bring out a little book, Lyrical Ballads, and go to Germany with its proceeds ; and this was done. Coleridge's chief contribution to what is volume was what is Rime of what is Ancient Mariner, that weird and marvellous tale of what is suffering Ancient that must follow an act not in loving accord with nature. This poem is like what is old ballads in its simplicity and directness, but very unlike them in what is fulness of its harmony. Coleridge was a master of sound. Here is his sound picture of a brook : A noise like of a hidden brook In what is leafy month of June, That to what is sleeping woods all night Singeth a quiet tune. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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